On this day a year ago the Craig v Slater case ended, and we still have no judgment

One year ago today we finished up at the high Court after a four week judge alone trial in the Craig vs Slater defamation case.

We still have no judgment, after a year.

I did some research and what I found doesn’t give me much solace. The Courts website has a whole page devoted to timeframes for judgements: Quote:

Reserved judgments

All judges aim to deliver decisions as promptly as possible. The judges of the High Court expect that 90% of decisions will be delivered within three (3) months of the last day of hearing or receipt of the last submission. This period does not include court vacations. On occasion a judge may advise the parties at the hearing that the judgment will take longer than three months to deliver due to the complexity of the case or other pressing matters of court business.

Recent performance:  High Court judgment delivery statistics for the 12 months ending 31 December 2017[1] 

The table below shows the percentage of judgment timeliness statistics delivered in the High Court for the 12 months ending 31 December 2017

Total judgments delivered

Jurisdiction

    <= 1 Months

    <= 3 Months

Civil

     74.1%

      88.9%

             1859

Criminal

     94.9%

     99.4%

             1431

Total

            3290

[…]

Delayed judgments report

The Chief High Court Judge will periodically publish information about the number of judgments considered to be outstanding beyond a reasonable time for delivery in accordance with section 170(1)(b) of the Senior Courts Act 2016.

The Chief High Court Judge has determined that any judgment which is not delivered within six (6) months of the last day of hearing or receipt of the last submission is outstanding beyond a reasonable time unless extenuating circumstances, making a delay beyond six months not unreasonable, apply.  Court vacations are excluded from the six month period.

Report as at 31 March 2018 (6 month period)

As at 31 March 2018 the number of judgments outstanding beyond a reasonable time was:  8  

During the period from 1 October 2017 to 31 March 2018, a further 9 judgments became outstanding beyond a reasonable time.  All of those 9 judgments were delivered by 31 March 2018.

During the same period from 1 October 2017 to 31 March 2018, the Court delivered 1509 judgments in total. End quote.

Small solace. My case is now one of eight outstanding beyond a reasonable time. It is rather ironic as when I applied for a jury trial it was refused on the basis that it would take longer for the court to deal with the case. At least with a jury trial you get a result at the end. There is no apparent end in sight for the litigants with judge alone trials.

I am awaiting another judgment from a hearing held in February 2015…well past three years for that one.

Whilst the judges seem to sleep easy, the people whose lives are on hold waiting for judgment just keep on suffering. What is even worse is I just know that whatever the outcome Colin Craig will appeal until he has exhausted all avenues. While I stand strong there is a toll, both financially and physically. But then that is the plan of these litigants all along. That is why it is called lawfare.

Until one is subject to these sorts of cases you never can know what it is like. People tell me to stand up to them, but there is an awful cost. That is why they attempt to bully people into silence even when you have told the truth. Hopefully this year will break the back of these cases and then people can see that I do indeed tell the truth, and give up trying to silence me from speaking the truth.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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