The longer it goes on the more people will realise that Ardern’s promise to not lie was hollow

Jacinda Ardern said that she doesn’t lie, and wouldn’t lie. But the more the shenanigans goes on over the release of the multi-page secret coalition agreement the more Labour and Ardern are damaging their claims to be honest brokers and transparent.

Honesty and transparency were the brands that they pushed during the election, and Labour has made much of John Key’s apparent lying. Now the boot is on the other foot and they’ve commenced with their obfuscations from the get go.

For a Government vowing to be the most transparent and open the country has ever seen, it really did get stuck in the mud this week. 

That 38-page secret coalition document that’s stored in a not-so-secret safe in Winston Peters’ office has caused all sorts of headaches, for the prime minister in particular, who has been visibly frustrated about the position she’s been put in.

On Monday, it was revealed the prime minister’s office was refusing to release the document that NZ First leader and deputy prime minister Peters had previously described as “a document of precision on various areas of policy commitment and development”.

The longer it goes on the more the mud sticks, it is already a morass up to their ankles and sucking their gum boots off. They have no one to blame but themselves.

So why has the Government spent the whole week battling headlines on this and undergoing forensic-style questioning in the House over who did and didn’t have access to the document, and other trivial matters like its font size?

Because Ardern resorted to a political operative approach rather than the one she’s better known for, honesty.

Over time, former prime minister John Key nailed the art of just saying he got it wrong, throwing his hands in the air, shrugging his shoulders and moving on.

The public appetite for that approach far exceeds the spin-doctoring one that was used this week by the Government.

Her honesty card has been handed in, now she is sneaky, furtive and obfuscatory.

The excuses used by Leader of the House Chris Hipkins and Ardern for why they ended up giving unnecessary select committee concessions to National because they didn’t know their numbers in the House were simply farcical.

Their insistence it was better to give National concessions and avoid a vote for Speaker Trevor Mallard to ensure he was elected unanimously was utter nonsense.

The Government would have saved themselves weeks of headlines if they’d just admitted they weren’t 100 per cent sure of their numbers, asked for a vote and come out the other end with their Speaker and their integrity intact.

Silly stuff from the boy wonder, who is proving to be as inept as everyone thought, along with a number of other Labour ministers.

They are so full of themselves and believe their own spin about how competent they are, but they are making amateur mistakes.

What is becoming increasingly obvious is that Labour had no plan to govern, all they had were a collection of bumper sticker slogans and they’ve been paddling furiously ever since up Shit Creek.

 

-Fairfax


Do you want:

  • Ad-free access?
  • Access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • Access to Incite Politics magazine articles?
  • Access to Podcasts?
  • Access to Political Polls?

Our subscribers’ financial support is the reason why we have been able to offer our latest service; Audio blogs. 

Click Here  to support us and watch the number of services grow.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

41%