Trump Derangement Syndrome in action

The genetic fallacy is a well-known failure of criticial thinking in which the validity of a claim is judged solely by its origin. Trump Derangement Syndrome is soaked with the genetic fallacy.

Listening to someone criticising Trump’s foreign policy recently, my youngest, having studied international relations, commented that what Trump said was actually consistent with decades of U.S. foreign policy. Indeed, Trump was often in line with what his opponents had also previously said. People were losing their minds, just because it was Donald Trump, he said.

Following Trump’s State of the Union (SOTU) address, Cabot Phillips of Campus Reform conducted an experiment to demonstrate the effects of Trump Derangement Syndrome. At John Jay College, Phillips asked people for their opinions of what, he said, were quotes from Trump’s SOTU.

What he didn’t tell them was that the quotes were actually from Obama’s SOTU addresses.

The reactions were as illuminating as they were predictable.

Still, it was heartening to see that, when confronted with the truth, some chose to reflect on their attitude:

I guess bias is really bad, in general. Just because you don’t agree with it, doesn’t mean it’s not right.

I am definitely not a huge fan of him, however, I think being close-minded is more dangerous than anything he could do.

Some are quick to judge Donald Trump, just because of a few things that he says, but I think, if they paid attention to his whole Presidency, maybe they’d have a better outlook on him, and a better perspective in general.

If only the mainstream American media were so self-aware.


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Who is Lushington D. Brady?

Well, a pseudonym. Obviously.

But the name Lushington Dalrymple Brady has been chosen carefully. Not only for the sum of its overall mien of seedy gentility, reminiscent perhaps of a slightly disreputable gentlemen of letters, but also for its parts, each of which borrows from the name of a Vandemonian of more-or-less fame (or notoriety) who represents some admirable quality which will hopefully animate the persona of Lushington D. Brady.

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