Daily Proverb

Proverbs 27

7 A person who is full refuses honey,
but even bitter food tastes sweet to the hungry.

Sunday nightCap

Al Bundy and Marcy D’Arcy predict Trump and Hillary

Tagged:

Trump is personally pleasant and a little boring

Tagged:

Brush up on your civilisation types

Tagged:

Game of Thrones, the bits you don’t know [SPOILERS]

Tagged:

Daily Roundup

Whaleoil Backchat

Backchat logo 1Good evening, welcome to Whaleoil Backchat.

You don’t have to stay “on topic” in these posts like you do in all others. Feel free to share your own stories, discuss other news or catch up with friends. If you haven’t tried it before, signing up for a Disqus account is free, quick, and it is easy.

New commenters should familiarise themselves with our Commenting and Moderation rules. Thank you.

>> Trouble commenting on Whaleoil? Read this first. You can receive free help. Do not email via the Contact Page

Whaleoil Sport Quiz

“My people” and the politics of exclusion – Hide

Dusting off his megaphone, Hone Harawira echoed what has become commonplace for Maori MPs speaking of “Our People” as in, “the rights of Our People are important” and “We must always be guided by [creating a strong, Maori sovereign point of view within Parliament] because that’s what Our People want.”

When referring only to themselves, MPs employ the singular and speak of “My People”.

For example, when in hot water, Harawira declared, “I answer to My People, not to them or to anybody else.”

Bill English would be toast if he deployed the same affectation and spoke of “My People”. The reaction would be short and sharp. We would not tolerate it.

His colleagues would assume he had lost the plot and dump him.

English is prime minister, not some ancient king with royal rights over us.

And nor is Harawira. “His People” don’t belong to him.

Indeed, “His People” voted him out. And when he was an MP, the voters weren’t “His People” but rather he was privileged to be their representative. He was their servant, not the other way around.

Be that as it may, his people weren’t happy he had shacked up with a mischievous rich German who was trying to pretend he’d hang out with your average Maori from up north, because he understood their struggles against the government.  Hone’s mistake was that he laid bare his naked self-interest and it had nothing to do with “His people”.   Read more »