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Word of the day

The word for today is…

courtier (noun) – 1. An attendant at a sovereign’s court.
2. One who seeks favour, especially by insincere flattery or obsequious behaviour.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “One who attends the court of a sovereign,” c. 1300, courteour (early 13c. as a surname), from Anglo-French *corteour, from Old French cortoiier “to be at court, live at court,” from cort “king’s court; princely residence”

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

camouflage (noun) – 1. The concealing of personnel or equipment from an enemy by making them appear to be part of the natural surroundings.
2. Protective colouring or other appearance that conceals an animal and enables it to blend into its surroundings:.
3. (a) Cloth, netting, or other material used for camouflage.
(b) Fabric or a garment dyed in splotches of green, brown, and tan, used for camouflage in certain environments.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1917, noun, verb, and adjective, from French camoufler, Parisian slang, “to disguise,” from Italian camuffare “to disguise,” which is of uncertain origin, perhaps a contraction of capo muffare “to muffle the head.” Probably altered in French by influence of French camouflet “puff of smoke, smoke puffed into a sleeper’s face” (itself of unknown origin) on the notion of “blow smoke in someone’s face.” The British navy in World War I called it dazzle-painting.

Since the war started the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY has published photographs of big British and French field pieces covered with shrubbery, railway trains “painted out” of the landscape, and all kinds of devices to hide the guns, trains, and the roads from the eyes of enemy aircraft.

Until recently there was no one word in any language to explain this war trick. Sometimes a whole paragraph was required to explain this military practice. Hereafter one word, a French word, will save all this needless writing and reading. Camouflage is the new word, and it means “fooling the enemy.” [“Popular Science Monthly,” August 1917]

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

yarborough (noun) – (Games) A bridge or whist hand containing no honour cards (nothing above nine).

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : In bridge/whist, a hand with no card above a nine, 1874, said to be so called for an unnamed Earl of Yarborough who bet 1,000 to 1 against its occurrence.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

volitional (noun) – 1. The act of making a conscious choice or decision.
2. The power or faculty of choosing; the will.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1610s, from French volition (16th century), from Medieval Latin volitionem (nominative volitio) “will, volition,” noun of action from Latin stem of velle “to wish,” from PIE root *wel- “to wish, will”.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

velitation (noun) – (archaic) A fight or scuffle.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : English velitation comes from Latin vēlitātiōn- (stem of vēlitātiō) “skirmish,” ultimately a derivation of vēles (stem vēlit-) “light-armed foot soldier wearing little armor, skirmisher,” which is a derivative from the adjective vēlox (stem vēlōc-) “quick, rapid, speedy” (and the source of English velocity). The vēlitēs, a specialized unit of soldiers in the ancient Roman army, were armed with swords, javelins, and small round shields and were stationed in front of the legionary lines. Before the main action began, these skirmishers threw their javelins at the enemy lines to break up their formation and then rapidly withdrew to the rear of the legionary lines.

Vēlitēs as a type of soldier or unit in the Roman army were relatively brief: they are first mentioned about 211 b.c. in the dark, dark days (for Rome) of the Second Punic War (218–201 b.c.). The vēlitēs were probably formed owing to lowered property qualifications for military service in 214 b.c. and were drawn from the lowest, youngest, and poorest citizens. Vēlitēs are last mentioned in the Jugurthine War of 112-106 b.c.; presumably they were subsumed into the centuries (a company consisting of approximately 100 men) in a later reorganization of the Roman army.

Velitation entered English in the 17th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

vapourware (vaporware in the US) (noun) – New computer software that has not yet been produced and which is likely never to be released or not to work as promised

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : vapour +‎ -ware

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

sophistry (noun) – 1. Plausible but fallacious argumentation.
2. A plausible but misleading or fallacious argument.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Specious but fallacious reasoning,” mid-14th century, from Old French sophistrie (Modern French sophisterie), from Medieval Latin sophistria, from Latin sophista, sophistes. “Sophistry applies to reasoning as sophism to a single argument”.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

silhouette (noun) – 1. A drawing consisting of the outline of something, especially a human profile, filled in with a solid colour.
2. An outline that appears dark against a light background.

(verb) – To cause to be seen as a silhouette; outline.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1798, from French silhouette, in reference to Étienne de Silhouette (1709-1767), French minister of finance in 1759. Usually said to be so called because it was an inexpensive way of making a likeness of someone, a derisive reference to Silhouette’s petty economies to finance the Seven Years’ War, which were unpopular among the nobility. But other theories are that it refers to his brief tenure in office, or the story that he decorated his chateau with such portraits.

Silhouette portraits were so called simply because they came into fashion in the year (1759) in which M. de Silhouette was minister. [A. Brachet, “An Etymological Dictionary of the French Language,” transl. G.W. Kitchin, 1882]

Used of any sort of dark outline or shadow in profile from 1843. The verb is recorded from 1876, from the noun. The family name is a Frenchified form of a Basque surname; Arnaud de Silhouette, the finance minister’s father, was from Biarritz in the French Basque country; the southern Basque form of the name would be Zuloeta or Zulueta, which contains the suffix -eta “abundance of” and zulo “hole” (possibly here meaning “cave”).

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

parlance (noun) – 1. A particular manner of speaking.
2. Speech, especially a conversation or parley.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1570s, “speaking, speech,” especially in debate; 1787 as “way of speaking,” from Anglo-French (c. 1300) and Old French parlance, from Old French parlaunce, from parler “to speak”.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

oligopoly (noun) – A market condition in which sellers are so few that the actions of any one of them will materially affect price and have a measurable impact on competitors.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1887, from Medieval Latin oligopolium, from Greek oligos “little, small,” in plural, “the few” + polein “to sell” (from PIE root *pel- “to sell.”).

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.