If you want to get things done, ask Bernie Monk

via Stuff

Who else has kept this issue alive through the years as well as caused a PM, party leaders and other significant [incomplete]

Pike River families believe they could know as soon as July whether a manned re-entry will be allowed into the drift.

Experts working with the families of some of the 29 men killed in the 2010 west coast mine disaster have put together a timeline for the government, setting out a 10-step process for re-entry.

Bernie Monk, whose son Michael was killed, says the families aren’t planning on messing around. Read more »

Guest Post: Palestinian terrorism and Muslim hypocrisy: An open letter from a Muslim woman

While millions of children got out of bed on the morning of June 30, 2016, excited for summer vacation, one child did not. A young Israeli girl, 13-year-old Hallel Yaffe Ariel, was brutally murdered in her own bed by a 17-year-old Palestinian terrorist. He broke into her house and stabbed her to death. Another life lost to senseless violence. Another poor soul taken too early from this world. But few Muslims in this world will be mourning her death, because Hallel was an Israeli Jew.

I am a Muslim, and I know that when it comes to Palestinian terrorism, too many Muslims are hypocrites. I have seen firsthand the casual, destructive anti-Semitism that plagues the Muslim community. I have heard it from the mouths of our religious leaders, from our politicians, and even from our otherwise peaceful, liberal Muslim activists. I have witnessed in horror the desperate attempts to justify Palestinian terrorism from people who I once respected. Why? Why do we decry all other types of terrorism, but bend over backwards to legitimize violence against Israeli Jews?

Read more »

Mental Health Break

UPDATED:Terrorists complain that their operatives were killed by the country they were targeting

What a weird world we live in. I woke this morning to the following headline.

Hamas blames Egypt for deaths of 3 from toxic gas in Gaza tunnel

Imagine the conversation with the journalist:

Question: So what happened Muhammad?

Answer: Well I and other members of Hamas were hard at work repairing our tunnel that the oppressive Egyptian army had damaged yet again.

Question: That is a pretty big tunnel Muhammad, where do you and your men source all the concrete from?

Answer: Well our allies in the UN supply we Palestinians with millions of dollars worth of concrete and other building materials for free to rebuild our cities that have been destroyed.

Question: How do the building materials get to Palestine?

Answer: The Israelis deliver it to us.

Question: Your enemies deliver it to you? Why would they do that?

Answer: Because we tell them that it will be used to build hospitals and schools and roads and houses and parks.

Question: But shouldn’t you be using the concrete to rebuild homes and infrastructure for your people?

Answer: It is more important that we build these tunnels to advance the peace process in order to work towards a one state solution.

Question: A one state solution? Peace? That sounds wonderful, how are you going to achieve that?

Read more »

Map of the Day

If Every State had an Official Meat

Click here for larger view

Hard proof for fat and sugar taxers: education works

Well lookie here.   Turns out that people are getting the message and are making better choices without troughing busybodies or government interference:

Fresh produce has won Kiwi shoppers over in a recent grocery popularity list.

Countdown’s Annual Trolley Report reveals which items make their way into New Zealander’s trolleys most often. It suggests that processed foods are out and fruit and vegetables are in.

Bananas claimed the number one spot in the year to October 2016, pushing 2015’s winner Homebrand $1 white bread down to second place.

Bananas still are one of nature’s pre-packaged superfoods.   Read more »

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Home D for aggravated robbery? Are the prisons really full?

Two 18-year-olds have been sentenced to home detention after one of them bashed Mr Lal in the head with an iron bar.

Mr Lal owns the Kingsland Dairy in Hikurangi, a small village just north of Whangārei.

The shop is immaculate, with sparkling windows, grocery shelves stacked with military precision and an old-style display of sweets behind glass on the counter.

It was here that Eruera Wharerau, 18, whacked him on the head with a tyre iron and demanded cash last July.

Mr Lal ran from the shop and smashed the windscreen of the robbers’ car in a bid to foil their escape.

It did not work. He spent three days in hospital and suffered crippling headaches for months.

“In the head I was really badly hurt, at the back of my head it was all swollen.

So whacking someone in the head with a tyre iron doesn’t even get you a prison sentence anymore.   Read more »

Hey Bill, now that John’s gone, do you mind turning immigration down a tad?

RNZ reports

The number of people coming to New Zealand to live or visit is at a record high.

Official figures show more than 71,300 people settled here in the year to January, beating the previous annual record set a month earlier by 700.

The January month also set a new high of 6460 – the fifth successive month net migration has exceeded 6000.

At some point, enough has to be enough.  We are having capacity problems across the board, from housing to education.   Read more »

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Photo of the Day

Cindy James was known to be a friendly and loving person. She didn’t drink excessively or touch drugs and married a man who was nearly two decades her senior. They shared a workplace where he was a doctor and she was a nurse. It was only a few months after they divorced that her life turned upside down.

Who Killed Cindy James?

A woman is found murdered after reporting more than 100 incidents of harassment and violence, but police think she staged the attacks herself.

This is a tragedy that unfolded over seven years of attacks and harassment by an unknown perpetrator. Her violent death – far from offering closure – was only the beginning of an agonizing journey through layers of family secrets, official negligence, and conflicting stories.

On June 8, 1989, the quiet Vancouver, British Columbia, suburb of Richmond was shocked when a body was found lying in the yard of an abandoned house. The victim was a 44-year old nurse named Cindy James. She had been drugged and strangled. Her hands and feet had been tied behind her back. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police believed that Cindy’s death was either an accident or suicide.

The short of it is, soon after leaving her husband in 1981, James started receiving threatening phone calls. The police started to investigate but over the next several months, the harassment increased. She reported prowlers outside her house at night. Windows were smashed and phone cords cut. According to a friend, James claimed bizarre notes were being left on her doorstep, and that she had been attacked several times.

In the seven years before she died, Cindy reported nearly 100 incidents of harassment.  Five were violent physical attacks. Over time, the police began to doubt her stories. But Cindy’s parents never doubted that their daughter was murdered. Cindy’s father, Otto Hack:

“The police did not investigate the possibility of homicide, of somebody murdering her, but zeroed in on trying to prove that she committed suicide.”

Read more »

Bill English back on his hobby horse about young people being unemployable

In April last year, English made few friends and gave the opposition an easy 48 hours of material for talk back an media commentary when he expressed his frustration on behalf of employers who were having trouble finding decent calibre people.

He’s had another go yesterday

Young Kiwis not passing drug tests is a problem for employers filling jobs in skills shortage areas, Prime Minister Bill English says.

While there are good initiatives across New Zealand to match locals with skills shortage jobs, he says drug issue means migrant workers are still needed.

“One of the hurdles these days is just passing the drug tests,” Mr English said on Monday. Read more »