New York Magazine publishes a movie script masquerading as investigative journalism

As I read the article about President Trump in New York Magazine a movie script immediately sprang to mind called Brewsters Millions. In the movie, Brewster had to spend 30 million dollars in a way that would ensure that he would fail in everything that he did and would lose all the money. If he succeeded in his mission he would be given billions as his prize.

He started off investing in speculative gold mines and other unlikely money making schemes but they kept finding gold and being successful so he decided to go into politics instead. There he reasoned he could easily spend all his money and ensure that he would fail thereby losing all the money easily.

The New York magazine’s entire premise in their extraordinary article is that President Trump never intended to win the presidency and that he wasted all that money because he thought that it would lead to a lucrative outcome for him as a businessman after he lost the election.

It is an extraordinary claim to make and one of their key pieces of evidence in their attempt to frame that narrative is that Trump got other people to invest in his campaign rather than bankrolling it himself. I think that is actually why he won as in New Zealand when wealthy millionaires have bankrolled their own political campaigns it has always ended in failure as it is a one-man band rather than a genuine campaign where the candidate is supported by others who believe in him.

As the campaign came to an end, Trump himself was sanguine. His ultimate goal, after all, had never been to win. “I can be the most famous man in the world,” he had told his aide Sam Nunberg at the outset of the race. His longtime friend Roger Ailes, the former head of Fox News, liked to say that if you want a career in television, first run for president. Now Trump, encouraged by Ailes, was floating rumors about a Trump network. It was a great future. He would come out of this campaign, Trump assured Ailes, with a far more powerful brand and untold opportunities.

“This is bigger than I ever dreamed of,” he told Ailes a week before the election. “I don’t think about losing, because it isn’t losing. We’ve totally won.”[…]

[…] He was baffled when the right-wing billionaire Robert Mercer, a Ted Cruz backer whom Trump barely knew, offered him an infusion of $5 million. When Mercer and his daughter Rebekah presented their plan to take over the campaign and install their lieutenants, Steve Bannon and Conway, Trump didn’t resist. He only expressed vast incomprehension about why anyone would want to do that. […]

Bannon, who became chief executive of Trump’s team in mid-August, called it “the broke-dick campaign.” Almost immediately, he saw that it was hampered by an even deeper structural flaw: The candidate who billed himself as a billionaire — ten times over — refused to invest his own money in it. Bannon told Kushner that, after the first debate in September, they would need another $50 million to cover them until Election Day.

“No way we’ll get 50 million unless we can guarantee him victory,” said a clear-eyed Kushner.

“Twenty-five million?” prodded Bannon.

“If we can say victory is more than likely.”

In the end, the best Trump would do is to loan the campaign $10 million, provided he got it back as soon as they could raise other money.[…]

[…] Once he lost, Trump would be both insanely famous and a martyr to Crooked Hillary. His daughter Ivanka and son-in-law Jared would be international celebrities. Steve Bannon would become the de facto head of the tea-party movement. Kellyanne Conway would be a cable-news star. Melania Trump, who had been assured by her husband that he wouldn’t become president, could return to inconspicuously lunching. Losing would work out for everybody. Losing was winning.

Shortly after 8 p.m. on Election Night, when the unexpected trend — Trump might actually win — seemed confirmed, Don Jr. told a friend that his father, or DJT, as he calls him, looked as if he had seen a ghost. Melania was in tears — and not of joy.

There was, in the space of little more than an hour, in Steve Bannon’s not unamused observation, a befuddled Trump morphing into a disbelieving Trump and then into a horrified Trump. But still to come was the final transformation: Suddenly, Donald Trump became a man who believed that he deserved to be, and was wholly capable of being, the president of the United States.[…]

[…] This was a real-life version of Mel Brooks’s The Producers, where the mistaken outcome trusted by everyone in Trump’s inner circle — that they would lose the election — wound up exposing them for who they really were.

[…] Bannon was curiously able to embrace Trump while at the same time suggesting he did not take him entirely seriously. Great numbers of people, he believed, were suddenly receptive to a new message — the world needs borders — and Trump had become the platform for that message.[…]

The entire article attempts to paint Trump as a bumbling, naive fool despised by men he admired like Media mogul Rupert Murdoch and controlled by the former editor of the new media website Breitbart, Steve Bannon. We are expected to believe by the end of the article that Trump went through an incredibly emotionally draining and rigorous election campaign simply to raise his own profile and that he never had any intention of winning.


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If you agree with me that’s nice but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo. Look between the lines, do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

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