Jacinda Ardern seems to have trouble with truthiness

Jacinda Ardern seems to have trouble with truthiness. Now I’m not being judgy, but this statement to media yesterday after her Justice Minister had to walk back his previous ‘three strikes’ announcements seems a bit incongruent with previous statements: Quote:

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern told reporters it was a “given” that ministers did not make announcements before discussing them at Cabinet.

“There’s always a given that we wouldn’t do that. It’s something that doesn’t really need requirement to be repeating. It’s an absolute given,” she said.

“Three strikes makes up only a very small part of a much wider agenda and we are continuing to pursue that agenda as a Government. None of these decisions are finalised until we have that discussion as Cabinet. All our ministers know that,” Ardern said.

“It’s always much tidier to wait until Cabinet but the minister has actually made the decision that he wants all of this work to be pursued as a whole anyway.” End quote.

That is pretty emphatic. It rather poses the question, if this is a “given”, an “absolute given”, doesn’t need repeating and all ministers know that, then how did this happen? Quote:

Cabinet has made no decision on ending oil exploration, documents being released today will show, with April’s announcement made on the basis of a political agreement between the coalition parties.

On April 12, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern led a group of ministerial colleagues into the Beehive theatrette to confirm news that the Government had decided it would offer no new offshore permits for oil and gas exploration, with onshore permits offered in Taranaki for as little as three years.

Although the news was delivered by ministers affected by the decision and in a forum usually used to discuss decisions made by Cabinet, politicians made the decision in their roles as party leaders.

Today the Government will release a series of documents generated in the making of the oil and gas exploration decision, but it has already confirmed to Stuff that no Cabinet paper was created and that Cabinet has not voted on the matter.

“There was no Cabinet decision,” a spokesman for Energy Minister Megan Woods said.

In a statement, Ardern defended the handling of the decision, but said it was not how most decisions would be made.

“The decision on future oil and gas block offers was a political decision made by the government parties. It was consulted on and agreed between the parties and taken to Cabinet for confirmation,” a spokesman for Ardern said.

“This is a normal decision making process when it comes to coalition wide matters, but does tend to be the exception rather than the rule.” End quote.

That second series of statements is completely at odds with the more recent statements. The woman can’t maintain both positions, though she won’t care; it will have to be Winston Peters answering questions about those two positions come question time. If, that is, National has the wit to work out that Jacinda Ardern doesn’t know whether she is Arthur or Martha right now.

Jacinda Ardern stated pre-election that she doesn’t tell lies. I call bullshit on that. That claim was a lie in the first instance and now they just flow out of her mouth.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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