Banning Plastic Bags is Garbage

Hide your garbage bins, the Bag Police are on the job. Photo by: James Tourtellotte/Wikimedia Commons.

As everyone knows, nanny-state environmental diktats always work flawlessly, and never have unintended consequences.

Except …

Single-use plastic bags ban under scrutiny as shoppers switch and ditch reusables

Australian states with bans in place see rise in consumers and retailers resorting to thicker bags to escape the rule

Like many people, I suspect, we found so-called “single-use” plastic bags to be anything but. A home-made “bag-bag” – basically a cloth tube with elasticated opening – hangs inside our back door, stuffed with old shopping bags, ready to be re-used.

But such home-spun innovation isn’t good enough for Green wowsers. Instead, the heavy hand of the nanny-state was brought down on such a practical example of the Greens’ Re-use mantra.

Instead, lightweight plastic bags were outright banned in several Australian states. Because there’s nothing a Green loves more than a good ban.

What happened next:

The Australian Capital Territory requested an investigation into the use of thicker plastic bags last month, after reports that retailers and consumers had simply switched their plastic bag consumption to thicker bags to escape the ban.

While in Tasmania:

“It would appear that there has been an increase in the volume of a thicker type of single-use bag …”

Gosh. No-one could have seen that coming. Plastic bags are useful. We re-use them for everything from bagging up dog poo in the backyard, to just carrying stuff around. Denied a ready supply of lightweight bags, ready to be re-used after they’ve carted groceries home, what did the greenie numpties think people were going to do?

Was there any need for the ban, anyway? Despite the greenies’ pearl-clutching about a shopping bag-caused environmental apocalypse:

“Plastic shopping bags are a very, very tiny proportion of the plastics going into landfill,” [Deakin University waste expert Trevor Thornton] told Guardian Australia. “Banning plastic bags is not necessarily always the best environmental outcome.”

Well, duh. As Choice magazine discovered:

recycled high-density polyethylene (HDPE) bags come out best for their low environmental impact … This is a lightweight plastic that the vast majority of single-use plastic bags are made from

Meanwhile, the hippies’ virtue-signalling favourites, paper and biodegradable starch, are last on Choice’s list for low environmental impact, while:

A green bag has to be used more than 23 times before it becomes a better option than single-use bags … Calico bags aren’t recommended, because of the amount of water used to make them

So, it appears that the wicked, plastic-bag-using consumers were on the right track, while the smug, green elites were making the worst environmental choices. Again.

Not that they’ll ever admit that, though. Instead, they just continue to wag their fingers at the hoi polloi.

The ACT climate change and sustainability minister, Shane Rattenbury … said he was considering expanding the ban to include thicker bags.

What’s the old wisdom about doing the same thing, and expecting different results? Wisdom, though, is not something greens are familiar with. Instead, like good Marxists, if the theory fails, it only means they have to hammer people harder.

We want to fix this … future initiatives should examine how also to change bin-lining behaviour

Viz comic used to have a famous strip, The Bottom Inspectors. Perhaps the greenies will create an Office of Bin-Lining Inspectors. Shoppers will live in terror of a midnight raid by the bin-bag police. Recalcitrant plastic bag users will be sent to Gul-bags, where they will sew calico bags in between re-education sessions.

The glorious green future awaits! We have nothing to lose but our plastic bags.

– The Guardian


Do you want:

  • Ad-free access?
  • Access to our very popular daily crossword?
  • Access to daily sudoku?
  • Access to Incite Politics magazine articles?
  • Access to podcasts?
  • Access to political polls?

Our subscribers’ financial support is the reason why we have been able to offer our latest service; Audio blogs. 

Click Here  to support us and watch the number of services grow.

Who is Lushington D. Brady?

Well, a pseudonym. Obviously.

But the name Lushington Dalrymple Brady has been chosen carefully. Not only for the sum of its overall mien of seedy gentility, reminiscent perhaps of a slightly disreputable gentlemen of letters, but also for its parts, each of which borrows from the name of a Vandemonian of more-or-less fame (or notoriety) who represents some admirable quality which will hopefully animate the persona of Lushington D. Brady.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

48%