It’s time to get rid of the term ‘hate speech’

I am guilty of using the term ‘hate speech’ because I like to use the left’s own made-up terms against them. I tend to use the terms when pointing out that they are doing what they have accused others of doing. When they attack white males, for example, for their gender and their skin colour I like to point out that they would condemn those exact same words if the target was not white and not male.

Hate speech, though, is as made up a term as Islamophobia and is used as a rod to beat ‘free speech’ with. It was created to be held up as the opposite of free speech, just as sweet is the opposite of sour, but it isn’t the opposite at all. The opposite of free speech is ‘illegal speech’ as only speech prohibited by law is not free. In New Zealand, we still have the freedom to…

  • Say, write or draw things that people don’t like
  • Say, write or draw things that upset people
  • Say, write or draw things that shock people
  • Say, write or draw things that people disagree with
  • Say, write or draw things that people are offended by.

Our freedom is only restricted by our laws. I may be able to say, write or draw a satirical piece but if I write or draw it on another person’s property, ie wall, house, car etc then it is no longer free as I have broken the law.

If I say, write or draw something to directly tell people to be violent or to kill a person or a group of people then I have crossed a legal line and have broken the law.

[…] Labour MP Louisa Wall claimed the cartoons had breached the Human Rights Act by showing Maori and Pasifika as “welfare bludgers and negligent parents”. This week a High Court judgement said the cartoons were “objectively offensive” but not actually illegal  because they didn’t hurdle the high bar of exciting hostility or contempt.

On this blog, we have pointed out offensive things being said by a man we called a ‘Hate preacher’. We provided video evidence of the kinds of things he was saying but even though we disagreed with what he was saying. even though we didn’t like it, even though we were upset that he was preaching those kinds of things to those who attend his mosque, he had not broken any New Zealand laws so he was free to say what he said.

The great thing about free speech is that we enjoy the same freedom of speech as him and we were, therefore, able to tell New Zealand what he was saying and were able to shine sunlight on him and his mosque.

Free speech is our most precious freedom. Hate speech should be removed as a term because it was only invented in order to be used as an excuse to restrict our freedom of speech. The answer to so-called hate speech is more free speech. Once we start restricting what we can and can’t say based on people’s feelings we lose our freedom and end up under a totalitarian jackboot.


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If you agree with me that’s nice but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo. Look between the lines, do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.