The Media Just Love To Promote People They Claim To Hate

Hold on, kids: Trevor Noah is on the phone.

Satire is one of the most potent weapons writers can wield. Satire hits right at the heart of affairs and makes the most powerful look silly. This is why, for instance, bards were sacred in many cultures: even the mighty were afraid of being made fun of.

Despite their delusions, the current crop of late-night tv “comedians” are not satirists. Telling people what they already think and gurning at the camera as a cue to applaud isn’t satire. Satire engenders a gasp of shock, followed by a good belly-laugh. An audience whooping and applauding at having their own opinions telegraphed back to them isn’t satire.

The Onion is one of the few genuinely satirical outlets in the U.S. today. Their headlines alone are often masterpieces.

White Supremacist Tired After Long Day Of Interviews With Mainstream News Outlets

White supremacist Bryan McCafferty was reportedly exhausted Thursday after a long day of interviews with mainstream news outlets. “God, I really want to just get home and sleep, but I still have a sit-down with the New York Times at 7:30, and my CNN segment is filming right after at nine,” said McCafferty, lamenting that he didn’t have a spare minute to finish email correspondences about rural neo-Nazis with NPR and PBS NewsHour because a Salon reporter accompanied him this week to better understand his hatred of black and Hispanic neighbors.

Remembering that brevity is the soul of wit, with just a headline and two sentences, the Onion strikes at the heart of the mainstream media’s duplicity. Even as the media clutch their pearls about “racism”, they repeatedly give a vanishingly small clique of extremists the sort of publicity that money can’t buy.

“Don’t get me wrong, I’m excited to spread the message of a white ethnostate, but I just can’t do any more phone interviews with Chris Hayes or Jake Tapper while I’m driving my kids to school.”

The same media which piously refuses to even name Islamic terrorism, “because it just plays into their hands”, dutifully wheels out an irrelevant nobody like David Duke, time and time again.

The Charlottesville riots are a perfect example. A tiny cabal of actual white supremacists – less than several hundred – wanted to gather at an obscure Southern town. If no-one had paid them any attention, they’d have had their little white supremacy parade, maybe disrupted traffic for a couple of hours, and gone home.

But, no. Giddily excited at the prospect of finally finding some actual racists, the hypocritical mainstream media beat the thing like a drum. With the result that thousands of counter-protesters swooped, along with the Communist thugs Antifa, just as excited as the media to be seen “fighting white supremacy”.

With negligent local authorities thrown into the mix, the result was deadly chaos.

As the rapper and anarcho-capitalist activist, Eric July says, “You got maybe a hundred white guys in polo shirts, marching in some town you couldn’t even find on a map, and y’all acting like it’s the end of the world”.

Think instead, July says, of the everyday interactions people have with hundreds, maybe thousands of others, of all colours and beliefs, without incident. That’s the real America, he says. The white supremacists are irrelevant.

Nobody would care, let alone know about them if an over-excited, hypocritical media wouldn’t keep giving them free publicity.

The Onion: Truly, America’s Finest News Source.


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Who is Lushington D. Brady?

Well, a pseudonym. Obviously.

But the name Lushington Dalrymple Brady has been chosen carefully. Not only for the sum of its overall mien of seedy gentility, reminiscent perhaps of a slightly disreputable gentlemen of letters, but also for its parts, each of which borrows from the name of a Vandemonian of more-or-less fame (or notoriety) who represents some admirable quality which will hopefully animate the persona of Lushington D. Brady.

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