Book Review of the Day – Night after Night

You can help. Send your book review to [email protected] and we will put it up when it is your turn. Please set your submission out with the name of the book, then the author and then describe in your own words what the book is about. Also if you happen to be a commenter please include your username.

This year we are going to review books daily until the reviews run out. By doing this for individual books this gives people a chance to do their own research on the books and authors by using the links provided and not miss out by being bombarded by a whole lot at once like we have done in previous years.

Each post is set out as comprehensively as possible with the name of who submitted it, the name of the book and author and a short review in the form of a comment from whoever submitted it.

Todays review came from Jonathan


Night after Night by Max Lambert

Jonathan said: “The role of Bomber Command and the use of area bombing in defeating Hitler’s Germany has become one of the most contentious aspects of allied war planning. However, as an amateur military historian, I feel that questioning the use of area bombing is a luxury we enjoy precisely because young men were prepared to strap themselves into Wellingtons, Hampdens, Stirlings, Halifaxes and Lancasters and subject themselves to operational stresses that we can scarcely imagine, suffering a horrific attrition rate to help defeat Nazism and win the war.

One book that does a great deal to help understand what it was like on operations is Night after Night. It’s the stories of New Zealanders in Bomber Command, collected by Max Lambert from surviving aircrew and so provides a unique insight into what it was like to climb into your aircraft, night after night, and fly on operations. The great narrative text follows the linear course of the war, and takes the reader from training through to operations and the end of the War. The text is peppered with quotes and reminisces from the aircrew about their experiences in combat, in squadron life and as POWs.

A thoroughly good read and highly recommended.

There were no reviews from Amazon for this book.

If you have read this book or it reminds you of a story or something ele then please go ahead and share in the comments section below.



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