Whaleoil transcript: Part one, Mike Hosking, Stuart Nash & Mark Mitchell on Sroubek

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Listen to the full interview here

Part One:

Mike

Mark, you’ve been sort of running with this thing, the Sroubek case, you’ve got this letter from his ex-wife and she’s given permission to speak on her behalf and we’ve got more insight here and so she’s a troubled woman and in real danger and in a safe house and immi… how the hell does immigration find out where she is?

Mark

Well that’s the question I asked the minister yesterday and he doesn’t know so we’ll go back to the house today and we’ll try and find out a bit more information. I have to advise Nashie because it was him that I called and asked umm… whether the police could respond in putting a safety plan around her and making sure that she was safe. The police did an outstanding job in doing that, however she was in a house that only the police should have been aware of where she was, and somehow immigration have found out and have turned up at the house so… completely unannounced, so we need to find out what’s gone wrong there.

Mike

How does that work Stuart?

Stuart

I have absolutely no idea.  I’m with Mark.  You know there are some people who… who just need to be kept safe and there’s no way anyone apart from police should know where that is so I’m… I’m a little bit in the dark as well.

Mike

Having said that, so what we find is a woman who is in fear of her safety now, with a man we’ve given residency, Stuart, and that makes the decision look even more stupid.

Stuart

No, we’ve pulled back on that and… and as the minister of has said he’s got all the information, and from that information, he’s made the right decision. But you know, he did… he did make a decision aah… based on the information he had at the time. He’s changed that, and all credit to Mitch. He… he… Mitch dug out some information and provided it to the minister which has helped aah… make a fully informed very important decision and now this guy is heading home.

Mike

See, what we’ve got… well he… well maybe he’s heading home, let’s go through the court process first of all.  Mark, as far as I’m concerned, we had old Lees-Galloway on the programme last week and I think for the first time we got to the bottom of what was really going on.

This is a… this is a… this is a bleeding-heart liberal who feels bad about sending a criminal back to what he perceived to be some sort of danger in the Czech Republic. That’s what it boils down to and he was prepared to put the safety of Sroubek ahead of the safety of most New Zealanders.

Mark

Well look, we don’t… we are trying to dig into this. I had a meeting with Michael Woodhouse in Ian Lees-Galloway’s office yesterday morning, and with his officials and it was very, very clear by the body language and the reaction of those officials from immigration that they felt that all the original information pack that he had clearly showed that the minister should have made the decision to deport and he didn’t, and I think everyone was shocked by that. Now we want to know why he didn’t make that decision because… and actually as a bit part of that there’s representations that we have made on behalf of Sroubek that have been hidden from us umm… and I asked the minister and said “Will you make those public so that we can see who was actually making representations on his behalf?” and now we have to wait and see whether he’s going to do that. There’s a lot more gone on, this has got a long way to run.

Mike

That’s true. What do you reckon…

Stuart

I hope it’s not too much longer.

Mike

Well, it will because if it’s a court process… what if you guys, Stuart, if you lose?

Stuart

Well… sorry mate?

Mike

What if you lose in court? What if he stays?

Stuart

Aah… well that would be most unusual wouldn’t it? That means the court would… would overrule the minister’s decision and aah… well let’s wait and see what happens there but you know… I heard Sroubek on the radio saying “Well, give me one more chance.” Well, give me a break mate, you imported bloody drugs into our country, aah you intimidated people, you’ve been involved with gangs and you has a lot of chances, we… you know we gave you a chance. We are a benevolent country, we did a… anyway my view on this has always been the same.  You know, let him go home and let him go to some other country… I dunno.

Mike

Exactly! So why…

Stuart

I don’t want these sort of people in New Zealand to be honest, Mike, I really don’t.

Mike

Couldn’t agree more, so you’re the sensible voice of the Labour party which is why you’re on this programme, why aren’t there more of you and fewer of Lees-Galloway?

Stuart

Oh no, you’d be surprised.  There’s a whole… including Ian, there are a lot of very sensible people in this government who are making some amazingly good decisions that are changing lives. You know, every now and again we get it wrong and the minister has admitted that if he had all the information in front of him, he probably wouldn’t have made that original decision but he didn’t. He’s got all the information. This guy’s now going home, good riddance, never come back.

Mike

Do you think….

Mark

I agree with you. I’m telling you now if Nashie had been the minister he would have been gone by lunchtime. But he’s not and Galloway has made a very poor decision, we don’t know why, we’re going to find out, he had the information in front of him right at the beginning and umm… and so we… (unintelligible)

Mike

Because that’s… this is where it gets interesting Stuart, because part of it, depending on what part of the Immigration Act you are citing, it’s 155 or 156, or whatever the case may be, if the information that he’s allegedly using and saying is new was actually in there in the first place he stands a very real chance of losing the court case because you can’t cite something you already saw, just because you didn’t see it, and use that as an excuse. The judge won’t have it.

Stuart

Yes, but my understanding Mark, is that umm… the thing that turned it for the minister was the fact that this guy has actually been home.  I mean, if he’s in great danger you’d think, you know, you’d do whatever it took to ensure that you never went back so this guy’s gone home. And I think Mitch was the one that uncovered this, but he went home and that… in… in my view that completely chances the nature of the whole case. If you’re in that much danger mate, why the hell did you go? We’d have given you a ticket… well I don’t know if we are going to pay for this ticket…

Mike

Of course, you will pay for his ticket, you are probably paying for his lawyer as well.

Stuart

Aah well… well, this is the thing, you know it costs us 110,000 bucks to keep this bloke in jail.  Why don’t we just be done with it?  Let’s give him an early Christmas present and just send him home. But we can’t say that.  But you know what I mean. The thing is, the vast majority of kiwis, including the minister, once we had all the information in front of us, we are now going aah okay, this isn’t what it appeared in the first instance. And I think even the minister has said “Well, if I’d known this guy had gone home then what sort of danger is he really in?” And so, I think what we need to do is take the politics out of this, look at the reality of the situation, the minister as far as I’m aware didn’t have all that information, he now has, and he’s made the right decision.

Mark

That’s very, very debatable.


**Part two of this interview will be published at 8.45am.

They discuss National polling, a change of leader and  whether Maggie Barry bullies

 


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