Charity boxing: The risk is high

via Sky Sport UK

Over the years we have seen all sorts of innovative ways to raise money and awareness for various different charities.  It’s currently Movember, and men have stopped shaving their upper lip to raise awareness about men’s health issues.  It’s a good cause, and a safe, risk-free way to earn a few bucks.  A little gentle ribbing from colleagues for the less hirsute amongst us.  At the other end of the scale, amateurs are prepared to get into the boxing ring to raise money.

On Saturday evening, Kain Parsons took part in a charity boxing event that was raising money for Conductive Education, a charity that supports the schooling of children with developmental delays and motor disorders.  Kain was injured during his bout and rushed to the hospital.  He has since died as a result of his injuries.

Kain’s death is a tragedy for his wife and three children.  How could a good deed go so badly wrong?

Understandably, questions are now being asked about the safety of charity boxing, and whether other precautions are needed to prevent a similar tragedy occurring.

This from StuffQuote:

“From what I saw he [Parsons] hit his head when he went down on the canvas,” Davidson said.

Parsons was unconscious for several minutes as medics responded to him.

“When you look at Kain and his opponent, they’re pretty evenly matched in terms of height and weight but I think the other guy had a bit more experience.

“I think they need to take a few lessons from last night to try prevent that kind of thing happening again and make sure the guys, they match them up in terms of ability and punching power, not just height and weight.”

Davidson also wanted head gear to be compulsory for competitors: “In hindsight if I did it again, and I don’t intend to, I would wear head gear”.  End of quote.

I’m not afraid to admit, I’m a chicken, and I won’t be getting into a boxing ring ever, headgear or not.

Longtime boxing expert Sir Bob Jones is very much opposed to charity boxing events.  He believes it’s dangerous and people take it too lightly.  You can listen to what he had to say to Mike Hoskings hereQuote:

Sir Bob Jones told Mike Hosking headgear was initially worn in training to protect eyebrows.

“That was translated as somehow giving them head protection or brain protection, it doesn’t; the brain gets jolted in boxing if there’s a punch, it doesn’t matter if there’s headgear in front of it.”

He said he doesn’t like charity boxing matches because they are distasteful.

“You can’t put blokes in there banging away at one another without expecting some repercussions, boxers do die in the ring.”  End of quote.

A concussion is caused by the brain moving around inside the skull.  Headgear does nothing at all to prevent that from happening.

It’s too late for Kain and his family.  They have already lost their husband and father, in an accident that was actually quite needless, even though it was well intended.

I think it would be good to leave boxing to those fully trained and cognisant of all the risks.  There are plenty of other ways to champion a cause that are risk-free.

 


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