Spot on Nashy, there is nothing wrong with fundraising, except if you are a hypocrite

Stuart Nash has taken completely the right approach after being approached by media to comment on his recent fundraiser: Quote:

Weeks after Labour was criticised for holding fundraisers featuring ministers, Labour’s Stuart Nash will hold a lunch fundraiser at the swanky Northern Club where about 20 people will pay $1000 each to hear him talk.

Nash, who is minister of Police, Revenue, Fisheries and Small Business, said the fundraiser in Auckland today was to raise money for his Napier campaign in 2020.

Those invited were friends and acquaintances “who have done well in life” and he was speaking as Napier MP rather than in his capacity as a minister. End quote.

Labour were criticised, not for the fundraising, but for their hypocrisy. Quote:

It comes a fortnight after Labour was accused of hypocrisy for a fundraiser at the Wellington Club where attendees paid $600 a head to listen to Finance Minister Grant Robertson speak about the Budget.

Labour defended that, saying Robertson was not there as a minister although the invitation had described him as Finance Minister.

It was accused of hypocrisy because in the past it had accused National of “cash for access” fundraisers at which members and supporters paid to attend events where they could meet National Party ministers and hear them speak. End quote.

But did Stuart Nash ever criticise national for their fundraisers?Quote:

Nash said he had considered changing the venue and the event after the publicity around the Labour fundraiser but decided against it because it was clear he was not speaking in his capacity as minister.

Although he was speaking as Napier MP, it was held in Auckland because that was where the friends who attended lived. “It’s been going long before I was in Cabinet. This is the third year.

It was dubbed the AGM of the Princes St Napier Branch – a riff on Labour’s famous Princes St branch in Auckland.

I talk about what’s happening in Napier. I’m very clear about this, this is for the MP of Napier. It goes into my election funds.

Nash said once the costs of the lunch were taken out he hoped to raise about $15,000.

The donors do not have to be disclosed because candidates only have to disclose donations of more than $1500.

He said he had not criticised National for its fundraisers and believed it was critical for parties and candidates.

I make no bones about the fact that the way I won Napier in 2014 was by raising money and working hard. I firmly believe you can not win or run a campaign without money.

Nash disclosed $27,500 in donations for the last election. End quote.

Spot on Nashy. He didn’t criticise National and nor should he have. It is a legitimate way of fundraising and I suspect many of his fellow caucus members are jealous because Nashy can raise money easily and they can’t.

Labour should continue to be criticised though, they made much of  National’s cabinet clubs, and drew some very low bows in their accusations. That said, those accusations reveal a lot, because those who point fingers and make accusations are more often than not doing exactly the same thing they accuse others of.

Stuart Nash did the right thing here and clearly explained his position, he has nothing to apologise for.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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