Word of the day

The word for today is…

oblige (verb) – 1. To compel or require (someone) to do something, as by circumstance or legality.
2. To make indebted or grateful.
3. To do a service or favour for.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Oblige shares some similarities with its close relative obligate, but there are also differences. Oblige derives via Middle English and the Anglo-French obliger from Latin obligare (“to bind to”), a combination of ob- (“to or toward”) and ligare (“to bind”), whereas obligate descends directly from obligatus, the Latin past participle of obligare.

Both oblige and obligate are frequently used in their past participle forms to express a kind of legal or moral constraint. Obligated once meant “indebted for a service or favour,” but today it typically means “required to do something because the law requires it or because it is the right thing to do.” Obliged is now the preferred term for the sense that Southern author Flannery O’Connor used in a 1952 letter: “I would be much obliged if you would send me six copies.”


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Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

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