The Labour government’s pattern of behaviour

I am seeing a pattern of behaviour from our new government that started with how they dealt with child ” poverddy” and now has continued with how they are dealing with the Meth Testing of State houses. The pattern is a simple one. If the current method of assessing the issue is giving results that don’t make the government look good or give them a result that they don’t want they change the method of assessment.

Housing Minister Phil Twyford isn’t ruling out compensation for Housing New Zealand tenants judged to have been wrongly evicted because traces of methamphetamine were detected in their home.

He said the Government priority was to sort out a testing standard and set clear guidelines to give landlords in the private and public sector some certainty.

It will be a testing standard that raises the level of meth contamination that is acceptable. As a landlord, I wouldn’t care if they smoked a single P-pipe or had a kitchen lab on my property the result would be the same. No level of Meth contamination is acceptable because no landlord wants people associated with the P-trade living inside their investment.

“There has been a moral panic around this whole issue that I think was a result of the vacuum in political leadership under the former government.”

A Moral panic? Meth is one of the most harmful drugs that I know of. It destroys people and their families because it is so addictive. Children and adults will burgle houses to pay for their next hit and children and mothers alike will prostitute themselves to feed their addiction. A meth addicted tenant will be associated with crime, there is no doubt about it.

He also said drug detection companies were partly to blame for the “moral panic”.
Twyford said about 900 state houses had been vacated in the midst of a housing crisis because of a meth contamination standard that could not adequately tell if a property posed a risk, or if there was an infinitesimally small residue that posed no risk at all.

He believed most of those houses would be found to be perfectly safe.

And what does he base that belief on? Wishful thinking?

He had asked officials for advice on whether the current standard or threshold for contamination was set at the right level. A new standard could be set within months.

This may be politician speak for, I have told them that the current standard is too strict and I want it relaxed so that we can put people back inside those 900 State houses asap.

[…] National’s housing spokesman Michael Woodhouse said his predecessor was already working on a new standard.

“I haven’t seen exactly what Mr Twyford has said about that, but it would be nothing new. I think we realised that the thresholds for meth testing was set a little high and we needed to come to a sensible arrangement.

“It is ultimately up to the public policy makers to set the thresholds and we certainly identified an issue as the previous Government that was being worked on.”

Was the issue public health or was the issue public housing? I can’t help but wonder if both political parties are more concerned about providing state housing than they are with keeping the public safe and evicting drug addicted tenants.

Standards NZ released a new meth testing standard this year, raising the maximum acceptable level of meth contamination to 1.5mcg per 100cm2.

The NZ Drug Foundation has called the industry that has grown around meth testing and clean-up “the biggest scam this country has ever seen”.

Would you be okay with a tenant or their friends smoking meth in your property as long as they kept the contamination down to 1.5mcg per 100cm2?

-NZ Herald

meth user


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If you agree with me that’s nice but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo. Look between the lines, do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

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