BBC insider takes the red pill

We live in a time of universal deceit. As in the old Communist societies, the very institutions that citizens should be able to trust implicitly – the state, the police and the public media, lie incessantly.

Police and politicians lie about the mass-rape of children in Britain, media lie about the criminal anarchy imported along with mass immigration from the developing world, academics lie about the fundamental facts of human biology. Anyone who protests this systemic lying is attacked and smeared with vile and often meaningless pejoratives – “racist”, “Islamophobic”, “transphobic” – and often as not arrested for the meaningless “non-crime” of “hate-speech”.

In the movie, The Matrix, characters are given the option of continuing to assent to lies, however comforting, or “take the red pill”, and live the truth, grim and difficult as that may be. The same trope was used almost a decade earlier in the mind-bending 1990 film, Total Recall. This gave rise to the cultural meme of “red-pilling”.

Every so often, even someone at the heart of the machinery of universal deceit takes the red pill. Quote:

The BBC ignored how migration was affecting millions of its viewers, Robert Peston has admitted.

ITV’s political editor, who spent nine years at the corporation, accused the BBC of not being impartial and said it had ‘neglected the effect’ the EU was having on British families. End of quote.

The BBC, like its Australian counterpart the ABC, has a statutory obligation to be strictly impartial. Like its Australian counterpart, it rarely bothers any more. Quote:

‘I love the BBC but I did feel that during the Brexit campaign they slightly got confused about what impartial journalism meant,’ said Peston, who left the BBC in 2015. End of quote.

The biggest problem for organisations like the BBC and ABC is not so much that they are deliberately lying, but that they simply do not even realise that they’re biased and untruthful. Both broadcasters have progressively become closed-circles of a particular humanities-educated, middle-class clique. Groupthink predominates. When a small circle of people who are exactly alike, who all live and work in the same tiny inner-city bubble, are all constantly babbling the same nonsense at one another, their groupthink becomes mistaken for fact. Quote:

‘For too long, people like me had a particular view of the benefits of globalisation and we simply neglected the effect it was having on millions of our citizens.’

He said that journalists including himself had ‘patronised’ viewers by failing to listen to their worries about migration. End of quote.

People like these journalists are among the most privileged human beings on the face of the planet. They witter about the wonders of mass immigration because they never experience its effects. These people do not live in the world they have built for their subjects, as Mark Steyn writes. They live all the benefits of “great restaurants and cheap nannies”, while never having to cram into crushed trains for the hour-long commute from the outer suburbs, or wait weeks for a simple GP appointment. Quote:

‘When we have all that migration from eastern Europe, people like me focused too much on the economic benefits in terms of the rates we were growing, and not enough on the experience of communities who were changing rapidly as a result’, he told the Cheltenham Literature Festival.

‘In a way, we were slightly patronising. People like me were basically saying “don’t you know this is making the country richer?”

‘In fact, it was also dislocating hundreds of thousands to millions of lives, and those people’s lives had been radically changed by immigration. End of quote.

Western countries are being demographically transformed, faster, than any other society in human history. In less than a generation, “Muhammad” has become the most popular baby name in Britain. Tiny German hamlets are being foisted with hundreds of illegal immigrants, all living on welfare. White Americans become isolated in their own workplaces, where nearly everyone speaks Spanish.

Imagine if nearly four million Americans, most of them illegal immigrants, flooded into New Delhi in just a decade. Imagine if Blake suddenly became the most popular baby name in Beijing. Inconceivable? Yet these are exactly the sort of demographic landslides ordinary Westerners are supposed to endure without complaint – or risk being branded “deplorable” by the smug elites living at the top of the globalist heap. Quote:

‘It is not, in my view, racist to be concerned if the composition of your community changes by something like 10 or 15 per cent over a very small number of years.’ End of quote.


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Who is Lushington D. Brady?

Well, a pseudonym. Obviously.

But the name Lushington Dalrymple Brady has been chosen carefully. Not only for the sum of its overall mien of seedy gentility, reminiscent perhaps of a slightly disreputable gentlemen of letters, but also for its parts, each of which borrows from the name of a Vandemonian of more-or-less fame (or notoriety) who represents some admirable quality which will hopefully animate the persona of Lushington D. Brady.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

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