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Words of the week: Toxic masculinity

Guest Post:

By John Black from rightminds.nz

Jack the Ripper, Joseph Stalin, Justin Bieber… the world does not want for terrible men. But are they terrible because they are men? That’s what this week’s Wanker words suggest: there is something about the nature of masculinity itself, whether intrinsic or socially constructed, that is nasty and irredeemable – toxic, in fact.

According to the Wikipedia definition, “traditional stereotypes of men as socially dominant… and masculine traits such as self-reliance and emotional repression” are some of the behaviours considered toxic.

Huh?

Read more »

A guest post submitted to Whaleoil and edited by Whaleoil staff.

Guest Post content does not necessarily reflect the views of the site or its editor. Guest Post content is offered for discussion and for alternative points of view.

Biology 101: Shining cuckoos

A guest post.

The shining cuckoo is a migratory animal. At certain times the migration of cuckoos into the Whaleoil fauna is quite noticeable.

A feature of cuckoos is their bright colouring, which acts as a very good camouflage. Mostly cuckoos are inconspicuous, usually staying among dense comment streams. Their scribblings may be loud and easily recognisable, but sometimes are only given away by the tone, nevertheless they remain willing to bait Oilers in an argument. They can be very difficult to see, often remaining concealed until put to flight.   Read more »

A guest post submitted to Whaleoil and edited by Whaleoil staff.

Guest Post content does not necessarily reflect the views of the site or its editor. Guest Post content is offered for discussion and for alternative points of view.

Identity for me, but not for thee

In the latest social justice outrage, commentator Sean Plunket stated that Golriz Ghahraman abandoned her country and implied that, as a foreign interloper, she shouldn’t be telling people what to teach their children in New Zealand :



Plunket then made the fundamental mistake of apologising for telling the truth. This allowed Golriz to perform her tiresome sanctimonious gloating, while Stuff and other New Zealand media outlets piled on.

Once again, we are shown that apologies never work because you are grovelling to people who don’t like you. Beyond the uselessness of an apology, we learned that the real question the media wanted answered was: Is Golriz a real Kiwi?

Read more »

A guest post submitted to Whaleoil and edited by Whaleoil staff.

Guest Post content does not necessarily reflect the views of the site or its editor. Guest Post content is offered for discussion and for alternative points of view.

Ask me anything: ACT’s maverick in Northcote, Stephen Berry

ACT candidate Stephen Berry

This morning ACT’s ‘maverick’ in Northcote, Stephen Berry, is live on Whaleoil and available to answer your questions. This is Stephen’s second visit to Whaleoil and we welcome him back. His guest post is below.


Up until the beginning of May the Northcote by-election looked like it was going to be the country’s slowest drag race. Two establishment candidates with about as much difference as vanilla and French vanilla ice cream, both seeking a smile-and-wave policy-free campaign with as little controversy as possible.

Having watched the past seven months (at the time) of dreadfully dull politics in which the blue-reds and the red-blues traded accusations that the other was spending less on government programmes than they would have done, I knew that Northcote deserved better. A genuine contest of ideas, bold proposals that can genuinely improve life for the people of Northcote and no more ‘politics as usual’.

Dan Bidois’ comprehensive traffic plan hit Northcote letterboxes last weekend. If you take out all the political fluff, his solutions will fit on the back of a postage stamp. Shannan Halbert has nothing new to add because his government have already announced it: a busway extension and a harbour bridge cycle path. If either of these candidates win Northcote, they’ll immediately fall into party line, vote whichever way they’re whipped and their maiden speeches will be the last we hear of Northcote till 2020.

As the ACT candidate for Northcote, I’m turning this moribund exchange of agreement between the two major party candidates into a proper three-way contest. My first act as Northcote’s MP will be to table a private member’s bill requiring the government to complete the Auckland motorway network within ten years. The first part that needs to be constructed is a second harbour crossing that links Point Chevalier with Kauri Point, stretching through Highbury and Glenfield before meeting with the Upper Harbour Highway.

So, ask me anything!

A guest post submitted to Whaleoil and edited by Whaleoil staff.

Guest Post content does not necessarily reflect the views of the site or its editor. Guest Post content is offered for discussion and for alternative points of view.

Education plans

A guest post.

It is very clear that the coalition is heavily controlled by old-style unionism. That is partly because the unions paid the bills that got them elected and partly because Labour and the Greens have such a paucity of ideas of their own to implement. After nine years of preparation time they had not bothered to do any serious planning and are now relying on all manner of specially set up committees and enquiries to give them ideas on what to do.

It sounds like democracy in action – “let’s ask the people”  until you see that their minds are closed to anything that crosses the unions’ heavy socialist, long-ago-failed thinking.   Read more »

A guest post submitted to Whaleoil and edited by Whaleoil staff.

Guest Post content does not necessarily reflect the views of the site or its editor. Guest Post content is offered for discussion and for alternative points of view.

Kindness called for

A guest post.

As an unbiased observer of the political scene, I find it grossly unfair that National MP Judith Collins should attack our prime minister. It is equally unfair, I put it to you, that Whaleoil should publish her remarks while adding the comment, “Judith Collins should keep holding her feet to the fire.”

Are Whaleoil people not aware that our prime minister is young, a woman and heavily pregnant? These are three reasons why she should be treated by the media, by her fellow parliamentarians and by the people of New Zealand with kindness, compassion, gentleness and respect.    Read more »

A guest post submitted to Whaleoil and edited by Whaleoil staff.

Guest Post content does not necessarily reflect the views of the site or its editor. Guest Post content is offered for discussion and for alternative points of view.

Who is really in charge?

Katrina Casey
Photo: KIRK-ANDERSON/STUFF

The Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, the Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and the Minister of Education Chris Hipkins have said that the charter school transition will be easy. They are our elected leaders and we should be able to take them at their word.

This assumes of course that:

A) They are telling the truth

B) They are the ones in charge

Unfortunately, from where I am sitting, non elected bureaucrats like top Ministry official Katrina Casey have far too much influence and power. Casey, in my opinion, is trying to create a real web and charter schools are getting caught in it.

Read more »

A guest post submitted to Whaleoil and edited by Whaleoil staff.

Guest Post content does not necessarily reflect the views of the site or its editor. Guest Post content is offered for discussion and for alternative points of view.

Don’t just stand there, do something

A guest post:

This was my mother’s immortal saying when she got tired of us hovering around looking gormless and unmotivated. She also said it whenever we criticised the government or the ‘system’. If we wanted to grizzle we had to come up with a solution.

Mum herself had very few outside interests while her husband was still alive as her job was to be at home for Dad, and for the kids. She was a great Mum at making party dresses, having a beautiful garden and later on she joined an organisation she believed in passionately – stopping corporal punishment in school. Not that any of us were strapped or caned, but Dad had major scarring on his hands for speaking Maori at school. Steel inserts in wooden rulers did a lot of damage.

In later years Mum became active in the Labour party as secretary and garden-fair organiser, but she had no impact, or indeed expectation on having an impact, on policy, which was still the male domain.

But we heard the words often: do something. They became embedded in my head.   Read more »

A guest post submitted to Whaleoil and edited by Whaleoil staff.

Guest Post content does not necessarily reflect the views of the site or its editor. Guest Post content is offered for discussion and for alternative points of view.

With a little help from our friends, continued

Hi all my friends and supporters. I am off to theatre for surgery on Monday 14 and the surgeon tells me I will be in hospital for about ten days. Apparently, I have two problems that are interacting with one another. One took me really by surprise. I had cobalt (radiation) treatment in 1972 and this has quietly continued to affect me to this day, causing severe fibrosis (adhesions) which have got worse over the years. I was one of the survivors of the National Women’s ‘Unfortunate Experiment’ and the cobalt treatment was as a result of the lack of correct treatment over the previous ten years. So, it has come back to bite me after all these years.   Read more »

A guest post submitted to Whaleoil and edited by Whaleoil staff.

Guest Post content does not necessarily reflect the views of the site or its editor. Guest Post content is offered for discussion and for alternative points of view.

Incite Politics

A long, long time ago

I was privileged to work in Parliament’s Research Unit at budget time. These were Roger Douglas’s budgets, and one of the most memorable days of my life was being permitted to attend Roger’s pre-speech briefing. This was when key advisors were invited to his rooms while he prepared to go into the house and he would give us key details. It was an incredibly personal experience. He came out of the shower to complete his dressing while he talked to us. So while drying his hair with a towel and running a comb through it, and . . .

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