Defense

ANZACs and ‘human vultures’

When the men of the New Zealand Mounted Rifle Brigade received orders to mount up and move out en-masse, battle-ready, during the night of 29th September, 1918 there was none of the usual grumbling; they hated night ‘stunts’. This night they moved with real urgency, they had no idea exactly what situation they would be riding into, all they knew with certainty was their mates from across the ditch were in trouble and they were on their way to help the Aussies out. There was absolutely no doubt every single member of the New Zealand brigade would willingly risk his own life, do whatever it took, to support their Australian brothers-in-arms; no question asked.    Read more »

Living in Wellington idbkiwi is self-employed in a non-governmental role which suits his masochistic tendencies. He watches very little television, preferring to read or research, but still subscribes to the daily paper despite his distillation of dismay and disappointment at the very low standards of the modern press on every opening of the awful rag.

He is married, to an obviously very unfortunate woman, and has a family who allegedly loves him despite his right-wing nut-job views on life and the meaning of. He believes laughter is the best medicine for whatever ails you, closely, very closely, followed by wine. He hopes to reach retirement, both alive and eventually.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

The Battle of Long Tan

Editors note: Today is the anniversary of the Battle of Long Tan. My father in law, Skippy, fought in that battle, firstly calling in the artillery from his observer position and then manning the guns of 161 Bty to keep the Aussies alive. Orinjamba wrote this post earlier this year and it is now reposted in honour of those who died and those heroes who helped keep the survivors alive. Lest we forget.


Few other military engagements come closer to encapsulating the ANZAC spirit than the Battle of Long Tan which took place in August of 1966.

This battle has largely been forgotten by the general public due in no small measure to the unpopular nature of the war it occurred in. But the overwhelming odds which were eventually overcome in this engagement is testament to the long history of brotherhood and cooperation New Zealand and Australian forces have developed over the years.

I will not go into great detail regarding the breakdown of this battle here for there is not the time to do it justice however for a comprehensive analysis I would recommend “The Battle of Long Tan: As Told by the Commanders” written by Robert Grandin.

In short though, Long Tan has become somewhat of a byword in military circles as a good case study in the effective coordination of infantry, armour, artillery and aviation on the modern battlefield.

Read more »

ORANGE

  • A large round juicy citrus fruit with a tough bright reddish-yellow rind.

AMBER

  • Hard translucent fossilized resin originating from extinct coniferous trees of the Tertiary period, typically yellowish in colour. It has been used in jewellery since antiquity.

ORINJAMBA

  • Fifth generation Kiwi, social-political writer who left the Left sometime back and turned right. Heavily reliant on spell check with hopefully the intelligence to admit when he’s wrong and the humility to see the truth, irrespective of where it’s found.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

The social justice warriors have been demobbed

The US military machine, with some 1.2 million active servicemen and servicewomen, have decided that focussing on battlefield skills and training is probably a better use of their time and resources than focussing on dealing with transitioning the 0.1% transgender servicethings among them.  The Washington Times reports: Quote.

Fighting will now take precedence over dealing with transitioning transgender troops, drug abuse and other issues as the Army seeks to overhaul its training regimen to hone its soldiers’ battlefield skills.
Read more »

In solidarity with the those in the world’s most despised demographic, WH has decided to ‘come out’ as an old white male. WH enjoys exercising the white-male privilege that Whaleoil provides for him by writing the occasional post challenging climate change consensus; looking at random tech issues that tweak his interest, as a bit of a tech nerd; or generally poking the borax at anyone in public life who goes on record revealing their stupidity. WH never excelled on the sports field because his coaches never allowed him to play in his preferred position on the right-wing. WH also enjoys his MG.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

New planes for Defence Force to replace clapped out Orions?

It looks like the Air Force could be getting some brand new planes: Quote:

Defence Minister Ron Mark is one step closer to making the biggest defence procurements in recent years.

Mark will take his proposal to purchase up to four Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol planes from the United States to the Cabinet Government Administration and Expenditure Review Committee on Monday.

The planes, which would replace replace its retiring P-3 maritime patrol fleet, could cost up to US$1.4 billion (NZ$2.03 billion).This would be one of the most significant purchases, since the frigate upgrade.

However, the New Zealand Defence Force says the price is likely to be less than that.

Once the Cabinet committee had seen the proposal, it would have to go to Cabinet, before a decision on the purchase was made. There was no set date for the proposal to go to cabinet, but Mark said that was expected to happen before the end of July. End quote.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

The capture of Le Quesnoy

 

One of the more little-known actions that occurred during the Hundred Days Offensive of 1918 was the capture by New Zealand troops of the tiny French fortified village of Le Quesnoy.

The battle took place on the 4th of November, 1918 and the combatants had no idea that the ultimate end of the previous four years of bloodletting would finally be drawing near in a week’s time.

Beginning in the early hours, the New Zealand Rifle Brigade advanced from its starting position east of the town, aiming to surround it and link up on the far side. Once this had been achieved and the division proper had moved off, it was left to the Rifle Brigade to capture the village itself.

Read more »

ORANGE

  • A large round juicy citrus fruit with a tough bright reddish-yellow rind.

AMBER

  • Hard translucent fossilized resin originating from extinct coniferous trees of the Tertiary period, typically yellowish in colour. It has been used in jewellery since antiquity.

ORINJAMBA

  • Fifth generation Kiwi, social-political writer who left the Left sometime back and turned right. Heavily reliant on spell check with hopefully the intelligence to admit when he’s wrong and the humility to see the truth, irrespective of where it’s found.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

The Battle of Long Tan

ABC
Painting of Battle of Long Tan

 

Few other military engagements come closer to encapsulating the ANZAC spirit than the Battle of Long Tan which took place in August of 1966.

This battle has largely been forgotten by the general public due in no small measure to the unpopular nature of the war it occurred in. But the overwhelming odds which were eventually overcome in this engagement is testament to the long history of brotherhood and cooperation New Zealand and Australian forces have developed over the years.

I will not go into great detail regarding the breakdown of this battle here for there is not the time to do it justice however for a comprehensive analysis I would recommend “The Battle of Long Tan: As Told by the Commanders” written by Robert Grandin.

In short though, Long Tan has become somewhat of a byword in military circles as a good case study in the effective coordination of infantry, armour, artillery and aviation on the modern battlefield.

Read more »

ORANGE

  • A large round juicy citrus fruit with a tough bright reddish-yellow rind.

AMBER

  • Hard translucent fossilized resin originating from extinct coniferous trees of the Tertiary period, typically yellowish in colour. It has been used in jewellery since antiquity.

ORINJAMBA

  • Fifth generation Kiwi, social-political writer who left the Left sometime back and turned right. Heavily reliant on spell check with hopefully the intelligence to admit when he’s wrong and the humility to see the truth, irrespective of where it’s found.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Monument unveiled in Fiji for RNZAF flying boat veterans

Laucala Bay veterans and current RNZAF personnel in front of the monument

Regular readers know I was born in Fiji, and where we lived at Suva Point (Statham Street) was just around the corner from the old RNZAF flying boat base.

The NZDF reports on a new monument commemorating the Kiwi servicemen and women who served at Laucala Bay:

A commemorative monument has been unveiled in Fiji to recognise the service of veterans from the Royal New Zealand Air Force’s (RNZAF) flying boat operations, based at Laucala Bay in Suva, from 1941 to 1967.

RNZAF’s No. 5 Squadron conducted anti-submarine patrols, maritime reconnaissance and transport and air-sea rescue missions, flying Short Singapore, Consolidated Catalina and Short Sunderland aircraft.

The monument, designed and made in Fiji, was unveiled yesterday by Fiji Prime Minister Josaia Voreqe Bainimarama and New Zealand Defence Minister Ron Mark at the University of the South Pacific, on the land that was formerly home to the RNZAF No. 5 Squadron.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

‘Medals’ Mark taking troughing far too far

This is truly weapons-grade troughing from Ron ‘Medals’ Mark:

National is accusing Defence Minister Ron Mark of misusing his position by using the Air Force as a taxi service and getting helicopter rides to his home in the Wairarapa.

Former Defence Minister and National defence spokesman Mark Mitchell says official information shows Air Force NH-90 helicopters and a B200 King Air aircraft have repeatedly been diverted to Mark’s home town, Masterton, “apparently to ferry the minister from his home to events around the country and back again.”

Mitchell said the flights were happening so often that locals were asking questions about it.  

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Four unanswered questions and one response

A few weeks ago I sent out a number of emails to a select group of politicians. They were, in no particular order: Phil Goff; Golriz Ghahraman; Julie Anne Genter; Trevor Mallard; and Grant Robertson.

In these emails, I asked some pretty basic and direct questions.

I have since received only one response.

 

To The Honourable Golriz Ghahraman I wrote:

Hi Golriz,

I just have a quick question regarding your recent attendance at the Anti-Bases protest over in Waihopai last weekend:

Did you use Crown expenses to travel to and from this event?

Thank you for your time in this matter.

 

As yet no response has been forthcoming.

Read more »

ORANGE

  • A large round juicy citrus fruit with a tough bright reddish-yellow rind.

AMBER

  • Hard translucent fossilized resin originating from extinct coniferous trees of the Tertiary period, typically yellowish in colour. It has been used in jewellery since antiquity.

ORINJAMBA

  • Fifth generation Kiwi, social-political writer who left the Left sometime back and turned right. Heavily reliant on spell check with hopefully the intelligence to admit when he’s wrong and the humility to see the truth, irrespective of where it’s found.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

In Whose Name?

PHIL JOHNSON/STUFF CIRCUIT Harmeet Sooden

I count myself extremely fortunate to live in a country where it is not against the law to be an annoying idiot.

Perhaps the current level of liberty I myself hold would be somewhat compromised if this was not the case.

As a benefactor of the English Common Law, this nation enjoys a level of quiet moderation of jurisprudence that ensures a much more robust and transparent system of governance that few other countries possess. This is unfortunate but nevertheless a reality.

The evolutionary nature of our laws are measured against the balance of precedence which is not only better able to adapt to changing circumstance, but also far less reliant on a central power base deciding on how legislation is to be interpreted.

But with any system, there are always pros and cons and none are entirely perfect.

One such drawback I believe is the unfortunate magnetic quality such a system as ours has in attracting the most annoying self-righteous attention seekers God has ever put breath into. I mean, there are few places in the world where one can espouse an opinion however unpopular or controversial. My own presence on this Blog is a testament to that.

Read more »

ORANGE

  • A large round juicy citrus fruit with a tough bright reddish-yellow rind.

AMBER

  • Hard translucent fossilized resin originating from extinct coniferous trees of the Tertiary period, typically yellowish in colour. It has been used in jewellery since antiquity.

ORINJAMBA

  • Fifth generation Kiwi, social-political writer who left the Left sometime back and turned right. Heavily reliant on spell check with hopefully the intelligence to admit when he’s wrong and the humility to see the truth, irrespective of where it’s found.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.