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Word of the day

The word for today is…

decorous (adj) – Characterised by or exhibiting decorum; proper.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1660s, “suitable, appropriate;” 1670s, “characterized by or notable for decorum, formally polite and proper,” from Latin decorus “becoming, seemly, fitting, proper,” from decus (genitive decoris) “an ornament,” “to decorate, adorn, embellish, beautify,” from PIE root *dek- “to take, accept” (on the notion of “to add grace”).

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

corpocracy (noun) – 1. An inefficient corporation characterised by excessive layers of management.
2. A society dominated by politically and economically large corporations.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Corpocracy is an unlovely compound noun formed from corporate or corporation plus the common combining form -cracy, ultimately from the Greek combining form -kratía, formed from krátos “strength, power,” and the noun suffix -ía. Corpocracy is not a recent word: it first appears in print in 1935, right smack in the middle of the Great Depression, during FDR’s first term.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

circuitous (adj) – 1. Being or taking a roundabout, lengthy course: took a circuitous route to avoid the accident site.
2. Characterised by indirectness, evasiveness, or complexity, as in action or language.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Going round in a circuit, indirect,” 1660s, from Medieval Latin circuitus “full of roundabout ways,” from Latin circuitus “a going round”.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

agora (noun) – 1. A place of congregation, especially an ancient Greek marketplace.
2. An Israeli unit of currency equal to 1/100 of the sheqel.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : In Greek agorá originally meant “assembly,” especially of the common people, not of the ruling class. Agorá gradually developed the meanings “marketplace, the business that goes on in the marketplace, public speaking.” The Greek noun is a derivative of the verb ageírein “to gather,” from the Proto-Indo-European root ger-, gere- “to gather, collect,” source also of Latin grex “flock, herd,” with its English derivatives aggregate, egregious, and gregarious. Agora entered English in the late 16th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

adulation (noun) – Excessive flattery or admiration.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : If adulation makes you think of a dog panting after its master, you’re on the right etymological track; the word ultimately derives from the Latin verb adulari, meaning “to fawn on” (a sense used specifically of the affectionate behavior of dogs) or “to flatter.” Adulation, which came to us from Latin by way of Old French, can be traced back as far as the 15th century in English. The verb adulate, the noun adulator, and the adjective adulatory later joined the language.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

weald (noun) – (Chiefly British) 1. A woodland.
2. An area of open rolling upland.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Old English (West Saxon) weald “forest, woodland,” specifically the forest between the North and South Downs in Sussex, Kent, and Surrey; a West Saxon variant of Anglian wald.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

vespine (adj) – 1. Of, relating to, or resembling a wasp.
2. Of or relating to a vespid wasp of the subfamily Vespinae.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : English vespine is a straightforward borrowing from the Latin noun vespa “wasp” plus the adjective suffix -ine, from Latin -īnus, and one could reasonably–but wrongly–conclude that wespā was the original Proto-Indo-European word for wasp. The original form was wepsā, wopsā, and Latin and English (among other languages) simply metathesized (or transposed) the consonants.

Old English has many different forms for the insect: wæfs, wæps, wæsp, etc. The other Germanic languages also display the -ps- and -sp- forms. Outside Germanic, the extremely conservative Baltic languages have vapsvà (Lithuanian) and wobse (Old Prussian), both meaning “wasp.” The Baltic forms, especially the Old Prussian, also show more clearly the Proto-Indo-European root behind wasp and vespa: webh-, wobh- “to weave” (from the nests that wasps construct). Vespine entered English in the 19th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

normcore (noun) – 1. A fashion style or way of dressing characterized by ordinary, plain clothing with no designer names, often a reaction against trendy fashion.
2. Clothes that conform to this style.

Source : Dictionary.com

Etymology : Normcore has the unpleasant feel of a neologism such as doublethink in George Orwell’s novel 1984. Normcore may be formed from norm (“a standard, the average level”) or normal (“conforming to a standard”); core may simply be from core (“essential part”) or be a shortening of hard-core (“uncompromising”). Normcore entered English in 2014.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

fungible (adj) – 1. (Law) Returnable or negotiable in kind or by substitution, as a quantity of grain for an equal amount of the same kind of grain.
2. Interchangeable.

(noun) – – (often fungibles – Law) Something that is fungible.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Capable of being used in place of another; capable of being replaced,” 1818, a word in law originally, from Medieval Latin fungibilis, from Latin fungi “perform” via phrases such as fungi vice “to take the place.” Earlier as a noun (1765).

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

debunk (verb) – To expose or ridicule the falseness, sham, or exaggerated claims of.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Expose false or nonsensical claims or sentiments,” 1923, from de- + bunk; apparently first used by U.S. novelist William Woodward (1874-1950), in his best-seller “Bunk;” the notion being “to take the bunk out of things.” It got a boost from Harold U. Faulkner’s “Colonial History Debunked” [Harper’s Magazine, December 1925], which article itself quickly was debunked, and the word was in vogue in America in the mid-1920s.

Wets and Drys, Fundamentalists and Modernists, are busily engaged in debunking one another to the delight and edification of a public which divides its time between automobiling and listening-in. Is it art, or education, or religion that you prefer? You have only to get the right station and what you last heard about the matter will be cleverly debunked while you wait. [Carl Vernon Tower, “Genealogy ‘Debunked'”, in “Annual Reports of the Tower Genealogical Society,” 1925]

It was, naturally, execrated in England.

The origin of to debunk is doubtless the same as that of American jargon in general — the inability of an ill-educated and unintelligent democracy to assimilate long words. Its intrusion in our own tongue is due partly to the odious novelty of the word itself, and partly to the prevailing fear that to write exact English nowadays is to be put down as a pedant and a prig. [letter to the editor, London Daily Telegraph, March 2, 1935, cited in Mencken, “The American Language”]

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.