Can we come for their streets, now?

Caption: There. Now no-one can possibly be offended.

The left, as has been said, are the one group least likely to learn from their mistakes. An unbroken record of failure hasn’t dimmed their enthusiasm for socialism one whit, even as the population of Venezuela starves. The left cheered on Silicon Valley censorship, squealed like stuck pigs when they started getting censored – then went right back to demanding more censorship.

As I reported recently, another item on the Cultural Revolutionary checklist is erasing the past by erasing its presence in the built landscape. A Labor MP in the notoriously whacky “progressive” hub of Canberra is demanding that streets, suburbs and electoral divisions whose names might conceivably hurt the feelings of some swivel-eyed activist on a permanent outrage-high be renamed.

But erasing people from the historical record for the heinous crime of not measuring up to 21st century social mores could be yet another one of the left’s manias that comes back to bite them. After all, quite a few of the left’s heroes had slightly, ahem, problematic views. Quote:

We begin with the suburb of Watson, named after Australia’s first Labor PM. In 1901 the then Opposition Leader asked the Barton Government to deal firmly with the “coloured alien trouble generally”, saying “Chinese, Hindoos (sic) and such like objectionable races should be dealt with promptly and effectively”. End of quote.

The Labor party and the union movement conveniently forget it now, but the White Australia Policy was theirs. Anti-Chinese prejudice was a Trades Hall dogma, and the Labor party made the restriction of non-white immigration the binding condition of their agreement to support Australia’s first government. Consequently, Australia’s landscape is littered with the names of Labor worthies who were unabashed racists. Quote:

The suburb of Fisher…that Labor PM was unabashedly bigoted. “Legislation will be passed to equalise the bounty and excise, and thereby protect the white growers against unfair competition by those employing coloured labour,” he declared…the suburb of Scullin is also tainted. In 1928, only a year before James Scullin became PM, this Labor leader publicly announced “The first plank of Labor’s Fighting Platform” was to be “the maintenance of a White Australia.”

The residents of Curtin take pride in having a suburb named after the great Labor wartime PM, but…in 1917 he attacked PM Billy Hughes, claiming the latter intended to dismantle the White Australia policy, and replace “Anzacs with Chinese” while the “white sons of Australian mothers are fighting for the Empire on the bloodstained fields of France”. Ditto the suburb of Chifley. He may be remembered as an affable Labor PM, but in 1928 a young Chifley castigated the Bruce Government for admitting “so many dagoes and aliens into Australia”. End of quote.

One of the most notoriously racist remarks by an Australian politician was Arthur Calwell’s “Two Wongs don’t make a white”. But Labor’s racism didn’t end in the 40s. After the fall of Saigon, Labor’s sainted Gough Whitlam ranted that, ““I’m not having these f..king Vietnamese Balts coming into the country”.

Some of Labor’s favourite sons also had “colourful” connections (as they used to say in the Sydney papers). Quote:

We can also look forward to the demolition of a $72,000 taxpayer-funded bronze statue of Whitlam’s Immigration Minister Al Grassby…Grassby worked tirelessly for his Griffith constituents, especially the Calabrian ones. Following the disappearance and murder of anti-drugs campaigner and Liberal state candidate Donald MacKay at the hands of the mafia in 1977, Grassby unsuccessfully tried to persuade a NSW state politician to read out in Parliament a disgusting claim that McKay’s wife and son were complicit in his murder.

A commission of inquiry later found Grassby had acted to protect the real murderers, and that “no decent man” could have disseminated the “scurrilous lies” that Grassby did. End of quote.

Labor MP Bec Cody claims to have “zero tolerance for racism”, so by the standard she is setting, she has no choice but to erase a legion of Labor’s most illustrious names from the map. Anything less would just make her a steaming hypocrite.

Heaven forbid that a leftist should be thought hypocritical.


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Who is Lushington D. Brady?

Well, a pseudonym. Obviously.

But the name Lushington Dalrymple Brady has been chosen carefully. Not only for the sum of its overall mien of seedy gentility, reminiscent perhaps of a slightly disreputable gentlemen of letters, but also for its parts, each of which borrows from the name of a Vandemonian of more-or-less fame (or notoriety) who represents some admirable quality which will hopefully animate the persona of Lushington D. Brady.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

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