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Word of the day

The word for today is…

ploce (noun) – 1. – (rhetoric) repetition to gain special emphasis or extend meaning.

Examples:
Ex. 3:14: “I am that I am.”
“In that great victory, Caesar was Caesar!”
“Make war upon themselves – brother to brother / Blood to blood, self against self.” – Richard III, by Shakespeare.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The uncommon English rhetorical term ploce comes via Late Latin plocē from Greek plokḗ, a noun with many meanings: “twining, twisting, braid; complication (of a dramatic plot); construction (of a syllogism); web, web of deceit; (in biology) histological structure; (in rhetoric) repetition of the same word in close succession in a slightly different sense or for emphasis” (e.g., “A man should act like a man”). Greek plokḗ comes from the verb plékein “to weave, braid, twine,” from the Proto-Indo-European root plek-, plok-, source of Latin plicāre “to fold, bend, roll, twine” and the combining form -plex, used in forming numerals, e.g. simplex, duplex, triplex (equivalent to English -fold). The Proto-Indo-European neuter noun ploksom becomes flahsam in Germanic and flax in English. In Slavic (Polish), plek- forms the verb pleść “to plait, weave.” Ploce entered English in the 16th century.

Word of the day

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penumbra (noun) – 1. A partial shadow, as in an eclipse, between regions of complete shadow and complete illumination.
2. The diffuse outer part of a sunspot.
3. An area in which something exists to a lesser or uncertain degree.
4. An outlying surrounding region; a periphery:

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The noun penumbra is composed of the Latin adverb paene “almost” and the Latin noun umbra “shadow.” Paene is not usual in Latin compounds, the most frequent being paeninsula (paeneinsula) “peninsula” and paenultimus (pēnultimus) “almost last, second last,” especially the “second last syllable” (penultimate is often misused in English to mean “ultimate, last”). Penumbra (paenumbra) does not occur in Classical or Medieval Latin; it is a New Latin coinage by the German mathematician and astronomer Johann Kepler (1571-1630). Penumbra entered English in the 17th century.

Word of the day

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palmary (adj) – Of first-rate importance; principal; excellent.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : It was the ancient Romans who first used palmarius to describe someone or something extraordinary. Palmarius literally translates as “deserving the palm.” But what does that mean exactly? Was it inspired by palms of hands coming together in applause? That would be a good guess, but the direct inspiration for palmarius was the palm leaf given to a victor in a sports competition. That other palm—the one on the hand—is loosely related. The Romans thought the palm tree’s leaves resembled an outstretched palm of the hand; they thus used their word palma for both meanings, just as we do with palm in English. Now, when we award a noun with the modifier palmary, it signifies that thing as the choicest among possible examples.

Word of the day

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mordant (adj) – 1. (a) Bitingly sarcastic.
(b) Incisive and trenchant.
2. Bitingly painful.
3. Serving to fix colours in dyeing.

(noun) – 1. A reagent, such as tannic acid, that fixes dyes to cells, tissues, or textiles or other materials.
2. A corrosive substance, such as an acid, used in etching.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The etymology of mordant certainly has some bite to it. That word, which came to modern English through Middle French, ultimately derives from the Latin verb mordēre, which means “to bite.” In modern parlance, mordant usually suggests a wit that is used with deadly effectiveness. Mordēre puts the bite into other English terms, too. For instance, that root gave us the tasty morsel (“a tiny bite”). But nibble too many of those and you’ll likely be hit by another mordēre derivative: remorse (“guilt for past wrongs”), which comes from Latin remordēre, meaning “to bite again.”

Word of the day

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maleficent (adj) – Harmful or malicious in intent or effect.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Doing or producing harm, acting with evil intent or effect,” 1670s, from Latin maleficent-, altered stem of maleficus “wicked, vicious, criminal,” from male “ill” + -ficus “making, doing,” from combining form of facere “to make, do” (from PIE root *dhe- “to set, put”).

Word of the day

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henchman (noun) – 1. A loyal and trusted follower or subordinate, especially one who engages in unscrupulous or criminal behavior on the leader’s behalf.
2. A person who supports a political figure chiefly out of selfish interests.
3. A member of a criminal gang.
4. (Obsolete) A page to a prince or other person of high rank.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The earliest known examples of today’s word in written English show it being used as a term for a squire or a page, but the word may have seen earlier use with the meaning “groom.” It first appeared in Middle English in the 14th century and is a combination of Old English hengest (“a male horse”) and man. In the mid-1700s, henchman began to be used for the personal attendant of a Scottish Highland chief. This sense, made familiar to many English readers by Sir Walter Scott, led to the word’s use in the broader sense of “right-hand man,” which in turn evolved into the other meanings.

Word of the day

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gridiron (noun) – 1. (Football) (a) The field of play.
(b) The game itself.
2. A metal structure high above the stage of a theatre, from which ropes or cables are strung to scenery and lights.
3. (a) A flat framework of parallel metal bars used for broiling meat or fish.
(b) An object resembling such a framework.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Modern gridirons are covered in football players when they’re in use, but the original gridirons were more likely to be covered with meat or fish; they were metal gratings used for broiling food over an open fire. In Middle English, such a grating was called a gredil, a root that gave modern English both gridiron and griddle. How did gridiron become associated with football? That happened in the late 1800s, when a white grid pattern was added to football fields to help enforce new rules about how many yards a team had to gain to keep possession of the ball. From high up in the stands, the lines made the playing fields look like cooking gridirons.

Word of the day

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ghosting (noun) – 1. (Informal) (a) The practice of suddenly ending all contact with a person without explanation, especially in a romantic relationship.
(b) (Also called French goodbye, Irish goodbye) The act of leaving a social event or engagement suddenly without saying goodbye.
2. (Television) the appearance of multiple images, or ghosts, on a television screen.

Source : The Urban Dictionary

Etymology : The dating sense of ghosting is first recorded in 2005–10. It’s possibly linked to the expression get ghost “to leave immediately,” which gained popularity in 1990s hip-hop.

Word of the day

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gallinaceous (adj) – Of, belonging to, or characteristic of the order Galliformes, which includes poultry, pheasants, and grouse.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The adjective gallinaceous comes straight from the Latin adjective gallīnāceus, a derivative of gallīna “hen,” itself a derivative of the noun gallus “rooster, cock.” Further etymology is uncertain: gallus may come from the Proto-Indo-European root gal- “to call, cry.” If so, gallus (from unattested galsos) means “shouter, crier” and is related to Lithuanian galsas “echo,” Polish głos “voice,” and English call (via Old Norse kall). Gallinaceous entered English in the 18th century.

Word of the day

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furlong (noun) – A unit for measuring distance, equal to 1/8 mile (201 metres).

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Furlong is an English original and can be traced back to Old English furlang, a combination of the noun furh (“furrow”) and the adjective lang (“long”). Though now standardized as a length of 220 yards (or 1/8th of a mile), the furlong was originally defined less precisely as the length of a furrow in a cultivated field. This length was equal to the long side of an acre—an area originally defined as the amount of arable land that could be plowed by a yoke of oxen in a day, but later standardized as an area measuring 220 yards (one furlong) by 22 yards, and now defined as any area measuring 4,840 square yards. In contemporary usage, furlong is often encountered in references to horse racing.