Virtue signalling by Starbucks backfires

The Blaze reports on the end of Starbucks virtue signalling over refugees.

After President Donald Trump’s signed an executive order on immigration and refugees last month, Starbucks pledged they would hire 10,000 refugees over the next five years.

“We are living in an unprecedented time, one in which we are witness to the conscience of our country, and the promise of the American Dream, being called into question,” Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz said at the time.

But now, their decision has apparently backfired.   Read more »

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Photo of the Day

Eugene Deatrick and Dieter Dengler, NAS Miramar, 1968. His inmates included Air Force Lieutenant Duane Martin, and Eugene DeBruin an Air American crewman who bailed out of a burning cargo plane, and others from the Air American crew. They were far from the first American men to be imprisoned in a camp in Vietnam; Ban Houei Het was one of a dozen camps in North Vietnam alone. USN Photo.

Escape from Laos

On February 2nd of 1966, US Navy Lieutenant Dieter Dengler was flying his first combat mission over North Vietnam from the carrier U.S.S. Ranger. The Ranger and its warplanes, including the Skyraiders of VA-145, had just repositioned from Dixie to Yankee Station following a short workup off the waters of South Vietnam in the South China Sea. Missions from Yankee Station in the Tonkin Gulf would be much more demanding and dangerous than those flown in the relatively benign South Vietnamese environment.

The USS Ranger was a seasoned combat veteran, having been deployedto Vietnam for Flaming Dart I operations. The carrier played a steady role for the remainder of American involvement in the war. The first fighter jets to bomb Haiphong in Operation Rolling Thunder came from her decks.

LT Dieter Dengler was a German-born American citizen who advanced from VT30 to Attack Squadron 122 in late 1964 and then to Attack Squadron 145 onboard the Ranger. Dengler was known to his shipmates as something of a renegade; the ops officer was always after him to get a haircut and Dengler was forever in trouble over his uniform or lack of military manner. In his

German accent, he would protest, “I don’t understand.” But Dengler was a good pilot, although his flying career was brief.

U.S. Navy Lt. Dieter Dengler launched from the aircraft carrier USS Ranger in an A1H Skyraider as part of a four-aircraft interdiction mission near the border of Laos. Dieter was the last man to roll in on a target when he was observed by the pilot of one of the other aircraft to start a normal recover. Due to limited visibility, the flight lost sight of him.

The other aircraft in the flight could not determine what had happened. They only knew Dengler disappeared. Dengler later stated that ground fire had severely damaged his aircraft, and he was forced to crash land in Laos. Search continued all that day and part of the night without success. The following morning, squadron members again went to search the area where Dengler disappeared and located the aircraft wreckage. Helicopters were called in. From the air, it appeared that no one was in the cockpit of the aircraft. The helicopter crew photographed the area and noted his donut (a round seat cushion) on the ground by the wing. They hoped he was still alive in the jungle somewhere.

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National’s motel bill is out of control

via Stuff

The number of families needing Government’s new emergency housing grant has blown out, showing National is out of touch on the scale of the housing crisis, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little.

“Bill English and Paula Bennett clearly have no idea how many Kiwis are being affected by the housing crisis.

“They expected 1,400 homeless families to need grants to pay for a week’s accommodation in a motel. In the first three months, MSD issued nearly 9,000 grants covering 2,600 families. They expected the cost to be $2m a year; it was $8m in three months. Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Paul Foster-Bell to quit

Paul Foster-Bell has announced he is going to step down at the next election.

National list MP Paul Foster-Bell will stand down at the election, after pulling out of the candidate selection race for Wellington Central.

Mr Foster-Bell, a former diplomat, first entered parliament in 2013, replacing Dr Jackie Blue.

“Today I informed local National Party members that I am withdrawing my name from consideration for selection in Wellington Central, and that I will not seek a place on National’s list for the 2017 general election,” he said.   Read more »

If Whaleoil did to Hager what Hager did to Whaleoil

I was just minding my business walking along the beach when a chap calling himself CookedFish handed me a thumb drive. It contained “leaked” information from a hack he had done on the extreme left, controversial, trust fund baby and Marxist writer Sticky Nicky Hager.

I had heard about the hack through political circles and since I was already (conveniently) writing a book on the topic of Marxist writers who are Trust fund babies who are controversial, I had put some feelers out hoping to make contact with the mysterious figure known only as CookedFish.

Trying to hide my excitement I rushed home and slowly made my way through eight years worth of alt-left Hager’s personal and private communications. It was shocking stuff.

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When is a win… a win?

Lethargy won in Mt Albert.

It does show that Mt Albert is ripe for a bit of external campaign pressure.  With that level of lethargy, anyone can take that electorate in September.   But I doubt a party will bother as it will prefer to put energy into true marginals.

More importantly for Jacinda Ardern, it has elevated her profile once more.  Little would be an idiot not to have her front and centre for the general election.

 

– Twitter

Let’s have a jolly good time on the taxpayers’

Guest post

The latest Minister’s credit card expenses for the September to December 2016 are out and, as usually, media have raked through credit card spending trying to discover what Ministers have been over indulging on with taxpayer’s money.

We learned that Todd McClay took Winston Peters to Paris and they dined on foie gras and snails at a bistro in Paris. Hey, while in Paris might as well try a snail or two.

Rarely do they examine the opposition parties expense accounts. Why bother, they don’t get the opportunities to travel or waste taxpayer’s money like the governing parties or do they but it doesn’t come under the microscope? However, we are going to do some digging and examine the expenses of the three opposition parties since the 2014 elections to December 2016.

Labour have 32 MPs – In December 2016 Michael Wood replaced Phil Goff.

Greens have 14 MPs – In September 2015 Marama Davison replaced Russell Norman and Barry Coates replaced Kevin Hague left late in 2016.

NZ First started off with 11 MPs but gained an extra MP when Winston Peters won the Northland by-election early in 2015.    Read more »

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Bill doesn’t know what is going on and Murray isn’t telling the truth

NZ Foreign Minister Murray McCully

The other day Bill English said he was waiting to communicate with Israel over the diplomatic impasse but the Jerusalem Post reports another story:

Israel is waiting for an explanation from New Zealand regarding why it surprised Jerusalem and sponsored UN Security Council Resolution 2334 before there can be any talk of repairing the damaged ties between the two countries, a senior diplomatic official accompanying Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told The Jerusalem Post.

That is quite different from what Bill English has said:

“New Zealand was involved with sponsoring the resolution. I think the Australian Government probably disagrees with that… we want a constructive relationship with Israel and we intend to work on that relationship.”

[…]  Read more »

Does Gareth Morgan really believe in evidence-based policy

Gareth Morgan states that he is unlike other political parties and that their policies are evidence-based.

Once we have a clear idea of the problem, we can look at opportunities to resolve it. What does the theory suggest? What does the evidence suggest? What have we tried in the past, and how did that work? What have they tried overseas, and how well did that work?

Of course there is evidence and there is evidence. Some evidence is high quality, and priority should always be given to that. Establishment governments here and overseas often don’t want to monitor and evaluate policy because they don’t want to know if it hasn’t worked. Sometimes an idea is new or novel, and hasn’t been tried elsewhere. As a result, sometimes there isn’t much evidence around on a particular topic. However, lack of high quality evidence shouldn’t always be a barrier to action. Overall, we have to make a judgement based on the best available evidence at the time, which is where values come into play.

Establishment parties often twist the question of evidence to their political advantage. Look at the issue of obesity, where the Government has announced a ‘22 point plan’ to deal with the problem. They say there is no evidence that junk food taxes work, yet there is more evidence for the use of junk food taxes and restrictions on advertising to children than there is for any of the policies in their ’22 point plan’.

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