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Recipe of the Week

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Mushroom achari

Course: curry, Main dish, mushroom, spicy, vegetarian
Cuisine: North Indian, Punjabi, vegetarian
Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Author: Wally Betts' Sock
North Indian dish served as part of a meal with 2 or 3 other curries and rice and/or naan or chapatis. 'Achar' is hindi for 'pickle',and the oil and spices used in this recipe are those used in Indian pickles. Adapted from a Sanjeev Kapoor recipe.

Ingredients

  • 40-50 button mushrooms
  • 3 tbsp mustard oil
  • 1/4 tsp asafoetida powder hing
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds jeera
  • 1/2 tsp onion seeds kalonji
  • 1/2 tsp fennel seeds saunf
  • 1 tsp mustard seeds sarson
  • 1/4 tsp fenugreek seeds methi dana
  • 1 medium onion chopped
  • 2 tbsps ginger-garlic paste
  • 1 1/2 tsp Kashmiri chilli powder
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric powder
  • 1/2 tsp black salt kala namak
  • sea salt to taste
  • 3 tbsps rice vinegar
  • 1 tbsp chopped coriander leaves

Instructions

  1. Wipe the mushrooms with a damp cloth. Separate the caps from the stems.
  2. Roughly chop the stems and finely slice the caps.
  3. Bring the oil to high heat in a non-stick pan.
  4. Remove it from the heat, add the asafoetida and all the seeds and allow to fry for a minute or so.
  5. Add the onion and the mushroom stems. Cook, stirring, on a high heat for two minutes.
  6. Add the chilli powder, turmeric and black salt. Mix well.
  7. Add the vinegar, return to the stove on moderate heat. Cook until nearly dry (4-5 mins)
  8. Add the coriander leaves, stir in, transfer all to a serving dish and serve hot.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

John Roughan on Goff’s censorship

Auckland mayor and enforcer of the Hecklers’ Veto, Phil ‘gutless’ Goff

John Roughan takes exception to Phil Goff’s assault of free speech: Quote:

Like many of us this week no doubt, I’ve put the names Lauren Southern and Stefan Molyneux into the search engine, curious to find out why the Mayor of Auckland considers their views too dangerous to be given a public platform in our fair city.

The search turned up video clips of Southern, a young Canadian holding a microphone in the middle of a demonstration. A woman with a nose ring was berating her for insisting there are only two genders in this world. Another clip showed her invading a woman’s march against sexual harassment. She was asking the marchers whether they wanted “women’s rights or Islam?”

She opposes unchecked immigration, particularly if it’s Islamic, and she has exposed something that worried me when an Economist report mentioned in passing that Italian naval craft were going almost to the North African coast to pick up “refugees” who had only to jump out of a boat.

Southern is essentially a journalist who asks unwelcome questions, questions that lurk in the mind of probably all of thinking people and challenge the dominant sympathies of the mass media today.

Molyneux is an intellectually heavier proposition. He subscribes to a theory that IQ differs between ethnic groups and claims it is based on US Army records of IQ tests of its ranks over the years. He is very glib and very serious. He doesn’t foam at the mouth. He says he doesn’t want to believe the results of his research but has no choice. It leads him to conclusions you are not allowed to say these days. End quote.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Is Phil Goff telling lies again?

Last weekend a story hit about Phil Goff and his sneaky plans for a toilet tax. Judith Collins had been digging and found out that Goff’s Auckland Council were sneakily trying to implement a toilet tax: Quote:

Auckland mayor Phil Goff says costs to ratepayers could be little different if a new entity was formed to takeover a $1.2 billion pipeline project.

Council and government officials are exploring whether shifting the 13km central interceptor project into a crown-owned company is practical, with construction due to begin next year.

The idea is complex, but if workable would shift the project debt off the council’s books and give it more financial capacity to accelerate other work.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Karl du Fresne destroys Simon Wilson’s heroic defence of Phil Goff’s attack on free speech

Karl du Fresne destroys Simon Wilson’s rather wonky defence of Phil Goff’s scurrilous attack on free speech: Quote:

The left is performing all sorts of elaborate intellectual contortions to justify the banning of Lauren Southern and Stefan Molyneux. Simon Wilson, who naturally leans sharply to the left, has made a sincere attempt in the New Zealand Herald today to write a balanced analysis of the issue, and he nearly pulls it off. But his ideological convictions ultimately come through and sadly it becomes just another apologia of the “I’m all for free speech, but …” variety.

He gives himself away early in the piece with his casual use of the loaded term “white supremacists” to describe Southern and Molyneux and by dismissively referring to the Free Speech Coalition as an “outfit”. I note that Simon apparently doesn’t view the NZ Federation of Islam Associations as just an “outfit”, with all that word’s negative connotations.

He drags a few red herrings across the reader’s path: flaming crosses on the lawn, that sort of stuff. There are ample remedies under existing law for people who directly threaten harm or violence, so I’m not sure whether that type of emotive imagery gets us any further. End quote.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Trump lashes May

Donald Trump has given Theresa May a right bollocking, not undeserved either. Quote:

Donald Trump has launched an extraordinary attack on Theresa May in a scathing interview with the British press.

Speaking with The Sun’s political editor Tom Newton Dunn, Trump slammed the British prime minister over her Brexit plan, negotiation skills and trade stance, even saying her political nemesis Boris Johnson — who resigned earlier this week — would “make a great Prime Minister”.

The interview couldn’t come at a worse time for May, who is currently in a vulnerable political position.

Her proposal for the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union — which the majority of Brits voted in favour of in 2016 — has been deemed too “soft” by the movement’s more conservative supporters.

Three senior government ministers recently quit over the issue. Johnson sensationally quit on Monday after telling May the Brexit “dream was dying”, expressing his fears the UK would be reduced to a “colony” status.

Brexit Minister David Davis and minister for the Department for Exiting the EU Steve Baker also quit the government in protest.

No leadership challenge has emerged yet, but several British media reports suggest backbenchers may be waiting until Trump’s four-day visit concludes to demand that she resigns.

And this interview could be the thing to push them over the edge. End quote.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Minister for Open Government busted in another secret meeting

Clare Curran has been busted in another secret meeting, this time with a lobbyist for Google at a swanky Wellington club: Quote:

At least two Cabinet ministers attended a dinner at an exclusive club hosted by Google’s top lawyer under secretive “Chatham House” rules, but made no notes of what was discussed.

National open government spokesman Nick Smith blasted their attendance, accusing Labour of hypocrisy. 

Google’s chief counsel, Kent Walker, hosted the dinner at the capital’s swanky Wellington Club for invited guests who included Justice Minister Andrew Little, Open Government Minister Clare Curran and top public servants and lawyers.

[…]    Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Urgent: Free Speech Coalition update

With the Free Speech Coalition achieving its initial fundraising goal, they’ve briefed lawyers who are busily preparing papers to serve on the Auckland Council. I donated to the cause, and I know that many Whaleoil readers did too. We did so to stand up to the mayor’s outrageous banning of people whose views he disagrees with. I can’t wait to go to court with the popcorn.

I have been contacted by the lawyers working for the Freedom of Speech Coalition. They have asked for our help to find people to join as parties with the Free Speech Coalition (with the coalition paying the legal fees and indemnifying those who lend a hand). I understand this would involve swearing an affidavit as part of the Free Speech Coalition’s application for an injunction.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Sealegs competitor runs aground in copyright case

Orion system installed on Stryda Marine boat fails on sea trials

Sealegs has won a massive copyright case against a competitor formed by ex-Sealegs staff.

NBR reports on the substance of the case: Quote:

A High Court judge has found Sealegs International had its copyright infringed by Orion Marine, Smuggler Marine and various other people associated with the rival business.

In ruling in favour of Sealegs, Justice Paul Davison found its former employees, Darren Leybourne and Vladan Zubcic, had appropriated the core of the Sealegs system when they set out to create an amphibious system for Orion after leaving Sealegs.

Sealegs had already won an interim injunction restraining engineering firm Orion, as well as boatbuilder Smuggler Marine, producer of a vessel using the Orion system, from marketing the rival system. It will now be able to seek damages or an account of profits from Orion.

Sealegs’ amphibious system features retractable legs, which enable boats to be driven over land and into and out of water. It was created by Maurice Bryham in 2000 and has since achieved commercial success, Thursday’s court judgment says.

Orion was created in 2012 to compete with Sealegs, by Mr Leybourne and another defendant, Yun Zhang. Mr Zhang had been a homestay student with Mr Leybourne’s family when he was a student and later discussed with Mr Leybourne setting up the company and moving to New Zealand on an entrepreneur’s visa. He told the court he had permanent residency from 2017.

Mr Leybourne said he had received the judgment only last night and would take some time to consider it with his legal advisers before deciding whether to appeal.

“It’s obviously not what we expected,” he said.

Sealegs has since been renamed Future Mobility Solutions. Its chief financial officer David McKee Wright, former chief executive of Sealegs, was not immediately available for comment. End quote.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Do the government really think that splashing a bit of cash here and there in Taranaki is going to mitigate their economic treason?

Do the government really think that splashing a bit of cash here and there in Taranaki is going to mitigate their economic treason?

It appears so: Quote:

A Taranaki energy company has received $950,000 from the Provincial Growth Fund to develop zero-emission hydrogen fuel.

Acting Prime Minister Winston Peters announced the funding during a visit to New Plymouth today.

The money will go to Hiringa Energy and partners to scope the design and engineering of two hydrogen generation facilities, mobile storage and distribution containers and up to three refuelling stations.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Don’t act all surprised Twyford… you reap what you sow

Phil Twyford is surprised he was accosted by Tauranga residents angry at his obfuscation on fixing one of the most deadly roads in the region.

Twyford, of course, is copping flack because he is dragging his feet after pulling the pin on a major roading project and people are over his bullshit. Quote:

Transport Minister Phil Twyford was bailed up over funding to fix State Highway 2 while visiting Tauranga yesterday afternoon.

Twyford, in town to visit new homeless housing service The People’s Project, was doing a television interview on Grey St when a woman approached.

She asked him what he was going to do to fix the problems on State Highway 2.

He initially criticised National for doing “nothing” to improve the road during its nine years of Government, but the woman wanted a firm answer on his Government’s plans.

“We’re going to invest in that road,” Twyford told her. “It will be safe.”  

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.