Winston to Bridges: “…reveal to the public who the leaker is, or I will”

Winston Peters says he knows who National’s dirty little leaker is, as do many, but he has upped the ante on this by saying that unless Simon Bridges names the leaker then he will: Quote:

WINSTON PETERS (NZ First): On Suffrage Day, the last thing I would’ve expected was a member of Parliament to get up and attack a woman. They could’ve left it till tomorrow or next week, but no, they reverted to type, because deviation and sideshows and roadblocks are what they’re famous for. They’re famous for that because they’ve got a leader who has an abundance of inquiries, and the most serious inquiry should be about his status as a leader of that party.

Look, the most prominent inquiry in Parliament today concerns the leaking of information by one of his own National Party colleagues. Oh, no, don’t shake one’s head. We all know that the moment we heard this story, there were 55 subjects who were all suspects. Now, the inquiry that Mr Bridges launched—now, he’s the leader of National Party pro tem—was on 28 August, to be conducted by, guess who? PricewaterhouseCoopers. They’re pretty big, but it doesn’t stop there, oh, no; and Simpson Grierson. That was 22 days ago. Now, they’re trying to find somebody who we know—that is, the identity of the leaker in the National Party, and guess who’s paying for the inquiry? Why, the New Zealand taxpayer, through the Leader of the Opposition’s leadership office funding. The New Zealand taxpayer’s paying for this absolutely mindless, hopeless inquiry, the end pathway and result of which we already know. So why don’t we just cut to the chase here? Pay the money to over to us, and we’ll give you the answer. Ha, ha! It is phenomenal.

You know what? Twenty-two days later, we still are no wiser. With these major New Zealand companies in full pursuit, and yet we formed the coalition Government in half that time—11 days—after we knew what the special votes meant. Eleven days to form a coalition; 22 days to try and find out what other people know: namely, who leaked on Mr Bridges. Now, there are members over there that should be very nervous. I won’t look at them, because if I do, or look where they should be, then the suspicion will be cast on them without us getting the reward of disclosure. We are famous for disclosure, especially when it comes to the National Party’s sins.

Can I just say, the National Party has been utterly preoccupied, using taxpayers’ money, and it’s a disguise, because the National Party has an awfully sorry parliamentary record over the last decade. Do you know how many people they’ve seen come and go in the last decade, since 2008? Two pages full.

Clayton Mitchell: Woah, and small font, too!

WINSTON PETERS: Small font—two pages full. Unbelievable. People who either resigned, had to go—and that’s far more than two fingers on two hands—then you’ve got the people who got pushed—

Chris Bishop: What happened to Brendan Horan?

WINSTON PETERS: —and then the ones like Mr Bishop over here mentions, who decided to jump before they got pushed. Forty-five MPs, in the space of three times—all gone. My message to the National Party backbench is: your party is a very dangerous place to be. There’s no doubt about it. It is simply unbelievable.

Let me tell you what, in the last 11 months this coalition Government has made 100—no, 1000—gee, I almost underrated the party’s performance. I underrated the coalition’s performance. We made 1,057 decisions in just 11 months. It took them 11 months to get their boxes down here. That’s all they’ve done—11 long, tawdry, hopeless months to get their boxes down here whilst we are making decisions, possibly 1,200 before the year’s up—1,200.

Can I just say, as we come to close, that the National Party in Opposition is “dysfunction junction”. Nothing’s happening there. It’s a total mess. The leader can’t even get one out of four National Party supporters. Whilst we’re interested in good public policy, all they care about is public relations. We strive for action; all they strive for is unction. The member needs to reveal to the public—that’s Mr Bridges—who the leaker is, or I will. End quote.

I believe that Winston Peters does know who the leaker is. It is pretty much an open secret now among National people. I understand that the leaker has admitted as such to some Young Nationals in Auckland. I also know now who it is, and that is from many sources, all saying the same name. The clock is ticking.

Observant and well informed journalists will also know as the leaker is now being shunned by caucus.

Jacinda Ardern, by sacking Meka the Muss has raised the bar on Simon Bridges. He can no longer be soft on this leaker. He has to rinse them and totally. Meka Whaitiri is still in parliament. If Bridges wants to appear stronger than Ardern then he is going to have to take a head, place it on a pike and let that be a warning for others.


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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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