Fat Tony assists Nats who are still bewildered by the election result

Mike “Fat Tony” Williams explains a few home truths to slow Nat supporters still struggling with the election result:

As a tumultuous year in politics finally begins to wind down, the award for the silliest piece of political writing was at the last moment snatched away from all of those academics and political commentators who confidently predicted a fourth term for the National-led government by a sublime piece of one-eyed claptrap.

Please imagine a short drum roll.

The award for transcendent journalistic idiocy for 2017 goes to the anonymous leader writer who penned the following (and got it past the normally vigilant producers of what is usually a credible publication).

“The National Party has had a month to get over the disappointment of winning the general election but losing the partners it needed to continue governing.” You may want to read that paragraph again.

Yes, our valedictorian is telling us that the National Party won the 2017 election. This would be news to Bill English who is no longer Prime Minister and to Jacinda Ardern who is.

Mile Williams is of course talking about the NZ Herald…and whoever wrote the editorial on 28 November.

It will also be a revelation to all of those National Party, Maori Party and United Future ministers with slashed salaries who are doing without their posh offices, state-funded Wellington houses and 24/7 limo services and to the Labour, New Zealand First and Green Party ministers who have inherited all of those goodies.

It would also be news to the Governor-General who accepted Jacinda Ardern’s assurance that she could command a majority in Parliament and appointed her PM.

This assertion is, of course, partisan nonsense.

It’s unbecoming of a major publication and at the very least reveals an appalling and unforgiveable ignorance of how our political system works and has worked since the advent of the Mixed Member Proportional system of electing our Parliament 21 years ago.

Although the quote above was published behind the veil of anonymity, this sounds very much like to work of a columnist who, whenever the National Party dipped in the polls in recent years, wrote pieces asserting that the party with the most votes inevitably had some kind of moral right to govern.

I thought I’d corrected this particular piece of ignorance some years ago by sending this person the results of a German state election where the Social Democrat and Greens Parties formed a government after coming second and third behind the Christian Democrats.

If it is, indeed, the same scribbler, further education on the definition of what is a “win” in politics may be necessary.

If we have butchered the definition of winning an election to mean simply getting a plurality or more votes than anyone else then Hilary Clinton won the US Presidency last year and Bill Rowling’s Labour Party won general elections in 1978 and 1981.

As the redoubtable Sir Robert Muldoon once informed us after one of these polls, it’s really quite simple; if you want to know who won, just look at who’s the Prime Minister.

Sadly, some in National still don’t grasp this little fact, including Bill English, Paula Bennett and Nick Smith.

Muldoon’s advice was a sensible then as it is now.

 

-HB Today


Do you want:

  • Ad-free access?
  • Access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • Access to daily sudoku?
  • Access to Incite Politics magazine articles?
  • Access to podcasts?
  • Access to political polls?

Our subscribers’ financial support is the reason why we have been able to offer our latest service; Audio blogs. 

Click Here  to support us and watch the number of services grow.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

33%