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This is why Maori child abuse will not stop

Lindsay Mitchell in her blog yesterday commented on the “outrageous lie” Dame Tariana Turia told in her interview with Ryan Bridge on Magic Talk regarding the removal of Maori children by Oranga Tamariki. Turia thinks Maori are being unfairly picked on. 

Dame Tariana calls this “overkill”, and disputes Te Puni Kokiri (the Ministry of Maori Development)’s statistics that Maori children are six times more likely to die from abuse and neglect than non-Maori.

“The stats aren’t telling us that”, she says. “In the last few years since 1993, we have had 83 non-Maori children killed, we have had 17 Maori children die, so the fact of it is this is an overkill when it comes to Maori families. Now if you don’t want to call it racism, you can call it what you like.”

Lindsay Mitchell Blogspot

Turia said that over 26 years a total of 100 NZ children have been killed by abuse and neglect and Maori make up 17%. But where does she get these numbers from? They do not tally with government statistics.

Mitchell produced these tables from government sources:

Family violence death review committee
Family violence death review committee

Slightly muddied by the fact that the first set represent children under 15 and the second set, children under 19, combined they show that a total of 105 children (or youth) lost their lives in CAN (Child Abuse or Neglect) deaths over the 14 year period and 51 percent were Maori. I take no pleasure in these stats but Turia needs pulling up.

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Transcript: (Part 2) Legalised marijuana in Colorado

Mike:

I was going to ask you about that. You’re not medical of course, but medically speaking are we getting a read on what’s happening there in hospitals and medical clinics?

Ray:

Ah, definitely an increase in visits due to a lot of different things, a lot of psychotic episodes, mental health issues, our rehab clinics and things like that. There is rehab for marijuana.

People say you can’t get addicted to it – that’s absolutely untrue. We have a huge number of people there going through treatment for cannabis and marijuana addiction and then you have individuals. The emergency room rates are sky rocketing as well as poison control rates. You know emergency rooms are seeing people for anything from a variety of psychosis type related episodes to, we have something here called “cannabis hyperemesis syndrome” which people have pretty much a bad reaction to smoking marijuana – high grade marijuana – and they have vomiting episodes and things like that and they end up in the hospital.

And you know people come here for the tourism and they get here and they find out that maybe that marijuana they tried wasn’t such a good idea.

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Transcript: (Part 1) Mike Hosking & Ray Padilla on legalised marijuana in Colorado

Mike:

It was this time yesterday that Chloe Swarbrick was trying to argue that Colorado was the place to look if you wanted to see cannabis legislation as a success story. So, let’s do that and see what’s happened. Ray Padilla is a police officer and president of the Colorado Drug Investigators Association.  Ray, good morning to you.

Ray:

Morning.

Mike:

Appreciate your time very much. On a scale very… start with something broad… on a scale of one to ten, ten being this is the greatest thing you guys have ever done, one a complete bust, what’s your number?

Ray:

One would be it – complete.

Mike:

What’s gone wrong with it?

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Transcript: Susie Ferguson & Simon Bridges on the Treasury leak

Susie:

But Paula and Mark aren’t featuring in this. We are talking about Judith Collins.

Simon:

And then you look across at Jacinda Ardern and her team. Well she’s supposed to be having a reshuffle here. The reality is she won’t do anything because she isn’t blessed with the team and the party vote actually that we’ve got right now.

Look, if she was doing the right thing Phil Twyford would go – now we know that’s not going to happen. And that’s because…

Susie:

Are you calling for his resignation though?

Simon:

Absolutely. Because the reality of the situation is, I’m calling for his demotion, certainly. The reality is that is the most visible manifestation of a Labour party that is failing to deliver on it’s promises.

Susie:

Okay, what about the situation with the budget breach? Do you still want Gabriel Makhlouf, secretary of the Treasury, to go early?

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Transcript: Susie Ferguson & Simon Bridges on Judith Collins & polling

Susie:

Well two major political polls this week made for grim reading for National’s Simon Bridges. Both have the opposition leader being supported by only one in 20 people and both showed there was more support for his colleague Judith Collins.

Asked on morning report yesterday if she thought her leader was doing a good job, Ms Collins has this to say:

“Well I think he’s doing the best job that he can and I think that all we need to do is to do better and everyone has to work very hard together.

But the big issue, from my point of view in my experience in politics, is the more that party talks about itself the less likely people want to listen to them.

And what they do what to know, the public is what we are doing for them and what we want to do for them.”

Well Mr Bridges is in the Wellington studio, ata maria.

Simon:

Morena.

Susie:

Is Judith Collins damning you with faint praise there?

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Transcript: Mike Hosking & Chloe Swarbrick on legalising cannabis

Transcript starts at 8:19

Mike:

Back to the cannabis referendum and the polls out would suggest the majority of us don’t want it – legalisation that is – the TV1 poll, for example, had the numbers at 52/39 I think, eight were left undecided. My editorial on the in column yesterday got all the pro-pot brigade up in arms and demanding replies and one of them is the green MP Chloe Swarbrick. So, in the interests of fairness she is with us. Good morning.

Chloe:

Ata marie Mike.

Mike:

So. when you…

Chloe:

I would just like to say off the bat, definitely not in the pro pot brigade. I am in the pro sensible regulation brigade.

Mike:

Fair enough. And so, when you read my editorial, which I am sure you did yesterday, I didn’t sway you?

Chloe:

No, I mean what I read is you know, you saying towards the end – we are right – and I really wanted to delve into that because who is it? Ah, you know, who are we when you refer to the 52% of New Zealanders who are currently opposed to legalisation? That does go to show that I do have a big job to do. Ah, but stats would indicate across New Zealand that the majority of those people have tried cannabis. And I would ask how do you think the majority of those people have got cannabis or a hold of cannabis?

Mike:

But that’s pointless. It’s a pointless question to ask. They will have got hold of it illegally.

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Transcript: Susie Ferguson & Judith Collins on National party polling & leadership

Susie:

Just while you are here if I can also talk to you about the polls that came out the other day. For you, how does it feel to be polling higher than Simon Bridges?

Judith:

Ah, well it’s um… I just let people see that I’m getting on and doing the job and I’m someone who works very well with the team so I’m just getting on doing my job. It’s always flattering being in those polls and um… I would have to say that most MPs would think it was pretty… pretty flattering to be in there but I also don’t get carried away by it. My job is to… to hold Phil Twyford and the current government to account and that’s what I’m doing.

Susie:

But doesn’t it mean though, that more New Zealanders would like to see you as prime minister than him?

Judith:

Well, I think what it shows at the moment is that um… at the moment we are going to have to work very, very hard towards this next election and one of the best ways of doing that is keeping our heads down and just getting on with the job and not getting all excited about ourselves. And certainly, I’m not someone who gets all excited about myself.

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Transcript: Peter Williams & Simon Bridges on budget leak cover up

Transcript for Magic Talk audio starts at 9:57

Peter:

And how much are you worried about the influence, if I can put it that way, of the speaker in this question time debate tomorrow because it would appear that he might be one of your problems?

Simon:

Ah, well, let me just say this. Um, for the prime minister and those around her to try and hide behind the fact that there is a state services commission… commissioner report on this is totally wrong. And why do I say that? Because the state services commissioner, by his terms of remits of this enquiry that he’s doing, but actually the law, the state services legislation, he is not allowed to look at what ministers and the prime minister did. So, if she seeks to hide behind that – that will be wrong. And, let me be positive about the speaker, I am confident he will seek to uphold my right to ask her about what she, what Grant Robertson, what Andrew Little and others in her cabinet knew about this and why in the end they didn’t act. They sat on a lie.

Peter:

And when do you think Andrew Little was advised by the head of the GCSB that what Makhlouf and then Robertson were about to put out was not true? Do you believe Little had plenty of time to stop those releases going out?

Simon:

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An error in judgement will cost Rugby Australia dearly

Top Aussie rugby player Israel Folau was sacked by CEO Raeleen Castle solely because she mistakenly believes that Folau hates homosexuals. Her “evidence” was Folau posting a scripture on his Twitter feed saying drunkards, adulterers, liars, thieves, fornicators and other biblical sinners, as well as homosexuals, would go to hell if they did not repent. This is not something Folau takes lightly; he preaches this from the pulpit of his home church.

Castle could, and should, have handled this quite differently. Reminding ultra-sensitive gay players that Folau had not launched a personal attack on them and offering mediation for hurt feelings would have been a good start. But that wasn’t all. Apparently Folau’s comments will tip young gay men into killing themselves.

“Rugby league legend Ian Roberts, who was the first elite rugby league player in the world to come out as gay, said the comments were particularly harmful because “there are literally [gay] kids in the suburbs killing themselves … [they’re] confused, not knowing how to deal with it, these type of remarks … can and do push people over the edge.”

The Guardian

It’s a stretch to say scripture condemning homosexuality pushes gay kids over the edge, particularly when they probably give the Bible no credence at all and certainly don’t take it literally as Folau does.

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A few more good reasons not to buy an EV

If our anti-mining government ever bothers to drag its head from the sand it will discover EVs carry some unpleasant baggage and that changeover from fossil fuel to EV production is unsustainable.

The environmentally conscious UK promised 100% of its vehicles would be electric by 2050, but they’ve just realised this will not be possible based on the current supply of raw materials for lithium-ion batteries and future requirements.

“A team of scientists has written to the Committee of Climate Change warning that if the UK’s 31.5 million cars are replaced by electric vehicles by 2050, as is currently planned by the Government, this will require almost twice the current annual global supply of cobalt.

The researchers have also calculated that based on the latest ‘811’ battery technology (80 per cent nickel, 10 per cent cobalt, 10 per cent manganese), UK demand for EV batteries will require almost the total amount of neodymium produced globally each year, three quarter’s of the world’s lithium, and “at least half” of the world’s copper.”

Auto Express UK

And that’s just the UK’s requirements, what about the rest of the world’s need for cobalt, copper, lithium and neodymium?

Our greenies are stuck between a rock and a hard place because they have rejected fossil fuelled vehicles and mining but production of EV batteries is impossible without mining.

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