She says she’s happy. I bet she is. Pity it won’t last

Jacinda Ardern opened her first press conference as NZ’s Prime Minister-elect by acknowledging her predecessor in the role, National leader Bill English.

“I want to thank Bill English for the role he has played in this campaign but also as prime minister and as serving in the past as NZ’s finance minister,” she said.

“Mr English has already called me this evening and acknowledged that negotiations for the National Party have now concluded.”

The Greens are expected to back Labour on confidence and supply, giving the combined parties, along with NZ First, 63 seats, two more than the 61 majority they need.

Stepping into Government brings the left out of the cold of opposition for the first time in nine years.

Labour will hold a caucus meeting on Friday morning to select a cabinet.

Four places will go to NZ First MPs while they will also have a parliamentary undersecretary.

Peters has been offered the role of deputy prime minister, pushing aside Labour’s deputy Kelvin Davis, but Ardern said he was still considering whether to take up that offer.

The Green Party is still working to finalise its involvement in the government arrangement, Ardern said.

May you live in interesting times.

 

– NZ Herald


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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