Apparently handguns aren’t restricted in NZ, according to professional liar Golriz Ghahraman

Golriz Ghahraman is a lying piece of work. After her falsified CV you’d think she would shut her lying mouth. But no.

Watch the video above where she states that “handguns are not actually really regulated at all.”

You know she is lying when she says things because she giggles or laughs as she speaks the lie. This is an a bare-faced lie as handguns are actually heavily regulated in New Zealand.

In order to own a handgun you must belong to a certified pistol club. That is required by law. Section 29(2) of the Arms Act specifies:

2) Any person, being an applicant for a firearms licence or a holder of a firearms licence, may apply at an Arms Office to a member of the Police for an endorsement permitting that person to have possession of a pistol or a restricted weapon (other than an anti-personnel mine or a cluster munition) in his capacity as—
(a) a member of an incorporated pistol shooting club for the time being recognised by the Commissioner for the purposes of this section; or
(b) a bona fide collector of firearms; or
(c) a person to whom the pistol or restricted weapon has special significance as an heirloom or memento; or
(d) the Director or Curator of a bona fide museum; or
(e) an approved employee or approved member of any body, being—
(i) a broadcaster within the meaning of the Broadcasting Act 1989; or
(ii) a bona fide theatre company or society or cinematic or television film production company or video recording production company; or
(f) a licensed dealer or an agent or employee of a licensed dealer; or
(g) a person of a class specified for the purposes of this section by regulations made under this Act.

The time requirement mentioned is attendance 12 times per annum, or once a month at the club. Moreover, you must have special security arrangements at your home and those are regularly inspected by police.

Further, there are controls on where and where you can use said pistol or revolver. You are only able to carry that pistol or revolver in a secured box, to and from your residence and the pistol club, or a licensed dealer or gunsmith. Nowhere else.

On top of that, despite Ghahraman’s claims of “not actually really regulated at all” there are regulations regarding the procurement of pistols and revolvers that, again, are very specific. In fact there is a whole section of the Arms Act detailing the regulations regarding purchase of those types of firearms. Section 35 states:

35. Issue of permit to procure pistol, military style semi-automatic firearm, or restricted weapon
(1) A permit to procure a pistol, military style semi-automatic firearm, or restricted weapon may be issued only by a member of the Police acting under a direction of the Commissioner.
(2) A permit to procure a pistol, military style semi-automatic firearm, or restricted weapon may be issued if the member of the Police to whom the application is made is satisfied
(a) that the person to whom it is issued is a licensed dealer; or
(b) that the person to whom it is issued is the holder of a firearms licence that bears an endorsement made under section 30 or section 30B and that, by virtue of that licence and its endorsement, that person is permitted to have possession of the pistol, military style semi-automatic firearm, or restricted weapon, as the case may be.
(3) Every permit issued under this section shall, unless sooner revoked, remain in force for such period, not exceeding 1 month, as may be specified in the permit.
(4) Any permit issued under this section may at any time during its currency be revoked by a commissioned officer of Police.
(5) No permit is to be issued under this section in respect of an anti-personnel mine or a cluster munition. End of quote.

So, you need a special endorsement, which entails extra security checks, you must be a fit and proper person, and have special security arrangements. Once that is done you need a permit to procure a pistol, approved by police. That permit to procure is for each and every pistol you might want to own.

There are even controls on leaving the country with such a weapon, for instance, in order to compete at a shooting competition. And controls on how to report the destruction or loss of those restricted weapons.

Your right to silence is also controlled if you have a B (Pistol) endorsement. I doubt Golriz Ghahraman would ever agree to that right being impinged… but it is controlled if you own a pistol.

Then there is a whole section on offences specifically regarding pistols or revolvers. It even places the burden of proof on the defendant, not on the prosecution, to prove you were allowed to have possession of a pistol. Again, another control that impinges on rights enjoyed by normal citizens. Section 50 states:

50. Unlawful possession of pistol, military style semi-automatic firearm, or restricted weapon
(1) Every person commits an offence and is liable on conviction to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 3 years or to a fine not exceeding $4,000 or to both who—
(a) is in possession of a pistol and is not a person authorised or permitted, expressly or by implication, by or pursuant to this Act, to be in possession of that pistol; or
(b) is in possession of a restricted weapon and is not a person authorised or permitted, expressly or by implication, by or pursuant to this Act, to be in possession of that restricted weapon; or
(c) is in possession of a military style semi-automatic firearm and is not a person authorised or permitted, expressly or by implication, by or pursuant to this Act, to be in possession of that military style semi-automatic firearm.
(2) It is not an offence against this section to be in possession of a pistol that is an antique firearm.
(3) In any prosecution for an offence against subsection (1) in which it is proved that the defendant was in possession of a pistol, military style semi-automatic firearm, or restricted weapon, the burden of proving that the defendant was authorised or permitted, expressly or by implication, by or pursuant to this Act to be in possession of that pistol, military style semi-automatic firearm, or restricted weapon shall lie on the defendant.
(4) It is a good defence to a prosecution for an offence against subsection (1)(a) if the defendant proves
(a) that he is the holder of a firearms licence; and
(b) that he has owned the firearm to which the charge relates since before 16 May 1969; and
(c) that, immediately before 16 May 1969, he was registered under section 9 of the Arms Act 1958 as the owner of that firearm; and
(d) that, although that firearm is less than 762 millimetres in length, it has not been reduced below that length since 15 May 1969 and is not designed or adapted to be held and fired with 1 hand.
(5) It is a good defence to a prosecution for an offence against subsection (1)(a) if the defendant proves
(a) that the pistol was in his possession for use both
(i) on the range of an incorporated pistol club for the time being recognised by the Commissioner for the purposes of section 29; and
(ii) under the immediate supervision of the holder of a firearms licence bearing an endorsement permitting that person to have possession of that pistol or a pistol of that kind; and
(b) that at all times while the defendant was in possession of the pistol he was both on such a range and under the immediate supervision of such a person. End of quote.

Section 51 is a specific provision for the penalties for illegal carriage of a pistol or revolver. Again, the burden of proof rests with the defendant. Section 51 states:

51. Unlawful carriage or possession in public place of firearm, airgun, pistol, ammunition, explosive, or restricted weapon
(1) Every person commits an offence and is liable on conviction to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 3 years or a fine not exceeding $4,000 or to both who, except for some lawful purpose,—
(a) carries in a public place; or
(b) has in his possession in any public place— any firearm, airgun, pistol, ammunition, explosive, or restricted weapon.
(2) In any prosecution for an offence against subsection (1), in which it is proved that the defendant was carrying in any public place or had in his possession in any public place any firearm, airgun, pistol, ammunition, explosive, or restricted weapon, the burden of proving the existence of some lawful purpose shall lie on the defendant. End of quote.

On top of that, there are regulations that say if a pistol or revolver is found on your premises, in your boat or your vehicle then you are deemed to be the owner, irrespective of whether it is yours or not. And then the burden of proof falls on you as well. Section 66 states:

66. Occupier of premises or driver of vehicle deemed to be in possession of firearm, airgun, pistol, imitation firearm, restricted weapon, or explosive found therein
For the purposes of this Act every person in occupation of any land or building or the driver of any vehicle on which any firearm, airgun, pistol, imitation firearm, restricted weapon, or explosive is found shall, though not to the exclusion of the liability of any other person, be deemed to be in possession of that firearm, airgun, pistol, imitation firearm, restricted weapon, or explosive, unless he proves that it was not his property and that it was in the possession of some other person. End of quote.

Just so we are clear, here is how you get a pistol in NZ:

1. Join a pistol club.
2. Serve a six-month probation.
3. Get recommended as genuine by the club.
4. Apply for a ‘B’ category endorsement to a firearms licence.
5. Pass a background check. No criminals, no criminal associations, no mental illness is allowed. Pass an interview.
6. Police vet your security. This is of a highly mandated standard.
7. Police interview four referees to your character.
8. Police interview any partner to ensure no history of domestic concerns.
9. You get a licence.
10. You apply for a permit to procure a gun.
11. You take this to the seller and collect the pistol.
12. You take this back to the police for registration.
13. The pistol can only go from your home to a police-approved pistol club.
14. You are subject to random checks.
15. If your membership to the club lapses you lose your gun.
16. If you shoot less than 12 times a year, at club events, you lose your gun.
17. You are subject to renewal and revetting at regular intervals.
18. Anyone found in possession of an unregistered pistol will go to prison.

Does that sound unregulated?

So, Golriz Ghahraman just plain outright lied about the lack of gun controls for handguns in New Zealand. It makes you wonder whether her claims of having Interpol involved, because some trolls said some hurty things to her on Twitter, is even true. Especially when you realise that Interpol don’t even handle cases like that. Wikipedia says:

To keep INTERPOL as politically neutral as possible, its charter forbids it, at least in theory, from undertaking interventions or activities of a political, military, religious, or racial nature or involving itself in disputes over such matters. Its work focuses primarily on public safety and battling transnational crimes against humanity, child pornography, computer crime, cybercrime, drug trafficking, environmental crime, genocide, human trafficking, illicit drug production[7], copyright infringement, illicit traffic in works of art, intellectual property crime, money laundering, organized crime, corruption, terrorism, war crimes, weapons smuggling, and white-collar crime. End of quote.

The fact that she giggled her way through the interview and her claims of Interpol involvement just leads me to believe she is lying about that too. Perhaps she might like to provide some paperwork on that.

For someone who was a barrister she sure tells a lot of mistruths. She embellished her CV, claiming she prosecuted war criminals when she was, in fact, defending them. She’s made demonstrably false claims regarding handgun controls in New Zealand and her claims about the involvement of Interpol are shaky, to say the least.

How many more mistruths will this woman tell? How many more will the media let her?


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

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