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Word of the day

The word for today is…

paragon (noun) – 1. A model of excellence or perfection of a kind; a peerless example.
2. (a) An unflawed diamond weighing at least 100 carats.
(b) A very large spherical pearl.
3. (Printing) A type size of 20 points.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The English noun paragon comes from Middle French, from Old Italian paragone “touch stone,” a derivative of the verb paragonare “to test on a touchstone or whetstone.” The Italian words perhaps derive from Greek parakonân “to sharpen, whet,” formed from the prefix and preposition para-“beside, alongside” and akonân “to sharpen, whet,” a derivative of akónē “whetstone, bone.” Paragon entered English in the mid-16th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

obtuse (adj) – 1. (a) Lacking quickness of perception or intellect.
(b) Characterized by a lack of intelligence or sensitivity.
(c) Not distinctly felt.
2. (a) Not sharp, pointed, or acute in form.
(b) Having an obtuse angle.
(c) Botany Having a blunt or rounded tip.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Early 15th century, “dull, blunted,” from Middle French obtus (fem. obtuse), from Latin obtusus “blunted, dull,” also used figuratively, past participle of obtundere “to beat against, make dull,” from ob “in front of; against” + tundere “to beat,” from PIE *(s)tud-e- “to beat, strike, push, thrust,” from root *(s)teu- “to push, stick, knock, beat” (source also of Latin tudes “hammer,” Sanskrit tudati “he thrusts”). Sense of “stupid” is first found circa 1500.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

nomenklatura (noun) – The privileged set of people appointed by patronage to senior positions in the bureaucracy of the Soviet Union and some other Communist states.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Russian, literally “a listing of positions to be filled,” from Latin nomenclatura.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

Kafkaesque (adj) – 1. Of or relating to Franz Kafka or his writings.
2. Marked by surreal distortion and often a sense of impending danger.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Kafkaesque means “having a disorienting, confusing, nightmarish quality; feeling surreal and threatening,” as, for instance, a form letter from the IRS. Franz Kafka (1883-1924) was a German-speaking Jew born in Prague, Bohemia (now the capital of the Czech Republic). Kafka received a rigorous secular education: he wrote in both German and Czech and spoke German with a Czech accent but never thought himself fluent in Czech. He began publishing his artistic prose in 1908. Kafka’s father, Hermann Kafka (1854-1931), was a clothing retailer in Prague and employed around a dozen people in his business. Hermann Kafka used the image of a jackdaw (kavka in Czech) as the logo for his business. Kafkaesque entered English in the 20th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

fizgig (noun) – 1. a frivolous or flirtatious girl
2. (Chemistry) a firework or whirling top that fizzes as it moves
3. (Angling) a variant of fishgig
4. (Law) (slang Australian) a police informer

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Fizgig has a very cloudy history. The first syllable, fiz (also fis), may derive from the Middle English noun fise or feist “a fart” (cf. fizzle), from the Proto-Indo-European root pezd- “fart,” source of Latin pēdere, Greek bdeîn, and Polish bździeć, all meaning “to fart,” which well fits the sound made by the firework. Gig may be imitative in origin, but the word or words are very problematic, and it is less difficult to state what gig does not mean than what it does mean: “a flighty, giddy girl (cf. giglet, giggle); a top (i.e., the toy); “odd-looking character, a fool; a joke, merriment.” Fizgig entered English in the 16th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

debonair (adj) – 1. Sophisticated; urbane.
2. Gracious and charming in a cheerful, carefree way.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The adjective debonair, from Old French debonaire, originated in Old French as the phrase de bon aire “of good lineage.” The aire of that phrase comes from the Latin noun ager “field,” which presumably meant “nest” in Vulgar Latin. Debonair entered English in the 13th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

crass (adj) – So crude and unrefined as to be lacking in discrimination and sensibility.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1540s, “thick, coarse, gross, not thin or fine,” from Middle French crasse (16th century), from Latin crassus “solid, thick, fat; dense,” which is of unknown origin.

The literal sense always has been rare in English. The meaning in reference to personal qualities, etc., “grossly stupid, obtuse” is recorded from 1650s, from French. Middle English had cras “slow, sluggish, tardy” (mid-15th century), also crassitude “thickness.”

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

bravura (noun) – 1. (Music) (a) Brilliant technique or style in performance.
(b) A piece or passage that emphasizes a performer’s virtuosity.
2. A showy manner or display.

(adj) – 1. (Music) Of, relating to, or being a brilliant performance technique or style.
2. Showy; ostentatious.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The noun bravura is still unnaturalised in English. The word is obviously Italian, ultimately derived from the adjective bravo, which French borrowed from Italian as brave (English brave comes from French). Further etymology of bravo is unclear: some claim it to be from an assumed Vulgar Latin brabus (Latin barbarus) “barbarian” (Roman authors remarked on the impetuous bravery of Celtic and Germanic warriors). The Italian suffix -ura (-ure in French) comes from the Latin noun suffix -ūra. Bravura entered English in the 18th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

truthiness (noun) – (informal) (of a belief, etc) the quality of being considered to be true because of what the believer wishes or feels, regardless of the facts

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Truthiness in the 19th century meant “truthfulness, veracity”; this sense is rare nowadays. Its current sense, “the quality of seeming to be true according to one’s opinion without regard to fact,” was invented by the comedian Stephen Colbert in 2005.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

superluminal (adj) – (General Physics) Physics of or relating to a speed or velocity exceeding the speed of light

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : One of the Latin sources for the English adjective superluminal “faster than the speed of light” is the very familiar prefix and preposition super- “above, beyond.” The second Latin source is the adjective lūminōsus “filled with light, dazzling, luminous” a derivative of the noun lūmen “light, radiance,” from an assumed leuksmen or louksmen, a derivative of the root noun lux (stem luc-) “light.” The same root, leuk- (and its variant louk-) lies behind the Latin noun lūna “moon,” from an assumed louksnā. Superluminal entered English in the 20th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.