Crime

Half an inch when fully reared, when lying down it disappeared…

Or so the saga of Tiny O’Toole goes. Meanwhile, in a courtroom in Wellington, some bloke is having to go back to the cells to have his todger measured by a doctor. I kid you not: Quote:

Kāpiti councillor David Scott’s penis has been measured for the jury hearing a charge of indecent assault against him.

Dr Bernard Cammack, who was giving evidence about Scott’s diabetes and an operation on his patient’s genitals, was asked by the defence to take Scott into the cells and provide measurements.

Moments later he returned to court and gave them to the Wellington District Court jury. The measurements have been suppressed. End quote.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Are NZ First soft on crime like Labour?

Andrew Little has confirmed that he is going to get rid of the ‘three strikes’ law, but he needs NZ First to do it because Labour and the Greens won’t have the numbers. Quote:

The “three-strikes” law is likely to be scrapped as part of a major overhaul of the criminal justice system and National is calling on NZ First to stick to its principles and keep the controversial law in place.

Justice Minister Andrew Little confirmed he was considering the repeal of the three-strikes law as part of a wider reform of the criminal justice system which aims to reduce the prison population. End quote. 

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Labour now have two choices: Catch and release or triple bunking

Labour are set to show that they are incredibly soft on crime now that they’ve cancelled the new prison at Waikeria. The NZ Herald reports: Quote:

The Government has abandoned plans for a mega-prison in the Waikato, but has not yet revealed its back-up plan.

The Corrections Department has sought approval to upgrade Waikeria Prison near Te Awamutu to 3000 beds, but Cabinet has repeatedly delayed a decision on it.

Corrections Minister Kelvin Davis said today that it would not be approving Corrections’ proposal.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Yes Nanaia dear, that’s the general idea

Nanaiapotamus

Nanaia Mahuta, the Tainui Princess aka Nanaiapotamus, doesn’t want to build a new prison in her electorate because… if you build it, it will get filled up with prisoners: Quote:

The government may not be going ahead with the mega prison at Waikeria, after the Maori Development Minister said today they would not throw “$1 billion at a prison in Waikeria“.

In March, Justice Minister Andrew Little appeared on Marae, and said a decision would be made based on what Minister of Correction Kelvin Davis recommends.

He said a package developed by himself, Mr Davis and Minister of Police Stuart Nash would look at offending rates, the corrections system, the age of some of the prisons, “and what we need to do to make a more humane prison and corrections system in the long term”.

Appearing on TVNZ1’s Marae, Nanaia Mahuta was answering a question from National MP Jami-Lee Ross about what the budget meant for struggling families.

We aren’t going to throw 1 billion dollars at a prison in Waikeria. We want to put it into the regional economy,” Ms Mahuta said today.

“That will be something that will grow the economy, create jobs and opportunities that undoubtedly will see iwi benefit, will see Maori whanau benefit.” End quote.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Why can’t media and Labour see the crime correlation?

Stuff had a big story yesterday headlined “There’s less crime but more people in prison“.

They have some fancy interactives:

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

The best way to stop a bad guy with a gun is…

The best way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good off-duty cop with a gun: Quote:

This is the moment a gunman’s attempted robbery on young children and families was foiled by a waiting mother – who turned out to be an off-duty armed policewoman.

Dramatic security footage shows a suspect named as Elivelton Neves Moreira, 21, approaching the crowd with a gun outside a private school in Sao Paulo.

But his attempted crime backfired when military police officer Katia da Silva Sastre, 42, pulled out her own weapon and unleashed three shots.

The video shows Moreira, who later died in hospital, falling backwards and clutching his chest before Sastre shoves him on to his front with her foot having thrown her handbag aside on Saturday morning.

Officer Sastre is being hailed a hero for her act of bravery and was honored in a ceremony by Sao Paulo Governor Márcio França on Sunday.

Although the suspect died later the same day in the hospital from his injuries, Officer Sastre is still being commended for her actions despite the ‘regrettable’ outcome.

Writing on Twitter Governor França said: ‘I went earlier to the 4th BAEP in the east of Sao Paulo to honor a very special mother: Corporal Katia Sastre. Her courage and precision saved mothers and children, yesterday at the door of a school.’

As a thank you for her off-duty valor, the governor then presented her with a purple orchid plant at her police station, fittingly on Brazil’s Mother’s Day. End quote.

Excellent. That’s how you stop armed robbers. Quote:

The horrific attack unfolded Saturday as Sastre was waiting for the gates of Ferreira Master school to open.

A bandit, dressed in a black jacket, casually walked up and announced it was a robbery while pointing a .38 revolver at the group of terrified mothers and small children.

The school, in the Jardim dos Ipês suburb of the city, was due to host a Mother’s Day party.

Pointing the firearm at the school’s security guard and reaching out to grab the man’s wallet and phone, the suspect suddenly stopped in his tracks by the officer, who had her gun at the ready after being alerted to the danger by another woman seconds earlier.

Pulling her police issued weapon from her bag, she loads the gun then reacts with speed, stepping forward and firing off three rounds, shooting the assailant in the chest and leg as he tries to fire back.

The armed man falls backwards onto the zebra crossing and releases two shots in the process as he hits the ground. The first one ricochets off the ground hitting no one, and the second jams in the weapon.

Sastre quickly backs away out of the line of fire then goes over to the injured suspect who is rolling around on the ground in agony crying out for help. She kicks away his weapon before picking it up. End quote.

Three holes in him, oh dear, how sad, never mind. He won’t be robbing any more parents at school.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Good to see a media company copping some legal action for using hacked data to run stories

It’s good to see a media company copping some legal action for using hacked data to run stories: Quote:

Vector has applied for a High Court injunction to stop Stuff making further use of customer data leaked to the news site. It wants the files returned or destroyed.

Stuff tells NBR the files have been destroyed already, but Vector says it has heard nothing, and still has several issues with the way the publisher used the data (keep reading). End quote.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Pieces of work that are brainwashing the community into thinking Maori are dishonest: Six

Contrary to popular urban myth, offenders really have to try hard to get into prison

Cameron has already covered this but here is my take:

National MP Judith Collins has been the minister of corrections twice. The first time was from 2008 until 2011 and the second time was from 2015 until 2016. In a Facebook post, she explains that during her time as the minister of corrections she visited almost all the prisons in New Zealand and met many of the staff including the volunteers. She writes: Quote:

I get very disappointed when I hear or read the usual apologists for the Labour/Greens soft on crime approach make the most derogatory statements about the efforts that go into assisting offenders to improve their literacy, their work skills and their behaviour. Contrary to popular urban myth, offenders really have to try hard to get into prison. When people wonder why someone is in prison for what they’re told is an offence that someone else isn’t sent to prison for, these differences in sentencing are often down to criminal records. In essence, if an offender has 90 criminal convictions ( unfortunately this is not that uncommon) we should expect that a Judge is unlikely to put down their latest offending as a one-Off.

Read more »

If you agree with me that’s nice, but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo, look between the lines and do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

Listen to this post:

Hosking takes Little to task over bail changes

Mike Hosking doesn’t hold back with his column attacking Andrew Little over his proposed bail law changes: Quote:

Ask yourself this: what good can possibly come from Andrew Little’s seeming fixation with loosening bail conditions, and generally looking to have fewer people in jail?

The Justice Minister’s answer, of course, is we have less reoffending, fewer criminals and that leads to fewer jails and less expense. In theory, nothing wrong with it. But bail? What’s his fixation on bail? A person is arrested and charged, bail is applied for, police oppose it and a judge makes a call. At this point, what are the risks?

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post: