If Andrew Little can’t keep Roger Brooking in the tent then what chance does he have?

Roger Brooking is, as we know, a Labour party operative and stooge who maintained attacks on the previous government unceasingly, and especially rather personal attacks against Judith Collins when she was justice minister.

But now he is unhappy with Andrew Little. Quote:

Justice minister Andrew Little has been slammed by National leader Simon Bridges and justice advocate Roger Brooking over the Government’s upcoming Criminal Justice Summit.

The summit is being held in Porirua next week to “shine a light” on what’s happening in courts and prisons, Little has said.

Brooking said while the minister’s moves to fix the criminal justice system – including another advisory expert group and the summit – were well-intentioned, Little  had “lost the plot”.  

“The real crisis in the justice system is in the rapid rise in the prison population. Mr Little said he wants to reduce the prison population by 30 per cent over the next 15 years. Frankly, that’s a ridiculous aspiration without National party collaboration,” Brooking said.

With a three-year cycle Labour could be ousted at the next election and Brooking said National party leader Simon Bridges had already signalled he would “reverse pretty much anything Labour does which he regards as soft on crime”.

Earlier this year when the prison muster was nearing 11,000 Brooking launched a campaign to reduce the number of inmates in Kiwi jails down to 7000 over six years.  End quote.

Roger Brooking is a crim-hugging womble who thinks cuddles and hugs will reform criminals. But if he is off the reservation then Andrew Little has serious problems. As is typical these days of Labour ministers who cop criticism Little went personal: Quote:

Responding to the criticism the minister said although Brooking was full of good ideas he had “to work in the real world of trying to achieve long-term change, not sitting in an armchair wanting long-term change tomorrow,” Little said.

After 30 years of policy favouring more prison sentences and longer periods served in prison driven by populist demands, the first task was to change the public debate, Little said.

“The purpose of the summit is, for the first time ever, to have a public discussion on what’s happening now and what can be done to improve the system. It is about creating an environment in which reform is possible,” Little said.  End quote.

The public doesn’t want a debate, what they want to know is that criminals get put in prison for a long stretch. The public don’t care if prison is squalid, as far as they are concerned it is a case of “out of sight, out of mind.”  Quote:

Bridges  said the summit would be nothing more than a “talkfest” focused on supporting criminals rather than victims.

The agenda read like that of a yoga convention with sessions dubbed “individual reflection” and “hope”, Bridges said.

“It will be a complete waste of time and that’s because the Government knows exactly what it wants to do in criminal justice. It wants to reduce the prison population by a third, but it doesn’t have a plan to reduce crime and nothing on the summit’s agenda suggests this is a focus,” Bridges said.

Instead the Government was going to soften up bail, parole and sentencing laws to make it easier for criminals to get out of prison early and harder for them to get sent there in the first place.

If the summit was genuinely about looking at ways to reduce crime and improve rehabilitation and reintegration, then National would support those efforts, Bridges said. End quote.

Labour are soft on crime. They want a catch and release justice system. Their actions will get people killed.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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