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Why is National struggling?

Mike Hosking doesn’t blame National’s irrelevance on either the Jami-Lee Ross saga or the Simon Bridges, Paula Bennett leadership combo which appears to be increasing its out of control spiral.

No, Hosking points to National’s basic inability to be concerned about acquiring sufficient numbers to form a coalition government in 2020. He is right; if National are working on coalition partners for the next election, they are awfully quiet about it.

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The subject evoked in the collage is the debating of political issues with friends in a public place

Pablo Picasso
Glass and bottle of Suze (after 18 November 1912)
pasted paper, gouache and charcoal

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Whaleoil Audio: Simon Bridges, Paula Bennett &Jami-Lee Ross

Audio tape of meeting between Simon Bridges, Paula Bennett & Jami-Lee Ross,

Bridges

I’m moving now…to….to act…. but the…the situation is Jami-Lee, we’ve got wider factors going on here, I’ve got media now sniffing around and so I’m very concerned that… if the worst situation is to leave this…and…and so I intend to act. Short of you saying that… will put out the statement we’ve talked to, to demote you in the way I’ve said.  So I suppose, the best I can say Jami-Lee is I urge you to take the much better option for you, and for the caucus, which is to go with the statement and to take some time out.

Ross

Dude, you’re pushing me over the edge here.  I’m not well after Wednesday.

Bridges

The issue is Jami, Jami-Lee… that if I don’t do this it will be (unintelligible) for you.  I give you my 100% assurance that if you go with the statement along the lines we’ve talked about, I will never badmouth you in relation to this.  Privately, publicly on background, off the record in any way.  I will do everything within my power to keep the things we’ve talked about last week out of the public.  I will do everything.  Because actually, as I said to you a number of times, I am trying to have your interests very much front and centre, as well as the wider issues I’ve got to take into account.  And so I come back to you…I come back to it….I urge you to do the statement.  I would then do a statement, a brief stand-up…. I would make it clear, it’s about, you know, whether you want it to be medical, which is clearly part of this, or whether you want it to be family, or whatever about that.  You’re taking time out, I’d be clear there’s no, you know, no wrong conduct or any of those sort of things.  And we’d move through it, and that would be the best way to deal with it.  that. But there is no…. I don’t have the ability now to stop this.  Because I do now have to control this, given the media, given the caucus and so on.

Ross

(Sighs) Can you remind me what the statement is?

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The subject evoked in the collage is the debating of political issues with friends in a public place

Pablo Picasso
Glass and bottle of Suze (after 18 November 1912)
pasted paper, gouache and charcoal

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Palestinians have a double standard and no one cares

Palestinians receive humane treatment in Israeli prisons but do not offer the same humanity to Israelis in Palestinian prisons.

Bassam Tawil is a Muslim Arab writing for Gatestone. He reports on the generous treatment afforded Palestinian dissidents held by Israel, compared to the inhumane treatment of Jewish soldiers held by Palestinians. Quote.

While Hamas has been violating international laws by denying visits or any communication with the Israelis it holds captive, Palestinian terrorists in Israeli prisons continue to enjoy basic rights, including meeting with an attorney, receiving medical treatment, religious rights, basic living conditions (such as hot water, showers and sanitation), proper ventilation and electric infrastructure.

The families of the Palestinian terrorists held in Israeli prisons know where their sons are. They also know that their sons receive proper medical treatment and while away their days reading, exercising and watching TV. But the Israelis held by Hamas can only dream of seeing daylight as they languish in captivity.” End of quote.

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The subject evoked in the collage is the debating of political issues with friends in a public place

Pablo Picasso
Glass and bottle of Suze (after 18 November 1912)
pasted paper, gouache and charcoal

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

‘Thanks, thanks for helping to put us into government’

This is the greeting from the prime minister to delegates at the Labour Party conference this weekend.

No mention of Winston Peters who is arguably the real reason Cindy was propelled into government but she is telling delegates what they want to hear.  Cindy is very good at being economical with the truth, otherwise known as half truths, and making the most of an occasion.

Labour Party Conference 2018 Dunedin

The Otago Daily Times reports on the prime minister’s opening address.  Quote.

[Cindy] reeled off a long list of reforms her Government has enacted in its first year in office – “I’m very proud of that list, but also a little bit exhausted by it as well.” End of quote.

Yes, yes, you’ve concocted a list of “reforms” which is really a wish list, not all are achieved reforms.

One achievement that we did not want was to abolish charter schools. Nice work in preventing Maori and Pacific Island students from a shot at succeeding in an alternative education system better suited to their needs.  It certainly hasn’t been missed that your’re now asking for creative education ideas.  Really?

Other “reforms” are the setting up of over a hundred working groups and KiwiBuild.  Nothing positive achieved yet on these fronts.

The real reason for exhaustion could be that baby Neve still needs her nightly breast feeds, but that’s not something delegates need to hear.

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The subject evoked in the collage is the debating of political issues with friends in a public place

Pablo Picasso
Glass and bottle of Suze (after 18 November 1912)
pasted paper, gouache and charcoal

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Trump chips away to halt the flow of illegals

The latest from Donald Trump is a proposal to change the law so that children born in the United States to visitors do not automatically become US citizens. This would remove the current incentive for illegals to travel to the US for their future children to become US citizens.  Quote.

Donald Trump has revealed he wants to remove the right for children of illegal immigrants born in America to automatically get US citizenship, triggering a heated debate about the legality of such a move.

The US president said he would sign an executive order ending so-called birth right citizenship, which was enshrined in an amendment to the US constitution 150 years ago.” End of quote.

The US 150 years ago did not face the challenges of illegal migration that it does today.  Quote.

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The subject evoked in the collage is the debating of political issues with friends in a public place

Pablo Picasso
Glass and bottle of Suze (after 18 November 1912)
pasted paper, gouache and charcoal

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Laughing banks want more of your money

We work hard for our money and we give it to a bank for safe keeping because it’s better than stashing cash under the mattress. Though not as clever as one enterprising woman of the night who converted her hard-earned cash to gold which she melted into a gold brick and stashed in full view by painting it black and using it as a door stop.

Our money is used by banks to make them more money than we could imagine.  Quote.

 ANZ made a record $1.99 billion profit in New Zealand in the past year.

The 10-digit result is equal to almost 40 per cent of the profits made by the entire banking sector in New Zealand last year. End of quote.

The previous 2017 financial year was not shabby for New Zealand banks either.  Quote.

2017 was a good year for New Zealand banks.

KPMG’s latest Financial Institutions Performance Survey shows the country’s banks had a 7.35 per cent profit boost last year on the year before.

They made a record combined $5.19 billion in the year. End of quote.

Laughing bank image credit dreamstime.com

If you thought your money was safe in a bank, you should think again.

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The subject evoked in the collage is the debating of political issues with friends in a public place

Pablo Picasso
Glass and bottle of Suze (after 18 November 1912)
pasted paper, gouache and charcoal

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Pike River mine re-entry options

Photoshopped image credit: Pixy

Andrew Little has received the report from the Pike River Recovery Agency [PRRA] laying out the three options for the Pike River mine re-entry that we first heard about last June. Quote.

The Agency has identified three safe and feasible re-entry options to recover the drift: 

  • Drive a small tunnel to create a ventilation circuit;
  • Single entry, using the existing main drift access tunnel as the sole means to ventilate the main drift;
  • Single entry with a large diameter borehole.

“I am satisfied that the Agency has been robust in developing the options,” Little said.

Workshops have included technical experts, and partners including New Zealand Police, Mines Rescue, WorkSafe and the Department of Conservation.

The Pike River Families and their representatives have been also included at every stage. The families have shown extraordinary patience and tenacity, and their contribution has been crucial.” End of quote.

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The subject evoked in the collage is the debating of political issues with friends in a public place

Pablo Picasso
Glass and bottle of Suze (after 18 November 1912)
pasted paper, gouache and charcoal

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Whaleoil transcription: Leighton Smith on Karel Sroubek

Leighton Smith

ZB 30 October 2018

Leighton

Identity secret, and then 2017; name suppression lifted, court of appeal rejects bid to quash conviction.

He has been in and out of the courts…police cells on various matters, but connected matters.

He is a crim; how he got off previous charges, like I say, I don’t know because we are not told. But there are usually reasons.

Some of them you might recall from time to time we have had discussions when people have got off on pure technicalities and it seems so frustrating simply because a policeman didn’t cross his “t” – or something similar.

So that to me tends to indicate that there is a strong possibility or at least a low possibility that the …[pause]…why else would the judge keep his name from being published? Why would he have name suppression under those circumstances with the importation of the materials and the manufacture.
I will leave it with you; at this particular point of time, the question being, and still is: do you accept the PM’s backing?

Although to me, it wasn’t a strong backing; she had no choice.

That was me reading between the lines and I was just following her suggestion “read between the lines” that she was backing Lees-Galloway’s decision.


 

 

The subject evoked in the collage is the debating of political issues with friends in a public place

Pablo Picasso
Glass and bottle of Suze (after 18 November 1912)
pasted paper, gouache and charcoal

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Judith Collins cyber-bully?

This is the accusation made by Phil Twyford about Judith Collins when he said she trolled the Facebook accounts of the Auckland owners of the first KiwiBuild home.

New Zealand Labour

Verified account
@nzlabour
1h1 hour ago
More
Outside a brand new KiwiBuild home with proud new homeowners Derryn & Fletch. What an awesome day with ⁦@jacindaardern & ⁦⁦⁦@PhilTwyford⁩ 🏡🏡🏡

Judith responded to Twyford through Twitter:

Judith Collins Twitter comment

The Otago Daily Times reports: Quote.

Housing Minister Phil Twyford is accusing Judith Collins of inciting cyber-bullying of a young couple who just bought their first KiwiBuild home, but Collins has hit back, calling him a liar. End of quote.

The named young professionals purchasing the first KiwiBuild home have since taken down their Facebook pages.

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The subject evoked in the collage is the debating of political issues with friends in a public place

Pablo Picasso
Glass and bottle of Suze (after 18 November 1912)
pasted paper, gouache and charcoal

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Whaleoil Transcription: Mike Hosking & Jacinda Ardern discuss Karel Sroubek’s NZ residency

Karel Sroubek image credit Newshub

ZB 30 October 2018 at 7:45 am

Mike

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is with us this Tuesday morning, a very good morning to you.

Jacinda

Good morning.

Mike

Talk to me about Mr Sroubek and without trying to waste a lot of time with reading between the lines and stuff you can’t tell me, was an investigation undertaken in the Czech Republic regarding why he couldn’t go back, therefore why you granted him residency?

Jacinda

As in did New Zealand officials go into the Czech Republic?

Mike

Correct.

Jacinda

I couldn’t tell you the level of detail around that particular case and that isn’t something we have been getting into.  But what I have made the point around is: if this was simply the case of an individual who was convicted on drug charges who held residency, that would be a straightforward deportation. Straightforward, very straightforward. The fact that it wasn’t a straightforward deportation and that the minister said it was a very difficult decision does give some indication that obviously there were some other pretty hefty matters at play.

Mike

Have you not asked Lees-Galloway what sort of investigation and work has been done on the case?

Jacinda

I’ve had a conversation with him, but again, I’m not going to go into that .…

Mike

No, I understand that part.  But do you know what the rationale is?

Jacinda

Yes, I do. And….

Mike

Would you make the same call?

Jacinda

I support what the minister has done, but I also acknowledge that it was a very difficult decision for him.  And what I am also pointing out now, now, now all of the liability now sits with this individual.  This day and hour notice, anything further is now off the minister’s conscience and it’s on theirs.

Mike

Can you assure us that something more was done as regards his safety back in the Czech Republic than his word?

Jacinda

I can assure you that the minister gave full consideration of all of the facts in front of him and, Mike, it was not obviously an easy decision and I have no doubt that he spent a bit of time talking with officials about the decision that he made.  Keeping in mind as well that this is not something that happens frequently. But it’s also not specific to individual governments of particular stripes.

Mike

Yes, I understand that.

Jacinda

In the last….108 of these decisions, the last minister had to make.  It’s at a level, it’s a discretion that ministers have, and it just points to the difficult job that they have to do, regardless of whether they are National or Labour.

Mike

But the problem with that is that Woodhouse has said all of that, and I realise this isn’t you, I get all that, but this doesn’t appear to come even close to anything he would have granted?

Jacinda

Well again, he doesn’t have the full information in front of him, like in the same way we don’t have the full information on the 108 deportations he cancelled.  You have to rely on the ministers who do have that legal information and have access to the full information without any of the other concerns to make these calls. And I support the minister in doing that.

Mike

But when you say….

Jacinda

And as I say, Mike, it would be obvious otherwise of course we wouldn’t treat lightly someone who is convicted at this level.

Mike

I accept that, I accept that but ….

Jacinda

The minister has had to make a call on some other factors.

Mike

But part of your answer there says “with all the facts in front on him”.  What I want to be reassured is there were a lot of facts that came out of the Czech Republic.  In other words, you did a proper investigation; and this guy who is a crook and a liar didn’t just turn up, spin you a lie and you’ve fallen for it?

Jacinda

Yeah, no.  If you are asking whether or not we are naïve when we make these decisions, you cannot work in this space of …in this field, and just simply rely on people’s word.  Of course, there are [sic] other information provided to individual cases, to back up or support either way, because of course you can’t simply just make decisions made on someone’s word.

Mike

Having been told to read between the lines, I have, and what I have concluded, his life is in danger back in the Czech Republic so, going with that, he then, to make this worse, and this is what I think upset so many New Zealanders, so he’s got his case back in the Czech Republic, he’s on the run, he’s being chased allegedly by crooked cops hence he’s seeking some sort of shelter in this country.  He then, then, goes and smuggles some drugs, gets himself associated with gangs, ends up in jail and insults our hospitality and yet we still want to give him residency?

Jacinda

He’s on absolute notice Mike, because at this point…..

Mike

Well, pfft.

Jacinda

Because what happens to him in the future is not on the minister or the government or New Zealand’s conscience.  It’s on his.

Mike

Well, let me ask you it this way.  Why is he on notice and why is he our problem, why have we made him our problem? Why do we give a monkey’s if he is in danger in the Czech Republic send him back!

Jacinda

Again, this, again is a decision that we are asking one individual member of government to make a call, that’s a pretty difficult call that, you know that ultimately, we all have to live with.  He’s obviously, he’s made the call…for the information he has in front of him, but also set down some pretty solid ground rules for anything happening in the future.  And again, as I say, not an unusual situation, just happens to be one that we are debating live now.  If it were straightforward he would have been deported already.

Mike

So, when he comes out of jail and he can’t get work and he’s on a benefit and we pay for that as well, all of that’s part of the deal, is it?

Jacinda

Hmmm, my…again, I’m probably…might be stepping too far in my understanding of his ability to support himself, you know, but I wouldn’t … that’s not something I have an immediate concern about.

Mike

Why not?

Jacinda

Again, around his ability to support himself.

Mike

So, he’s come here with plenty of money?

Jacinda

No, no that’s not what I’m saying, about just his employment status.  My understanding is he might have had his own business.  But I’m not sure, again Mike; immediate concern for us was making the decision based on the information before us, making the best call that we could.  Obviously, the minister’s done that.  I support him in that.  If this person makes another decision that falls him foul of the law, they [sic] are deported from New Zealand.

Mike

Right. Having said that, even if his life is in danger back in his homeland, and that is what has driven this government’s decision, you’re prepared for him to flout the law to the extent he has, incur the costs to the extent he has, by the taxpayer by being in jail and all that…..

Jacinda

Mike, no one is…no one is sitting here applauding the fact that we are in this situation…

Mike

Well, you’re defending it.

Jacinda

Again, again well I’m defending the fact that we have a set of rules in place, a set of policies and processes that allow one person to have everything in front of them.  Now that weighty job sits with Ian Lees-Galloway.  I bet there’s a lot of people out there that …. wouldn’t want this job right now.

Mike

No, it’s a hard job.

Jacinda

A hard job because obviously….

Mike

Big deal, it’s a hard job!

Jacinda

With the information that some of us have heard it’s an obvious decision, right?

Mike

But then we go back to the cases, and you must have known where this was going, the cases in the public arena this morning of a woman who put the…. who had another name and she put the wrong name on a bit of paper and she’s been deported.  The South African family who offered to pay for their own medical treatment, wanted to stay in the country, they’re booted out of the country. Good hard line and so, no, you’re all gone.  So, suddenly a guy can peddle drugs, sit in jail, cost us a fortune, be on the run and we’re, we’re cool with it?

Jacinda

Mike, we sometimes have to make decisions that aren’t easy ones but we make them because we have a set of principles as a country that has obligations on us.  The same thing happens for extradition and deportation.  As a matter of principle, there are things that we have to factor in, because we are a country that supports… things that often lead to difficult decisions, things like human rights.  And that is difficult. It’s not an easy decision because if it was we would simply….unintelligible.

There are other things at play that weighed on this minister’s mind he’s had to make the tough call, and a lot of us wouldn’t envy having to be in that position.  We also make tough calls on the other direction that do take a sympathetic view to people in difficult immigration situations as well. This just happened to be a case on the uglier side.

Mike

Australia doesn’t seem to have a problem on character, why don’t we have a character rule, whereby, you’re a scumbag, you’re out?

Jacinda

There are a number of tests for people making these applications and one thing I should correct is that this individual actually had residency, aah, granted to them I think 10 years ago.  So, it was slightly incorrect in some of the descriptions to say that he was….

Mike

So, he already had residency 10 years ago under a previous government?

Jacinda

Under a different name, umm so that was…again, this is getting into some of the technicalities of the case.

Mike

So, he got residency 10 years ago under a different name, under a different government and then being represented under a different name under a new government he also gets residency.

Jacinda

Mike.

Mike

In the meantime, having been associated with the gangs and peddled the drugs.

Jacinda

Mike, deep breath.  It is not unusual sometimes for people who made claims, that they are…that their life is at risk to make an application under a false name. That is not unusual, that case was dealt with separately.

Mike

Right.  That part’s not unusual, and you can have some potential sympathy.  The difference in this case is he then went on and associated with gangs, became a drug smuggler and ended up in jail and still got some residency.

Jacinda

And I am not going to defend the actions of this individual. That’s what makes this case so difficult and so ugly.

Mike

By making the decision you’ve made, you are defending it.

Jacinda

I’m defending…. I’m, I’m…what I am pointing out, is that there is obviously other information on the other side of the case, Mike.

Mike

And should that information, given the sort of case, not be forthcoming from the most open, honest and transparent government this country has ever seen?

Jacinda

Then where do we draw a line on putting out every information on every immigration case – that’s a question is asked over?  Sometimes there will be information that we can’t release, but I’m of course trying to make references to some of the things that are already in the public domain.

Mike

Is this decision going to come back and haunt us?  And if it does, what are the consequences for you and Lees-Galloway?

Jacinda

The decisions that ministers make all the time, they have to weigh up in both directions, you know.  Had he made the deportation order, would it come back to haunt us?  Had he not made the deportation order?  This just points to the fact that when you are a minister that has discretion it is a very hard job.

Mike

Appreciate your time.  Jacinda Ardern the prime minister each and every Tuesday morning.

End of recording

 


 

Listen to the Audio here.


The subject evoked in the collage is the debating of political issues with friends in a public place

Pablo Picasso
Glass and bottle of Suze (after 18 November 1912)
pasted paper, gouache and charcoal

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.