Operation Pied Piper vs Golly-G’s war stories

Guest Post

Operation Pied Piper swung into action on 1st September 1939; two days before a state of war was declared by both Britain and France against Nazi Germany.

Many more operations were to come over the next six years, thousands of them, but Operation Pied Piper was the first and foremost and its mission had a single purpose: to protect children.

Nazi Germany’s contribution towards assisting Franco’s fascists during the brutal Spanish Civil War in the years immediately preceding had been the all-powerful Luftwaffe, the German Air Force, and their tactics of bombing civilian targets chilled the British leadership. They knew full well that the very same deplorable tactic, used to induce panic and fear, would be re-employed to intimidate the British public, and they were right. The enemy would send countless waves of bombers, bomb-equipped fighters and the world’s first long-range missiles to wreak havoc, both upon British cities, and British morale.   

Life had to go on, civilians would need to tough it out, famously “Keep Calm and Carry On”. But Britain determined that children must be moved from harm’s way whenever and wherever possible. Under Operation Pied Piper millions of children were evacuated from danger, some as far away as New Zealand:

 

More than a million mothers bid their babies farewell; this was, understandably, a huge emotional blow for those women, but softened in the absolute certainty that they were doing the right thing. Still, some weakened and longed for their children back, the Ministry of Health ran a campaign against such sentiment; urging those women not to give in, not to take them back to the unsafe cities. Places where instant death could arrive on any night; randomly and callously.

Operation Pied Piper reminds us of the perils of war, how it affects everything and forces upon us decisions we don’t want to make, and about mother’s love and what a terribly difficult choice it was for them: but the urge to remove children from danger is a primal maternal impetus, it is a mother’s instinct. The head rules the heart in times of such huge anxiety.

Golriz Ghahraman aged attending school in Iran Source/ Facebook

This makes Green MP Ms Ghahraman’s claims of being ferried as a tiny tot from an area of practical safety to one of huge danger; a prime target during a period of aerial bombardment by the enemy, more-than slightly suspicious. It seems like a square peg of recklessness, foolhardiness and stupidity, being forced into a round hole of feminine instinct, logic and maternity.

Maybe the story is completely true; I don’t know. But what I do know, having met many mothers, even once having one of my own, is that I simply do not believe her.

 

-idbkiwi

 


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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