Archives

The new leader of the opposition?

ACT leader David Seymour

By Dieuwe de Boer
Right Minds

About a year ago I drafted an obituary for the ACT Party. I didn’t publish it, but with all the flailing about and bizarre antics Seymour was doing trying to stay relevant while being dead in the polls, I thought it was about time to write them off. The only thing that really stopped me from finishing the piece was Stephen Berry’s tenacity to stay in the fight for freedom of speech.

Granted, not all of David Seymour’s fumbles have been intentional. Some have been due to his being all alone in a hostile environment without many resources at his disposal, but regardless of if they’re your fault or not, a mistake is a mistake. They make you look bad and stop people from taking you seriously.

Then along came a gift and an asset: Golriz Ghahraman of the Green Party, the biggest hate speech crusader—or should that be Saracen—in parliament.

She might be the most vocal of the lot, but Jacinda Ardern and Andrew Little have been right behind her. The relative silence from National’s most prominent members, Simon Bridges and Judith Collins on this have been another boost to Seymour’s credibility on many issues: it’s often 1 against 119.

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Podcast #6 David v Golriz, Alfred v Unholy abortion Holocaust & Milkshakes v politicians

By Dieuwe de Boer & Jesse Anderson
Right Minds

This is the sixth episode of the Right Minds Podcast, hosted by Dieuwe de Boer and Jesse Anderson, recorded on the evening of Tuesday 21st May, 2019.

  1. Jacinda takes on Facebook, and authoritarianism wins.
  2. David Seymour takes on Golriz Ghahraman (plus the rest of parliament) and wins.
  3. Alfred Ngaro is thinking of starting a Christian political party, but how does he fair when he comes to his first test? He immediately backed down from what could have been a signature policy: challenging the genocide against the unborn.
  4. We also cover the media encouraging political violence against politicians when it comes to throwing milkshakes and egging on those whose views are not in line with the establishment.
  5. Finally, is Brian Tamaki also starting a party and will he do better than Alfred Ngaro?
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Only activism remains when journalism dies

By Dieuwe de Boer
Rightminds

Disclaimer: I haven’t watched Newshub’s “Because It Matters” show, as no one bothered to recommend it to me. I have, however, read a few articles on it and watched a few short related interviews. My interest in this series is due to Paddy wanting to interview me for it (don’t laugh too hard), and you can read about that in an article I wrote last week. Newshub also contacted other conservatives about being interviewed for what they claimed was a little series on ‘right-wing views’.

The main exposé seems to be aimed at one notorious neo-Nazi, Phil Arps. This is a bit short of the rampant white supremacy we were promised, but supposedly it’s just an appetiser. (Let’s hope they didn’t lead with their best, else this series will be a snooze.) Arps is quite a disturbed individual who left a pig’s head at a mosque several years ago and likes to talk about killing Jews and Muslims.

In an interview, Patrick Gower is almost reduced to tears when explaining how Arps only got an $800 fine for this and gloated about it on video. He complains there aren’t harsh penalties and special “hate crimes” for scum like Arps. I hate to break it to you Paddy, but the New Zealand legal system (it would be a crime to refer to it as “justice”) is a joke across the board. Criminals can get home detention for bloody murder. We’ve got rapists and paedophiles walking our streets. How often have you cried about that?

Patrick Gower isn’t too worried about the state of the ex-justice system, he’s just worried that his political enemies might not get the jail time he wants for them.

This is where we come to the main problem with Newshub’s series: it’s not about journalism, it’s just political activism designed to push for changes to our laws.

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Right Minds NZ Podcast #5: Not smoking weed with Elliot Ikilei

By Dieuwe de Boer
Rightminds

This is the fifth episode of the Right Minds Podcast, hosted by Dieuwe de Boer and Jesse Anderson, with special guest Elliot Ikilei, recorded on the evening of Tuesday 7th May 2019.

Elliot Ikilei is the deputy leader of the New Conservative Party.

What we discuss, and debate, with Elliot:

  • The cannabis referendum announcement and his experiences and thoughts on drugs.
  • New Conservative policy on binding referendums and their social conservatism.
  • Education reforms, charter schools, and how to fix problems with public schooling.
  • New Conservative policy on internet filtering and how it relates to pornography and freedom of speech.
  • Elliot’s secret meetings with Don Brash.
  • Thank you to those who have donated for extra audio and video equipment. If you’d like to donate to help out, you can do so here.
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Rightminds Podcast: Slushies, Brian Tamaki, police incompetence & the Crusades

By Dieuwe de Boer
Rightminds

This is the third episode of the Right Minds Podcast, hosted by Dieuwe de Boer and Origen, recorded on the evening of Tuesday 30th April, 2019. Your usual co-host Jesse Anderson was ill, but he sends his regards to his dozens of doting fans. Topics covered are:

  • Simon’s fixation on prison slushy machines. Was this really the right slush fund to focus on when there are so many more important issues?
  • Brian Tamaki’s “prison warfare” with the cabinet over the recognition of his Man Up programme.
  • Massive embarrassment for the police after guns were stolen from a Palmerston North station.
  • More embarrassment for the police as their “secret list” of 100 people under surveillance was leaked to Stuff.
  • A lengthy discussion around the context of the Crusades, and why they weren’t half as bad as Marxist professors make them out to be.

Next week we should be joined by Elliot Ikilei, deputy leader of the New Conservative Party, for what is bound to be a very interesting interview.

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Welcome to the cuddly police state: Here to make sure you feel safe on ANZAC day

By Dieuwe de Boer
Right Minds

A reader has sent in two videos he took on Anzac Day of a man being threatened with arrest for his sign, with the police taking his details, and later trespassing him from an RSA. The front had a picture of the man’s uncle and a tribute to his fighting against the Caliphate, and the other side had a Christian message: quote.

Died of wounds incurred at Gallipoli  fighting against the Islamic Caliphate of the Ottoman Empire — fighting for God, King, and Country.

Allah has no Son and so cannot be the  God & Father of Jesus Christ — the God of Abraham, Isaac & Jacob — the God of the Holy Bible — your Creator & mine. Honour our Fallen Soldiers — Resist Tyranny — Fight for Freedom. end quote.

At one point a police officer says that “people are feeling intimidated and unsafe” after being prompted over and over again for a justification of their harassment.

The context given by Aaron is as follows: quote.

This man attended the Anzac day main event in Titahi Bay.

He had a board honouring his family fighting the Ottomans in Turkey. The other side read that Allah had no son and Jesus was the only way. He didn’t push it, he didn’t preach. People had legitimate questions of their own will and it was peaceful until after the event when a woman asked about his sign. He wasn’t holding it up for anyone to see. He obliged and answered her questions. She inflamed the situation by starting the argument that she was offended. Police then took the man to the middle of the road away from the crowd gathering.

I came towards the police and the constable taller than me tried to push his way towards me to stop recording. I told him that I had every right to record and had to protect the man’s rights. He said it was of no concern to me and threatened me with arrest for obstruction. I said he was welcome to arrest me, but I’m protected by free speech and had to record to protect the man’s free speech. I then moved around towards the man and other 2 officers, at which point I found out I wasn’t recording. That’s where the first video starts.

We then go into the RSA where another older man yelled abuse at the man and he just blew it off that he was just offended by the name of Jesus. We proceed to walk into the RSA where police have already gone into coerce someone to kick the man out for no reason. To which the 2nd video starts. end quote.

The RSA, being a private establishment, is of course perfectly entitled to kick out anyone they want.

That an entire squad of police officers were needed to keep any eye on a harmless man with a rather inoffensive sign on Anzac Day is a bit of a worry though.

Welcome to the cuddly police state: here to make sure you “feel safe”.

Well, do you?

Right Minds NZ Podcast: CGT, worshipping Easter, hate speech & Media propaganda

By Dieuwe de Boer
Rightminds

This is the third episode of the Right Minds Podcast, hosted by Dieuwe de Boer and Jesse Anderson and recorded on the evening of Thursday 25th April, 2019, due to Easter and ANZAC holidays.

In this episode, we discuss:

  • The vanishing Capital Gains Tax and how it kills off the main point of opposition National has been using against Labour. Now Jacinda has moved on to social media crackdowns.
  • The bombing of Christian churches in Sri Lanka, the inability of some politicians to name
  • Christians as victims, and the stupidity of thinking that a ban on “hate speech” will prevent violence.
  • Brian Tamaki’s crusade against the government on hate speech and embracing Islam over Christianity.
  • The media’s function as propaganda outlets with regards to disseminating disinformation, whether about President Trump or local anti-establishment figures.
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Right Minds podcast: Jacinda & Simon, Julian Assange & Notre Dame

By Dieuwe de Boer
Rightminds

This is the second episode of the Right Minds Podcast, hosted by Dieuwe de Boer and Jesse Anderson and recorded on Tuesday 16th April, 2019.

In this week’s episode, we discuss:

  • Israel Folau’s sacking, the obligations of faith, the importance of contracts, and freedom of association.
  • The latest two polls and how they paint a picture of Jacinda Ardern’s popularity and Simon Bridges unpopularity.
  • Julian Assange’s arrest and the morality of WikiLeaks and exposing illegal government activity.
  • The fire at Notre Dame and a featurette of the final recording made on its medieval organ.
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Right Minds Podcast: Free speech, guns, ANZAC Day & more

By Dieuwe de Boer
Rightminds

This is the first episode of the Right Minds Podcast, hosted by Dieuwe de Boer and Jesse Anderson and recorded on Tuesday 9th April, 2019.

We start off by discussing the “hate speech” legislation that Andrew Little is fast-tracking and that is supported by Golriz Ghahraman. That topic naturally led to a discussion about how we risk descending into a police state, the futility of banning guns, and the problem of human evil. We briefly touch on the exodus from social media and we also talk about how terrorism is threatening to change the way the ANZAC Day is celebrated.

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Citizens become criminals on an executive whim

By Dieuwe de Boer
Rightminds

In my submission against the Arms (Prohibited Firearms, Magazines, and Parts) Amendment Bill (aka Tarrant’s Law) I highlighted several embedded clauses that allowed the banning of firearms, magazines, and even ammunition via executive order. I have since been pointed at the source: the new Section 74A which summarises the full extent of these executive powers.

Graeme Edgeler, a Wellington barrister, has identified these as being “Henry VIII Clauses” and he objects to them because they can be used to turn citizens into criminals on an executive whim:

Criminal laws, especially those carrying significant criminal penalties, should be imposed by Parliament, not delegated to regulation. 

It’s not hard to guess where the name for these types of clauses comes from:

The expression is a reference to King Henry VIII’s supposed preference for legislating directly by proclamation rather than through Parliament. 

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