If you can’t stand the heat, get back in the kitchen

Way back in the 90s, writers like Katie Roiphe and Helen Garner were warning that the then-nascent Third Wave feminists were promoting a dangerous and demeaning ideology.

Vinegar-faced feminists with their burgeoning orthodoxy of “intersectionality”, were, Roiphe wrote, reviving a vision of women akin to the fainting flowers of Victorian morality. Instead of seeing women as independent, and the equals of men, feminists painted an oppressive picture of helpless weaklings at the eternal victims of male brutishness.

Today, feminists and their slithering male “allies” peddle the same belittling and dichotomous ideology. On the one hand, women are supposedly strong and capable. Yet, at the same time, women in prominent positions are apparently so fragile that the merest adversity is “bullying”. The instant that they are subjected to anything like the criticism and scrutiny that high-profile men put up with, these precious snowflakes melt into puddles of intersectional tears, while the white knights of “male feminism” shake their skinny soy-weakened arms in righteous fury. Quote:

Who knows what really happened behind the scenes over negotiations to beam the logo of Australia’s richest horse race, the Everest Cup, on the sails of the Opera House. But it doesn’t really matter.

What should matter is the way broadcaster Alan Jones treated Louise Herron, the CEO of the Opera House, in their on-air interview.

Anyone who hasn’t listened to the full audio should do so and make their own judgment. End of quote.

I have, and I have — and I don’t see what the pearl-clutching “outrage” is all about.

I don’t like Alan Jones’ radio show, but his interview with Herron sounded to me exactly like Jones doing what Jones does. I might not like Jones’ style, but if he is a “bully”, he is an equal-opportunity bully. Jones had a long-running feud with former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull, among others. Even if I don’t like Jones, I have to concede that at least he gives public figures a well-deserved flaming that the supine media so rarely does.

But while Jones’ blowtorch is fine when it’s turned on men, women are apparently just too fragile to stand up in the bare-knuckle arena of talk radio. Herron, after all, chose to ring into Jones’ show. Quote:

Scott Morrison backing the advertising is fine in and of itself. This PM of substance pointed out after all that his background is marketing. He understands such things. Less fine is our PM’s unwillingness to call out Jones’ behaviour or even have the guts to weigh in. End of quote.

Louise Herron is the CEO of one of the most prominent cultural institutions in Australia, responsible for managing the public building that is as indelibly associated with Australia as the Eiffel Tower is with France. The idea that someone with so much power and privilege needs to be defended by a creepy clique of rescuing heroes is frankly insulting. Quote:

It’s not like this is a first time offence by Jones when it comes to verbal bullying, especially of women.

Remember his comments about Julia Gillard needing to be thrown out to sea in a chaff bag? End of quote.

“Especially of women”? This is delusional. Jones shouts, hectors and insults public figures as a matter of course, regardless of their sex.

Male politicians cop harder insults than that as a matter of course. The same feminists screeching and waving their flappy arms when Julia Gillard was called a “witch”, giggled into their “Fuck Tony Abbott” t-shirts, when Abbott was called a “pedo”. John Howard was called an “arse-licker”, to a haw-haw-haw chorus from the same male journalists blustering about “misogyny” and “bullying”.

Women, it seems, are just too delicate, too fragile, for the rough and tumble of public life. Quote:

But the main issue here isn’t who is right and who is wrong regarding the Opera House. It’s not even Jones’ conduct (as much as that is an issue) and whether or not he should be allowed to get away with it.

The main issue is the lack of action by the political class to condemn his behaviour. End of quote.

Either women are just as capable as men, or they’re not. If they are, then they are capable of answering to the same level of public scrutiny – which includes Sydney shock-jocks – as men always have. They don’t deserve special privileges or a “woman pass”.

And they certainly don’t need protection from white-knighting journalists.


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Who is Lushington D. Brady?

Well, a pseudonym. Obviously.

But the name Lushington Dalrymple Brady has been chosen carefully. Not only for the sum of its overall mien of seedy gentility, reminiscent perhaps of a slightly disreputable gentlemen of letters, but also for its parts, each of which borrows from the name of a Vandemonian of more-or-less fame (or notoriety) who represents some admirable quality which will hopefully animate the persona of Lushington D. Brady.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

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