The most inappropriate spokesperson in the entire world: Golriz Ghahraman

PHOTO: Golriz was part of the team that defended singer and songwriter Bikindi who was accused and later convicted of inciting genocide.

Green list MP Golriz Ghahraman it seems will do anything to get media attention and will show up to the opening of an envelope in order to boost her profile. However, this time she has truly outdone herself. She has waded into a debate that she is totally unfit to comment on. If I was a reporter looking for a comment from an MP she would be the last MP on earth that I would ask.

Why?

Because the person behind the local news story is a Rwandan genocide survivor.

Ghahraman upset Rwandan genocide survivors with her claims and comments about the genocide which is why GAERG (which is an organisation founded by former student Genocide survivors) sent a letter inviting her to Rwanda to give her an opportunity to visit the numerous memorial sites and to have a ‘constructive dialogue.’ She declined their offer.

Despite this background, she had the absolute gall to  wade into the debate and accuse the Middleton Grange School of going ‘one step too far.’

[…] Christchurch’s Middleton Grange School, in Upper Riccarton, asked children to wear “old ragged clothes” to a mufti day on Thursday to raise money for World Vision.

“A good way to develop understanding and compassion is to experience a little of what it feels like to be poor,” a newsletter advising parents of the event said.

While the idea fell foul of some parents, the school said the student-led initiative was bolstered by class discussions about the challenges refugees faced fleeing persecution or war.

“For us, success is not measured by how much money we raised, but by bringing into the primary children’s understanding a greater awareness of the harsh and difficult realities for children in other parts of the world,” principal Richard Vanderpyl said.

Caroline Akui said encouraging people to dress in rags diminished the hardships faced by refugees and could be triggering for people who had fled dangerous countries.

[…] Parents and a Rwandan genocide survivor, who contacted the school, felt the school had dismissed their concerns, Akui said.

The refugee theme came from the school’s junior student council, and three-quarters of primary school students dressed up to “show their empathy and support for the children of Syria”.

Green Party MP Golriz Ghahraman, an Iranian-Kiwi refugee, said the school meant well but “went one step too far”.

“The offence comes from where they said the children should dress in rags, which is presuming something about refugees . . . a lot of refugee children are fleeing religious persecution, for example.

“This kind of highlights for me a misunderstanding in the definition of who refugees are. The definition of a refugee child is Anne Frank,” Ghahraman said, explaining the word’s origins in the Holocaust.

Yeah, and when Ghahramin defended genocidaire Bikindi, her C.Vs portrayal of her as a noble defender of victims’ human rights was as credible as those who defended the Nazis at the Nuremberg trials.

A spokeswoman for World Vision New Zealand said Middleton Grange had supported the charity for many years, and raised an “incredible” $950,000 through participation in the 40 Hour Famine.

“Each school uses their own initiatives to fundraise [for World Vision] . . . We know that Middleton Grange has acted with the very best intentions.

“We admire their commitment to working with their students to develop understanding and compassion for children living in poverty.”[…]

 

 – Stuff

 


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