Archives

Cannabis legalised in Canada

Canada legalises cannabis. 1 News reports:

Canada’s Senate has given final passage to the federal government’s bill to legalise recreational cannabis, though Canadians will have to wait at least a few months to legally buy marijuana.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government had hoped to make pot legal by July 1, but the government has said provincial and territorial governments will need eight to 12 weeks following Senate passage and royal assent to prepare for retail sales.

Trudeau’s Cabinet is expected to decide a legalisation date in early or mid-September.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

US withdraws from United Nations human rights council

Good to see that the US has carried through with its threat to withdraw from the dysfunctional UN Human Rights Council.

The Guardian reports: Quote:

The US is withdrawing from the United Nations human rights council, the Trump administration announced on Tuesday, calling it a “cesspool of political bias” that targets Israel in particular while ignoring atrocities in other countries.

The US ambassador to the UN, Nikki Haley, said she had traveled to the council’s headquarters in Geneva a year ago to call for reforms, to no avail.

“Regrettably it is now clear that our call for reform was not heeded,” Haley told reporters at the state department. “Human rights abusers continue to serve on, and be elected to, the council.”

She added: “The world’s most inhumane regimes continue to escape scrutiny and the council continues politicising and scapegoating of countries with positive human rights records in an attempt to distract from the abusers in their ranks.”

“For too long the human rights council has been a protector of human rights abusers and a cesspool of political bias.” End quote.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Whinging unionists are overpaid and take too many sickies

The Taxpayers’ Union has been pushing back against whinging from public sector unions. From their new report:

  • The gap in weekly earnings between the public and private sectors has grown since 1990, from 18.9% of private sector earnings to 34.6% in 2017. The gap peaked in 2010 at 38.4%. The premium is even higher for hourly earnings (as public sector employees, on average, work fewer hours).
  • If the Government had retained a public sector earnings premium of 20%, taxpayers would save $2.5 billion per year, or $1,445 per household in lower taxes or reduced Government debt.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Oral Questions – 20 June 2018

Questions to Ministers

  1. SIMON BRIDGES to the Prime Minister: Does she stand by all her statements and policies?
  2. AMY ADAMS to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by the statements and policies of this Government regarding New Zealand’s economy?
  3. Dr DUNCAN WEBB to the Minister of Finance: Will this Government’s Families Package support low- and middle-income families; if so, how?

    Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Tell me again why we are wasting billions on light rail

Phil Goff and Phil Twyford are intent on pouring billions of dollars into light-rail to the airport. There isn’t a business case, nor the money to do it.

But why even bother when we should be encouraging enterprising private companies willing to spend their own cash on building a much faster solution: Quote:

Auckland could be one of the first cities in the world to use Uber’s electric aircraft, as the company works with Boeing to make flying taxis a reality.

The San Francisco-based ridesharing company is considering Auckland as a third city for the trial of Uber Air flights in 2020, and hopes to launch the service in 2023. End quote.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

William Hague says the war on drugs has failed and the UK should legalise cannabis now

William Hague, former leader of the Conservative party in the UK has written an opinion piece in The Telegraph about legalisation of cannabis. Quote:

The case of Billy Caldwell, the 12 year old with epilepsy whose vital cannabis oil medication was confiscated by Border Force officials to comply with UK drugs laws, provides one of those illuminating moments when a longstanding policy is revealed to be inappropriate, ineffective and utterly out of date.

That our border officials, with so much to deal with to prevent the smuggling of arms, people, wildlife and much else, should be expected to make off with a medicine that contains a tiny quantity of the psychoactive element in marijuana but had clear benefits for a boy with severe seizures, is beyond ridiculous. It suggests that official intransigence is now at odds with common sense.

Over the weekend, the Home Office sensibly backed down and returned Billy’s medicine. By doing so, it implicitly conceded that the law has become indefensible. It must now be asked whether Britain should join the many other countries that permit medical-grade marijuana, or indeed join Canada in preparing for a lawful, regulated market in cannabis for recreational use as well. End quote.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Actually Simon, most Aucklanders don’t support road maggots

Simon Wilson, reprising his current role as the ex officio spokesman for Phil Goff’s office, has made astonishing claims based on an online survey regarding cycling: Quote:

Two-third of Aucklanders (65 per cent) believe cycle lanes are good for the city and welcome them in their own communities, according to the results of an annual survey commissioned by Auckland Transport (AT).

Support for cycling overall is at 57 per cent, with 34 per cent saying they are “very supportive”. Those not supportive of cycling are at 11 per cent, with 8 per cent “very unsupportive”.

Those figures suggest cycling supporters outnumber opponents by five to one. But they also show that most people in either camp feel strongly: they’re likely to be very supportive or very opposed.

The survey was conducted online among 1459 respondents during April. Responses were weighted to ensure a representative spread of age, gender and location.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

More unintended consequences from womble ministers

Electric vehicles, virtue-signalling and living green are pretty much the preserve of the urban elite, and load disproportionate costs onto the poor. But green wombles don’t care: they are saving us from ourselves, don’t you know.

Now there is some evidence that this left wing, protect the poor, party is actually passing laws that will hurt the poor: Quote:

Fighting climate change could slow economic growth, but it wouldn’t stop it, economic modelling commissioned by the Government shows.

Low-income families could be some of the worst hit, leading Climate Change Minister James Shaw to say Government help for those families would be key during any transition.

He said any possible “marginal” cost to the economy would “an entirely reasonable price to pay for the continued existence of human civilisation.”

“The difference between our existing 2050 target and a net zero emissions target could be in the range of 0.2 per cent GDP – a pretty marginal difference.”

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Hosking on union strife under Labour

The nurses appear set to strike, the teachers are getting stroppy and the PSA is muscling up. Looks like the winter of discontent is coming from the civil servants not business.

Mind you business isn’t happy either. Mike Hosking says that strikes achieve nothing and drag us back to the 70s: Quote.

Looks like we are heading for a winter of discontent.

Nurses, IRD, MBIE, Burger King, Events Cinema, teachers, principals – have I missed anyone yet?

Thousands upon thousands are currently spending their hard earned time and energy working out whether they want to take some form of industrial action. It has been many a year since we have seen this sort of pending disruption in our workforce.   

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Oral questions: 19 June 2018

Questions to Ministers

  1. KIRITAPU ALLAN to the Minister of Finance: What feedback has the Government received on the Families Package?
  2. SIMON BRIDGES to the Prime Minister: Does she stand by all her statements and policies?
  3. AMY ADAMS to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by the statements and policies of this Government regarding New Zealand’s economy? Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.