General

Dead in a Month?

The Greens and their Labour enablers hate ‘fossil’ fuels and are keen to get them banned, to ‘save’ the planet. Such noble intentions.

I read a statement over the weekend that said:

Eliminate fossil fuels tomorrow and almost everyone in the developed world would be dead in about a month from starvation and exposure.

Now, there was no science to back this opinion but, on balance, it is probably not far off the mark.

Source

The graph is from BP and is the global picture of energy consumption by fuel source, converted to millions of tonnes of oil equivalent. The takeaway from that graph is the global share of renewables, which is a measly 4%.

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Confessions of an Evil E-bike Rider

Just when you thought it was safe to get back in the saddle, the ‘real’ road maggots are out to get you. If you ride an e-bike you are clearly not a ‘real’ cyclist and thus you should be shunned / banned / regulated / or something.

It all bubbled to the surface when a ‘real’ cyclist collided with an ‘a***hole’ on an e-bike when both were using a designated cycleway.

No one remembers exactly what happened but the ‘real’ cyclist is calling for a ‘crack-down’ on ‘a***holes’. (Sorry!)

A cyclist who was badly hurt in a collision with an electric bike is begging Auckland Transport to clarify rules around cycleways before someone is killed.

Dr Tony Hickey had a serious head-on crash with a man on an e-bike on May 14, while he was riding on the NorthWestern cycleway’s Rainbow Path next to Unitec in Mt Albert.

Hickey was knocked out, so he doesn’t remember much apart from riding down the hill and meeting a rider standing up in the saddle, biking uphill at speed. He understands the man was on the wrong side of the path and was on a motorised e-bike – although he can’t prove it.

Gadzooks – an e-bike with a motor! What will they think of next?

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Daily Crossword

Word of the Day

The word for today is…

footle (noun) – Nonsense; foolishness.

(verb) – 1. To waste time; trifle.
2. To talk nonsense.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Footle will be more familiar to speakers of British English than it is to speakers of American English. Its likely source is the seldom-used footer, meaning “to waste time.” That word is etymologically connected with fouter (also spelled foutra), a word referring to something of little value or someone worthless or bungling. But the link between footle and footer is speculative. What we can say with confidence is that footle is a verb of 19th century origin that—along with the derivative adjective footling (as in “a footling amateur”)—is still apt when discussing foolish or trifling people or things.

Daily crossword

Word of the day

The word for today is…

ephemeral (adj) – 1. Lasting for a markedly brief time.
2. Having a short lifespan or a short annual period of aboveground growth. Used especially of plants.

(noun) – Something, especially a plant, that is ephemeral.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The mayfly (order Ephemeroptera) typically hatches, matures, mates, and dies within the span of a few short hours (though the longest-lived may survive a record two days); poets sometimes use this insect to symbolize life’s ephemeral nature. When ephemeral (from the Greek word eph?meros, meaning “lasting a day”) first appeared in print in English in the late 16th century, it was a scientific term applied to short-term fevers, and later, to organisms (such as insects and flowers) with very short life spans. Soon after that, it acquired an extended sense referring to anything fleeting and short-lived, as in “ephemeral pleasures.”

Daily crossword

Word of the day

The word for today is…

disparage (verb) – 1. To speak of in a slighting or disrespectful way.
2. To reduce in esteem or rank.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : In Middle English, to “disparage” someone meant causing that person to marry someone of inferior rank. Disparage derives from the Anglo-French word desparager, meaning “to marry below one’s class.” Desparager, in turn, combines the negative prefix des- with parage (meaning “equality” or “lineage”), which itself comes from per, meaning “peer.” The original “marriage” sense of disparage is now obsolete, but a closely-related sense (meaning “to lower in rank or reputation”) survives in modern English. By the 16th century, English speakers (including William Shakespeare) were also using disparage to mean simply “to belittle.”

Daily crossword

Word of the day

The word for today is…

disbursement (noun) – 1. The act or process of disbursing.
2. Money paid out; expenditure.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Disbursement was minted in English in the late 16th century by melding the noun suffix -ment with the verb disburse. Disburse is a borrowing of the Middle French desbourser, which traces back to the Old French desborser, a combination of the negating prefix des- (equivalent to the English dis-) and borse, which, like its English cognate purse, ultimately traces back to the Medieval Latin bursa, meaning “money bag” and, in earlier Latin usage, “oxhide.” During the 16th and 17th centuries, deburse, depurse, and dispurse were deposited in the English language bank as synonyms of disburse. Deburse and depurse were also used respectively to form debursement and depursement—but these synonyms of disburse and disbursement all quickly declined in value and were never redeemed.

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