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Word of the day

The word for today is…

fantod (noun) – 1. (fantods) (a) A state of nervous irritability.
(b) Nervous movements caused by tension.
2. An outburst of emotion; a fit.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “You have got strong symptoms of the fantods; your skin is so tight you can’t shut your eyes without opening your mouth.” Thus, American author Charles Frederick Briggs provides us with an early recorded use of fantods in 1839. Mark Twain used the word to refer to uneasiness or restlessness as shown by nervous movements—also known as the fidgets—in Huckleberry Finn: “They was all nice pictures, I reckon, but I didn’t somehow seem to take to them, because … they always give me the fantods.” David Foster Wallace later used “the howling fantods,” a favorite phrase of his mother, in Infinite Jest.

The exact origin of fantod remains a mystery, but it may have arisen from English dialectal fantigue—a word (once used by Charles Dickens) that refers to a state of great tension or excitement and may be a blend of fantastic and fatigue.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

epistemological (noun) – The branch of philosophy that examines the nature of knowledge, its presuppositions and foundations, and its extent and validity.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Theory of knowledge,” 1856, coined by Scottish philosopher James F. Ferrier (1808-1864) from Greek episteme “knowledge, acquaintance with (something), skill, experience,” from Ionic Greek epistasthai “know how to do, understand,” literally “overstand,” from epi “over, near” + histasthai “to stand,” from PIE root *sta- “to stand, make or be firm.” The scientific (as opposed to philosophical) study of the roots and paths of knowledge is epistemics (1969).

Word of the day

The word for today is…

gullible (adj) – Easily deceived or duped.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Don’t fall for anyone who tries to convince you that gullible isn’t entered in the dictionary. It’s right there, along with the run-on entries gullibility and gullibly. All three words descend from the verb gull, meaning “to deceive or take advantage of.” The verb was borrowed into English from Anglo-French in the mid-16th century. Another relative is the noun gull, referring to a person who is easy to cheat—a word which is unrelated to the familiar word for a seabird, which is of Celtic origin.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

ecstatic (adj) – 1. Marked by or expressing ecstasy.
2. Being in a state of ecstasy; joyful or enraptured.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Ecstatic has been used in our language since the late 16th century, and the noun ecstasy is even older, dating from the 1300s. Both derive from the Greek verb existanai (“to put out of place”), which was used in a Greek phrase meaning “to drive someone out of his or her mind.” That seems an appropriate history for words that can describe someone who is nearly out of their mind with intense emotion. In early use, ecstatic was sometimes linked to mystic trances, out-of-body experiences, and temporary madness. Today, however, it typically implies a state of enthusiastic excitement or intense happiness.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

propitious (adj) – 1. Presenting favorable circumstances or showing signs of a favourable outcome; auspicious.
2. Merciful or kindly.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Propitious, which comes to us through Middle English from the Latin word propitius, is a synonym of favorable and auspicious. All three essentially mean “pointing toward a happy outcome,” with some differences of emphasis. Favourable implies that someone or something involved in a situation is approving or helpful (“a favourable recommendation”), or that circumstances are advantageous (“favourable weather conditions”). Auspicious usually applies to a sign or omen that promises success before or at the start of an event (“an auspicious beginning”). Propitious may also apply to beginnings, but it often suggests a continuing promising condition (“propitious conditions for an alliance”).

Word of the day

The word for today is…

resurrection (noun) – 1. (a) The act of restoring a dead person, for example, to life.
(b) The condition of having been restored to life.
2. Resurrection (Christianity) (a) The return of Jesus to life on the third day after the Crucifixion.
(b) The restoration of the dead to life at the Last Judgment.
3. The act of bringing back to practice, notice, use, or vibrancy; revival.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : n the 1300s, speakers of Middle English borrowed resurreccioun from Anglo-French. Originally, the word was used in specific Christian contexts to refer to the rising of Christ from the dead or to the festival celebrating this rising (now known as Easter).

By the 1400s, the word was being used in the more general sense of “resurgence” or “revival.” The Anglo-French resurreccioun comes from the Late Latin resurrectio (“the act of rising from the dead”), which is derived from the verb resurgere (“to rise from the dead”). In earlier Latin, resurgere meant simply “to rise again” and was formed by attaching the re- prefix to the verb surgere, meaning “to rise.” Resurgere is also the source of English resurge and resurgence.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

inexorable (adj) – 1. Impossible to stop, alter, or resist; inevitable: an inexorable fate.
2. Not capable of being persuaded by entreaty; relentless.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The Latin antecedent of inexorable is inexorabilis, which is itself a combination of the prefix in-, meaning “not,” plus exorabilis, meaning “pliant” or “capable of being moved by entreaty.” It’s a fitting etymology for inexorable. You can beseech and implore until you’re blue in the face, but that won’t have any effect on something that’s inexorable. Inexorable has been a part of the English language since the 1500s. Originally, it was often applied to people or sometimes to personified things, as in “deaf and inexorable laws.” These days, it is usually applied to things, as in “inexorable monotony” or “an inexorable trend.” In such cases, it essentially means “unyielding” or “inflexible.”

Word of the day

The word for today is…

writhe (verb) – 1. To make twisting bodily movements, as in pain or struggle.
2. To move with a twisting or contorted motion.
3. To suffer emotional or physical distress, as from embarrassment or anguish.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Writhe wound its way into English from the Old English verb wr?than (“to twist”) and is akin to the Old English verb wrigian (“to turn or go”). Wrigian gave us our words wriggle, awry, and wry. When something wriggles, it twists from side to side with quick movements, like an earthworm. When something goes awry, it twists or winds off course, often toward catastrophe. Wry can mean “bent or twisted” but usually implies clever, ironic humor. These days, writhe often suggests the physical contortions one makes when enduring crippling pain or when trying to extract oneself from a tight grasp (as an animal from a predator’s claws). Alternatively, it can imply an emotionally wrenching feeling (as of grief or fear) from which one seeks relief.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

logy (adj) – Characterised by lethargy; sluggish.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Based on surface resemblance, you might guess that logy (also sometimes spelled loggy) is related to groggy, but that’s not the case. Groggy ultimately comes from “Old Grog,” the nickname of an English admiral who was notorious for his cloak made of a fabric called grogram—and for adding water to his crew’s rum. The sailors called the rum mixture grog after the admiral. Because of the effect of grog, groggy came to mean “weak and unsteady on the feet or in action.” No one is really sure about the origin of logy, but experts speculate that it comes from the Dutch word log, meaning “heavy.”

Word of the day

The word for today is…

resuscitate (verb) – 1. To restore consciousness or other signs of life to (one who appears dead).
2. To restore to use, activity, vigor, or notice; reinvigorate:.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The 16th century was a good one for words ending in the suffix -ate. Not only did our featured word, resuscitate, breathe life into the English language but so did the verbs anticipate (“to give advance thought, discussion, or treatment to”), eradicate (“to do away with completely”), estimate (“to esteem” or “to appraise”), and perpetuate (“to make perpetual”). It was a good century for words about words, too—vocabulary, quip, and hearsay all premiered as well.