Racism is bad – but only when the racist is white

Good luck getting away with this if you’re white: “Soldado Micolta”, a popular character on Colombian television. Pic: las2orillas.co

In December 2017, a California high school girl posted a racist rant on Snapchat, relating that black people were ugly, couldn’t be her friends, and “need to die”.

She also explained how happy it made her when police shot black people.

But, as David Cole notes, aside from some cursory local coverage, the incident barely made a ripple in the American media. Which is odd, because even making a mildly offensive joke on Twitter these days can become a national scandal.

But there was a very simple reason that a genocidally racist diatribe on social media passed by America’s race-obssessed media with just cursory interest.

The girl who recorded the video isn’t white. She’s Latina. So the national media had no interest.

Yet when a black student at the same school, related her stories of alleged racist terror, which she claimed were all committed by white students, the media went wild.

This is the leftist media’s standard operating procedure.

Sit on anything that makes brown folks look bad, and wait for (or create) an angle that will allow you to pin it all on whitey.

Even more importantly, the story illustrates a trend that can only intensify as America’s Hispanic population booms, thanks to the immigration – both legal and not – and open borders policies favoured by liberals.

Hispanics, in general, have little love for blacks. The more Hispanics we have in this country … the more we’ll see antiblack “incidents” caused by Hispanics.

In 1997, years of verbal harassment, violence and firebombing directed against blacks in LA by Hispanics culminated in the mob lynching of Virgil Henry.

LA Times journalist Agustin Gurza reported:

He tripped trying to flee, and was set upon by at least 10 attackers, men and women, adults and teenagers. Except for one detail, they could have been perpetrators in an old-fashioned lynching

But this wasn’t Alabama of the Old South. It’s contemporary Southern California. And the members of the mob were not whites. They were Latinos.

In an era when even the shooting of a black criminal by police results in days of riots and the launch of a radical political movement, one would have expected such a story to obsess the American media for weeks, if not years.

But …

The murder of Virgil Henry did not make the papers …

According to Gurza:

Latinos must face up to the harsh truth we have been keeping as our dirty family secret. As a group, we are deeply, virulently racist …

We even treat our own children differently, depending on whether they turn out gueritos or prietitos—fair-skinned like the Spaniards or with dark complexions like the Indians…. I’ve known Mexican parents willing to disinherit their sons and daughters over interracial relationships.

But this is of no interest to the “social justice” mob. As Cole says, the leftist obsession with racism is all about attacking white people, not helping black people. SJWs can sniff out “racism” everywhere white people are, but they are utterly blind to actual racism from any other group. That’s why, dressed in idiotic “pussy hats”, they cluelessly march to the beat of BLM – “the black Klan”, as Derrick Pilot calls them, and viciously anti-Semitic Islamists.

Anyone with half a brain can see that the media and the social justice thugs aren’t fighting honestly or with noble intentions. It’s just race-hate in the name of fighting race-hate

– Takimag


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Who is Lushington D. Brady?

Well, a pseudonym. Obviously.

But the name Lushington Dalrymple Brady has been chosen carefully. Not only for the sum of its overall mien of seedy gentility, reminiscent perhaps of a slightly disreputable gentlemen of letters, but also for its parts, each of which borrows from the name of a Vandemonian of more-or-less fame (or notoriety) who represents some admirable quality which will hopefully animate the persona of Lushington D. Brady.

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