Defense

The capture of Le Quesnoy

 

One of the more little-known actions that occurred during the Hundred Days Offensive of 1918 was the capture by New Zealand troops of the tiny French fortified village of Le Quesnoy.

The battle took place on the 4th of November, 1918 and the combatants had no idea that the ultimate end of the previous four years of bloodletting would finally be drawing near in a week’s time.

Beginning in the early hours, the New Zealand Rifle Brigade advanced from its starting position east of the town, aiming to surround it and link up on the far side. Once this had been achieved and the division proper had moved off, it was left to the Rifle Brigade to capture the village itself.

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ORANGE

  • A large round juicy citrus fruit with a tough bright reddish-yellow rind.

AMBER

  • Hard translucent fossilized resin originating from extinct coniferous trees of the Tertiary period, typically yellowish in colour. It has been used in jewellery since antiquity.

ORINJAMBA

  • Fifth generation Kiwi, social-political writer who left the Left sometime back and turned right. Heavily reliant on spell check with hopefully the intelligence to admit when he’s wrong and the humility to see the truth, irrespective of where it’s found.
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The Battle of Long Tan

ABC
Painting of Battle of Long Tan

 

Few other military engagements come closer to encapsulating the ANZAC spirit than the Battle of Long Tan which took place in August of 1966.

This battle has largely been forgotten by the general public due in no small measure to the unpopular nature of the war it occurred in. But the overwhelming odds which were eventually overcome in this engagement is testament to the long history of brotherhood and cooperation New Zealand and Australian forces have developed over the years.

I will not go into great detail regarding the breakdown of this battle here for there is not the time to do it justice however for a comprehensive analysis I would recommend “The Battle of Long Tan: As Told by the Commanders” written by Robert Grandin.

In short though, Long Tan has become somewhat of a byword in military circles as a good case study in the effective coordination of infantry, armour, artillery and aviation on the modern battlefield.

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ORANGE

  • A large round juicy citrus fruit with a tough bright reddish-yellow rind.

AMBER

  • Hard translucent fossilized resin originating from extinct coniferous trees of the Tertiary period, typically yellowish in colour. It has been used in jewellery since antiquity.

ORINJAMBA

  • Fifth generation Kiwi, social-political writer who left the Left sometime back and turned right. Heavily reliant on spell check with hopefully the intelligence to admit when he’s wrong and the humility to see the truth, irrespective of where it’s found.
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Monument unveiled in Fiji for RNZAF flying boat veterans

Laucala Bay veterans and current RNZAF personnel in front of the monument

Regular readers know I was born in Fiji, and where we lived at Suva Point (Statham Street) was just around the corner from the old RNZAF flying boat base.

The NZDF reports on a new monument commemorating the Kiwi servicemen and women who served at Laucala Bay:

A commemorative monument has been unveiled in Fiji to recognise the service of veterans from the Royal New Zealand Air Force’s (RNZAF) flying boat operations, based at Laucala Bay in Suva, from 1941 to 1967.

RNZAF’s No. 5 Squadron conducted anti-submarine patrols, maritime reconnaissance and transport and air-sea rescue missions, flying Short Singapore, Consolidated Catalina and Short Sunderland aircraft.

The monument, designed and made in Fiji, was unveiled yesterday by Fiji Prime Minister Josaia Voreqe Bainimarama and New Zealand Defence Minister Ron Mark at the University of the South Pacific, on the land that was formerly home to the RNZAF No. 5 Squadron.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

‘Medals’ Mark taking troughing far too far

This is truly weapons-grade troughing from Ron ‘Medals’ Mark:

National is accusing Defence Minister Ron Mark of misusing his position by using the Air Force as a taxi service and getting helicopter rides to his home in the Wairarapa.

Former Defence Minister and National defence spokesman Mark Mitchell says official information shows Air Force NH-90 helicopters and a B200 King Air aircraft have repeatedly been diverted to Mark’s home town, Masterton, “apparently to ferry the minister from his home to events around the country and back again.”

Mitchell said the flights were happening so often that locals were asking questions about it.  

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Four unanswered questions and one response

A few weeks ago I sent out a number of emails to a select group of politicians. They were, in no particular order: Phil Goff; Golriz Ghahraman; Julie Anne Genter; Trevor Mallard; and Grant Robertson.

In these emails, I asked some pretty basic and direct questions.

I have since received only one response.

 

To The Honourable Golriz Ghahraman I wrote:

Hi Golriz,

I just have a quick question regarding your recent attendance at the Anti-Bases protest over in Waihopai last weekend:

Did you use Crown expenses to travel to and from this event?

Thank you for your time in this matter.

 

As yet no response has been forthcoming.

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ORANGE

  • A large round juicy citrus fruit with a tough bright reddish-yellow rind.

AMBER

  • Hard translucent fossilized resin originating from extinct coniferous trees of the Tertiary period, typically yellowish in colour. It has been used in jewellery since antiquity.

ORINJAMBA

  • Fifth generation Kiwi, social-political writer who left the Left sometime back and turned right. Heavily reliant on spell check with hopefully the intelligence to admit when he’s wrong and the humility to see the truth, irrespective of where it’s found.

In Whose Name?

PHIL JOHNSON/STUFF CIRCUIT Harmeet Sooden

I count myself extremely fortunate to live in a country where it is not against the law to be an annoying idiot.

Perhaps the current level of liberty I myself hold would be somewhat compromised if this was not the case.

As a benefactor of the English Common Law, this nation enjoys a level of quiet moderation of jurisprudence that ensures a much more robust and transparent system of governance that few other countries possess. This is unfortunate but nevertheless a reality.

The evolutionary nature of our laws are measured against the balance of precedence which is not only better able to adapt to changing circumstance, but also far less reliant on a central power base deciding on how legislation is to be interpreted.

But with any system, there are always pros and cons and none are entirely perfect.

One such drawback I believe is the unfortunate magnetic quality such a system as ours has in attracting the most annoying self-righteous attention seekers God has ever put breath into. I mean, there are few places in the world where one can espouse an opinion however unpopular or controversial. My own presence on this Blog is a testament to that.

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ORANGE

  • A large round juicy citrus fruit with a tough bright reddish-yellow rind.

AMBER

  • Hard translucent fossilized resin originating from extinct coniferous trees of the Tertiary period, typically yellowish in colour. It has been used in jewellery since antiquity.

ORINJAMBA

  • Fifth generation Kiwi, social-political writer who left the Left sometime back and turned right. Heavily reliant on spell check with hopefully the intelligence to admit when he’s wrong and the humility to see the truth, irrespective of where it’s found.

Ex-Motor pool mechanic and now Defence Minister stupidly lax with medals

The ex-Motor pool mechanic and now Defence Minister, Ron Mark, has been made to look like a bit of a fool for wearing his medals incorrectly and in some cases without a permission.

In order to wear foreign medals you have to get permission. It appears Mark didn’t.

Defence minister Ron Mark has admitted wearing medals he did not have permission to wear.

He is now seeking permission to wear medals which have taken pride of place on his chest during the swearing in of Parliament and the commemorations for Armistice Day.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Beersheba celebration photos

Here are some photos from Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu’s Facebook page of celebrations at Beersheba.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

I can’t wait for the howls of outrage over Vector’s latest investment

Vector has invested $10M in the Israeli startup that developed the impressive Iron Dome software that protects Israel from terrorist rocket attacks.

Instead of shooting down Hamas rockets from Gaza, the Israeli software developer behind the Iron Dome missile defense system, mPrest, is teaming up with New Zealand’s largest power utility to prevent summertime blackouts and cut down on carbon emissions.

By connecting multiple smart devices in an “Internet of Energy” platform, mPrest’s partnership with New Zealand’s Vector LTD indicates how many Israeli hi-tech firms are branching out and adapting defense-contracted technology to civilian use.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

The Australian Defence Force are having a bad year

The Australian Defence Force is having a bad year. They were hacked and an investigation into the hack revealed that almost anybody could have penetrated their security thanks to a simple password fail.

On top of the hack, it has been revealed that despite having only 27 transgender Defence personnel in the entire Australian Defence Force they have spent well over a million dollars on 17 sex change operations and have written more than 70 documents since 2015 on how to deal with transgenders in the military.The documents include:

20 x Senate Estimates Brief
9 x Ministerial advice briefing notes
7 x Ministerial talking points
2 x Media releases
Service newspaper articles
A ‘Public Affairs Plan’
A ‘Communications Strategies’
A ‘Communications Plan’
A ‘Diversity Communication Strategy’
A response to Questions on Notice
2 x Quarterly Diversity and Inclusion Papers
3 x DEFGRAMs

In between all of that, Defence also managed to:

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If you agree with me that’s nice, but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo, look between the lines and do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

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