Why do genetically altered pigs shock animal lovers?

Shocking footage has emerged of mutant Hulk-like pigs which are being bred by Cambodian farmers.

The company, called Duroc Cambodia, appear to have genetically modified the animals who were kept in cages and the results have appalled critics, the Daily Mail reports.

Videos of the pigs show that they are unable to walk properly because of their freakishly large muscles.

[…] Concerned animal lovers have been left disgusted by the footage on the page and voiced their anger at the farmer.

Animal lovers in the West are very quick to condemn farmers in Cambodia for using genetic modification to try to increase the amount of meat and therefore money they can get from their pigs. While I do not in any way approve of what the farmers are doing those protesting the horror of genetic modification have forgotten one very salient fact about the West.

Janice Short wrote on the page: “This is grotesque. Obviously bred like this. Are there no laws to stop this sort of thing?”

[…] Animal right group PETA have also condemned the practice, and said: “Hulk-like pigs are the stuff of nightmares, not meals, and those who are genetically engineered are also likely to be born with painful health issues.”

-NZ Herald

I am so glad that they mentioned painful health issues as multiple “created” breeds of dogs in the West have been genetically altered to please so-called animal lovers who pay thousands of dollars for animals that have been mutated out of all recognition. They have been genetically altered not so poor farmers can make a living but so that wealthy people can carry the small ones around as fashion accessories.

The health issues that these animals have are disgusting and cruel. A person I know paid a lot of money for a specific breed of dog and months later one of its eyes literally popped out. It turned out this was a common ” issue” with the genetically altered breed. Others have breathing problems, hip problems and some cannot give birth naturally.

It seems incredible that at one time the Bull Terrier was a handsome, athletic dog. Somewhere along its journey to a mutated skull and thick abdomen the bull terrier also picked up a number of other maladies like supernumerary teeth and compulsive tail-chasing.

The Basset Hound has gotten lower, has suffered changes to its rear leg structure, has excessive skin, vertebra problems, droopy eyes prone to entropion and ectropion and excessively large ears.

A shorter face means a host of problems. The modern Boxer not only has a shorter face but the muzzle is slightly upturned. The boxer – like all bracecyphalic dogs – has difficulty controlling its temperature in hot weather, the inability to shed heat places limits on physical performance. It also has one of the highest cancer rates.

The English bulldog has come to symbolize all that is wrong with the dog fancy and not without good reason; they suffer from almost every possible disease. A 2004 survey by the Kennel Club found that they die at the median age of 6.25 years (n=180). There really is no such thing as a healthy bulldog. The bulldog’s monstrous proportions make them virtually incapable of mating or birthing without medical intervention.

The Dachshund used to have functional legs and necks that made sense for their size. Backs and necks have gotten longer, chest jutted forward and legs have shrunk to such proportions that there is barely any clearance between the chest and floor. The dachschund has the highest risk of any breed for intervertebral disc disease which can result in paralysis; they are also prone to achondroplastic related pathologies, PRA and problems with their legs.

The German Shepherd Dog is also a breed that is routinely mentioned when people talk about ruined breeds; maybe because they used to be awesome. In Dogs of All Nations, the GSD is described as a medium-sized dog (25 kg /55 lb), this is a far cry from the angulated, barrel-chested, sloping back, ataxic, 85-pounders  (38 kg) we are used to seeing in the conformation ring. There was a time when the GSD could clear a 2.5 meter (8.5 ft) wall; that time is long gone.

The Pug is another extreme brachycephalic breed and it has all the problems associated with that trait – high blood pressure, heart problems, low oxygenation, difficulty breathing, tendency to overheat, dentition problems, and skin fold dermatitis. The highly desirable double-curl tail is actually a genetic defect, in more serious forms it leads to paralysis.

Once a noble working dog, the modern St. Bernard has been oversized, had its faced squished in, and bred for abundant skin. You will not see this type of dog working, they can’t handle it as they quickly overheat. The diseases include entropion, ectropion, Stockard’s paralysis, hemophilia, osteosarcoma, aphakia, fibrinogen deficiency.

[…] No dog breed has ever been improved by the capricious and arbitrary decision that a shorter/longer/flatter/bigger/smaller/curlier “whatever” is better.  Condemning a dog to a lifetime of suffering for the sake of looks is not an improvement; it is torture.

-dogbehaviourscience

 


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