I’m dreaming of a brown Christmas

Credit: Braden Fastier/Stuff

More PC Christmas nonsense in Nelson, this time featuring a Maori Santa in the Christmas parade.

The Nelson Santa Parade took a bi-cultural approach to the white-bearded, jolly man this year with a Māori man representing Santa Claus.

The sleigh led by Santa’s reindeer was ridden down Trafalgar St with the merry elves, but Santa’s traditional suit was ditched for a red korowai (Māori cloak) on Māori man, Robert Herewini.

Community Arts Works Trust were the the art and costume designers for the parade and secretary Mark Soper said the idea behind the Māori Santa was “bi-culturalism leading multi-culturalism”.

“That’s the modern day reality, we have a multicultural society. One third of Nelsonians are born outside of Nelson.”

He said the idea of Santa as an old man with a white beard wasn’t necessarily correct. 

“Who’s to say .. that is accurate anyway.  End of quote.

Well, Wikipedia for one, plus a couple hundred years of history.  Quote:

Santa Claus is generally depicted as a portly, jolly, white-bearded man—sometimes with spectacles—wearing a red coat with white fur collar and cuffs, white-fur-cuffed red trousers, a red hat with white fur and black leather belt and boots and who carries a bag full of gifts for children.

This image became popular in the United States and Canada in the 19th century due to the significant influence of the 1823 poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas” and of caricaturist and political cartoonist Thomas Nast. This image has been maintained and reinforced through song, radio, television, children’s books, films, and advertising.  End of quote.

Photoshopped image credit: Technomage

This may come as a surprise, but not everyone was smitten with the butchering of tradition.  Quote:

The crowd had mixed reviews about the bicultural Santa.  End of quote.

I bet they did!  Quote:

Carlo Weigand said he thought it was “fantastic”.

“What a surprise! So Kiwi.”   End of quote.

Foreigner. Adult.  Quote:

Some people could be overheard supporting the Māori Santa, while other children showed their disapproval by the look on their face or their questions of where the “real” Santa was.  End of quote.

It seems the adults are getting completely carried away, and forgetting that Christmas really is for kids.

Why can’t we just let kids be kids and enjoy the traditions loved by generations?

What’s next, do we re-write the lyrics for I’m dreaming of a White Christmas?

I just have one question left.  How ridiculous does this look?

Credit: Braden Fastier/ Stuff


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