Shabby nasty hit job from NZ Herald

The NZ Herald continues to mount shabby, nasty little hit jobs on Todd Barclay.

Kirsty Wynn writes:

Disgraced MP Todd Barclay has just enjoyed a two-month sun-filled tour of Italy, Croatia and Greece all while receiving a $3000 a week taxpayer-funded pay packet.

The former National MP announced in June he would not stand again after the “phone tapping” scandal – but under Parliament’s rules he still receives his salary until December 23.

That means Barclay will have pocketed a total of $80,000 of taxpayer money, before tax, over six months.

It’s unclear what work he has done since June – Parliamentary Services, which administers politicians’ funding entitlements, was unable to say how many days he had been in Parliament or whether he had claimed any expenses.

Look at the pejorative approach of Wynn’s writing. MPs are paid whether or not they are in parliament, and they are also paid for 3 months after the end of parliament. That is the pay package they get. This is not news.

Every other retiring MP and any who lost their seats are also paid the same. Where are the gushing negative articles about disgraced former Green MP Metiria Turei, who unlike Barclay who has been cleared by Police, is still under active investigation for her alleged fraud and theft from Work and Income. Not a mutter, not a murmur from media.

This week it was reported that Barclay had taken a job with the Japanese owners of Queenstown’s Millbrook Resort, the Ishii family. His London-based role is as international business affairs secretary for the family’s Japanese design and software company, Too Corporation, Mountain Scene reported.

So what? Good on him, shows he is employable, unlike some other MPs I could name.

Under Parliamentary policy someone who retired would still be paid until three months after polling day – up to December 23.

All 34 MPs who resigned or lost their seats at the 2017 election still get paid for three months – about $40,000 in total, or $3300 a week, before tax.

Former MPs and party leaders Peter Dunne and Te Ururoa Flavell defended Barclay, saying departed MPs have an entitlement and how they use it is their business.

Te Ururoa Flavell said despite the circumstances Barclay was entitled to his salary and “it was up to the individual concerned how they spend their money”.

Dunne said MPs ceased to be employed on election night.

He had “been at home re-establishing himself” since election night but said Barclay was free to do what he wanted.

“Like all MPs he ceased to be a member of Parliament at midnight on election night, after that he is a private citizen.

“That’s his life and responsibility and good on him for getting on with it. I think in his circumstances to get right out of New Zealand was the right thing to do.”

Dunne is actually right on this, and he is also in receipt of 3 months pay.

This is a nasty shabby attack by the Herald. It shows their political bias clearly. What is also clear is they are happily trawling through his Facebook page trying desperately to dig up dirt on him. It is pathetic.

Perhaps we should start digging into the personal holidays and predilections of some of these journalists. They’ll scream “Privacy!” but it doesn’t stop them doing over other people.

 

-NZ Herald


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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