More fake news from a ‘Kiwi icon’

Yesterday’s news

It is not surprising that an ex-iconic Auckland newspaper resorted to giving away their printed pages for free because they just couldn’t sell them.  But the free subscription didn’t work either. I’ve lost count of the number of free subscriptions turned down over the last few years following their fall from credibility.

Annoyed subscribers drop off immediately they twig onto the thinly disguised political messages being served up as facts.

Not a problem for informed readers, people who don’t read between the lines or only take an anecdotal interest in politics are prime targets for media brain-washing.

This is clearly demonstrated by the New Zealand public’s usual negative response to the name Donald Trump despite his accomplishments since taking the helm.

The majority of American media, hijacked by the left who largely control academia and Hollywood, direct attack after attack on Trump’s image and reputation using disparaging and inaccurate information. We see it here when our media copy and paste the lies and drivel.

The latest anti-Trump attack is from a newspaper and is titled: ‘America implodes: ‘Invisible meltdown inside Donald Trump’s government’ and is a book review of The Fifth Risk by Michael Lewis. Quote. 

[Lewis] describes an invisible meltdown taking place in the most important parts of the federal government, based on a theme of employing people to run very complex things, when they have no idea how those things work.

Now, everything a government is designed to do — keep the country running, keep people safe and keep justice in order — is being compromised by its own leaders.

And it all started before Trump had even entered the White House.” End of quote.

If the meltdown is invisible, how do they know about it?

They gloss over keeping the country running, keeping people safe and ensuring justice, all formidable challenges successfully dealt with by Trump, to draw attention to an “invisible meltdown”.

To the cursory reader, the title of the article is deliberately misleading because it strongly suggests that Trump’s government is responsible for the current ‘invisible meltdown’ inside his government. We know this is not true because the writer immediately contradicts himself by saying that Trump inherited the administrative problems.

We also know that Trump’s administration was aware of administrative corruption because it prompted Trump’s promise to “drain the swamp”.

The suggestion that Trump did not expect to win the 2016 election is either a complete lie or at best, a half-truth.  Quote. 

When Trump first won the election, it was claimed he hadn’t expected to win, and didn’t even want the job.” End of quote.

It is simply not believable that Trump would invest the time, energy and money, at great personal sacrifice for his family, into a campaign he didn’t expect to win and did not want. Another lie.

After the election, Trump’s acceptance speech refers to the start of his campaign the previous year when talks about the win being far larger than anyone expected.  He never publicly raises the likelihood of not winning. But eighteen months later and hugely positive response from the public to his relentless campaigning changed all that. Only an idiot would not have expected the positive outcome from the polls after witnessing the numbers regularly turning up to his meetings, particularly through the mid-west. Quote. 

Who would have believed that when we started this journey on June 16, last year, we — I say we because we are a team — would have received almost 14 million votes, the most in the history of the Republican party?” End of quote.

Others predicted Trump’s win, Helmut Norpoth political science professor at Stony Brook University in New York predicted Trump’s win nine months out from the election, liberal documentarian Michael Moore predicted his win when the polls did not, and American University history professor Allan Lichtman also predicted a Trump win after successfully predicting every presidential election since 1984.  And still, still, the media expect us to believe that Trump did not anticipate his win!

Trump critics cannot dent his performance to date because he is fulfilling his election promises.  Grasping at straws, a book is written on the mysterious and ever so threatening, invisible “fifth risk”. Quote. 

John MacWilliams, who served as the Energy Department’s first-ever chief risk officer, identified five major worries for America’s future: a nuclear weapons-related accident; a potential conflict with North Korea; stoked tensions with Iran; an attack on the US electrical grid; and finally, the fifth and most subtle risk — project management.

The “Fifth Risk” seems the least threatening, Lewis explains, but can actually be the worst.” End of quote.

Well, of course, it has to be the worst risk since Trump cleanly despatched the other four major concerns raised.  This “invisible and subtle” risk of Trump’s lack of “project management” is simply grasping at straws. Quote. 

“Some of the things any incoming president should worry about are fast-moving: pandemics, hurricanes, terrorist attacks,” Lewis explains. “But most are not. Most are like bombs with very long fuses that, in the distant future, when the fuse reaches the bomb, might or might not explode.” end quote.

Might or might not eh?  Good luck media try-hards, do your worst in putting the wind up the punters with your credibility well down the drain.

Just know that no one is particularly worried about anything you say because Trump will swat you flat like the annoying pesky insects that you are.


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The subject evoked in the collage is the debating of political issues with friends in a public place

Pablo Picasso
Glass and bottle of Suze (after 18 November 1912)
pasted paper, gouache and charcoal

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