General

The Battle of Long Tan

Editors note: Today is the anniversary of the Battle of Long Tan. My father in law, Skippy, fought in that battle, firstly calling in the artillery from his observer position and then manning the guns of 161 Bty to keep the Aussies alive. Orinjamba wrote this post earlier this year and it is now reposted in honour of those who died and those heroes who helped keep the survivors alive. Lest we forget.


Few other military engagements come closer to encapsulating the ANZAC spirit than the Battle of Long Tan which took place in August of 1966.

This battle has largely been forgotten by the general public due in no small measure to the unpopular nature of the war it occurred in. But the overwhelming odds which were eventually overcome in this engagement is testament to the long history of brotherhood and cooperation New Zealand and Australian forces have developed over the years.

I will not go into great detail regarding the breakdown of this battle here for there is not the time to do it justice however for a comprehensive analysis I would recommend “The Battle of Long Tan: As Told by the Commanders” written by Robert Grandin.

In short though, Long Tan has become somewhat of a byword in military circles as a good case study in the effective coordination of infantry, armour, artillery and aviation on the modern battlefield.

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ORANGE

  • A large round juicy citrus fruit with a tough bright reddish-yellow rind.

AMBER

  • Hard translucent fossilized resin originating from extinct coniferous trees of the Tertiary period, typically yellowish in colour. It has been used in jewellery since antiquity.

ORINJAMBA

  • Fifth generation Kiwi, social-political writer who left the Left sometime back and turned right. Heavily reliant on spell check with hopefully the intelligence to admit when he’s wrong and the humility to see the truth, irrespective of where it’s found.

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recalcitrant (adj) – 1. Stubbornly resistant to or defiant of authority or guidance.
2. Difficult to manage or deal with.
3. Resistant to chemical decomposition; decomposing extremely slowly.

(noun) – A recalcitrant person.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1823, from French récalcitrant, literally “kicking back” (17-18 century), past participle of recalcitrare “to kick back; be inaccessible,” from re- “back” + Latin calcitrare “to kick,” from calx (genitive calcis) “heel”. Used from 1797 as a French word in English.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

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punnet (noun) – (British, Australian) A small basket for fruit, such as strawberries.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : In the “Cyclops” episode (chapter 12) of Ulysses, there are 33 parodies in exaggerated, sentimental, or pompous styles. The first of these parodies begins “In Inisfail the fair,” a parody of a poem by the Irish poet James Mangin (1803-49), and contains, among other things, an extravagant list of Irish products: “… pearls of the earth, and punnets of mushrooms and custard marrows….”

A punnet is a light, shallow container for fruits or other produce. The word is used in Ireland, England, and Australia but not in America. Its origin is uncertain. Punnet entered English in the 19th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Results from recent study indicate below average functioning for MSM

Results from a recent study have shown that MSM journalists are…well…a bit thick really.

While these results aren’t in any way definitive they are indicative and, if objectively true, would explain quite a lot. Quote.

The results showed that journalists’ brains were operating at a lower level than the average population, particularly due to dehydration and their tendency to self-medicate with alcohol, caffeine, and high-sugar foods.

41% of the subjects said they drank 18 or more units of alcohol a week, which is four units above the recommended weekly allowance. Less than 5% of them drank enough water, and some admitted to drinking none at all. End Quote.

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ORANGE

  • A large round juicy citrus fruit with a tough bright reddish-yellow rind.

AMBER

  • Hard translucent fossilized resin originating from extinct coniferous trees of the Tertiary period, typically yellowish in colour. It has been used in jewellery since antiquity.

ORINJAMBA

  • Fifth generation Kiwi, social-political writer who left the Left sometime back and turned right. Heavily reliant on spell check with hopefully the intelligence to admit when he’s wrong and the humility to see the truth, irrespective of where it’s found.

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Word of the day

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névé ( (noun) – 1. The upper part of a glacier where the snow turns into ice.
2. (a) A snow field at the head of a glacier.
(b) The granular snow typically found in such a field.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Field of granular snow, firn,” 1843, from French névé (19th century), probably from Savoyard névi “mass of snow,” from Latin nivem (nominative nix) “snow” (source of French neige), from PIE root *sneigwh- “snow, to snow”.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

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leonine (adj) – 1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of a lion.
2. Resembling or suggestive of a lion, as in being powerful or dignified.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology :  The English adjective leonine comes from Latin leōnīnus, a derivative of the noun leō (inflectional stem leōn-), a borrowing from Greek léōn (inflectional stem léont-). Léōn is not a Greek word, but it does look somewhat like Hebrew lābhī; both the Greek and the Hebrew nouns may be borrowings from a third language. The Greek historian Herodotus (484?-425? b.c.) and the philosopher Aristotle (384-322 b.c.) both assert that lions were rare in Europe in their day but were still found. Leonine entered English in the 14th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.