General

Word of the day

The word for today is…

doss (noun) – (Chiefly British Slang) 1. Sleep; rest.
2. A crude or makeshift bed.

(verb) – To go to bed, especially in a crude or makeshift bed; sleep.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The origin of the English verb doss is obscure. It is most likely derived from the Latin noun dossum, a variant of dorsum “the back (of the body),” a noun of unclear origin. The verb endorse comes from Medieval Latin indorsāre “to write on or sign the back of a document”; the adjective dorsal “having a back or located on the back” is most likely familiar as an anatomical term, especially referring to the fin of a shark or a dolphin. Doss entered English in the late 18th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Daily crossword

This is Subscriber Content.

You can access subscriber content, including crosswords, sudoku, polling, commentary and podcasts by subscribing to one of our membership packages.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

Disneyfication (noun) – 1. The establishment or alteration of business activity to conform with the goals or image of a corporation, especially in the elimination of controversial, sensitive, or potentially offensive activities or material.
2. The presentation of historical or cultural material in an expurgated or distorted fashion in an effort to appeal to a large number of tourists or consumers.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Disneyfy is an Americanism formed from the name of Walt Disney, the cartoonist and moviemaker (1901-66), and the familiar verb suffix -fy. Disneyfy entered English in the second half of the 20th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Daily crossword

This is Subscriber Content.

You can access subscriber content, including crosswords, sudoku, polling, commentary and podcasts by subscribing to one of our membership packages.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

congeries (noun) – A collection; an aggregation.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : English congeries comes directly from the Latin noun congeriēs “collection, pile, heap,” a derivative of the verb congerere “to collect, amass.” Congeries is a singular noun in Latin as it has always been in English. In the mid-19th century a new singular arose in English, congery, a back formation from congeries. Congeries entered English in the 17th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Daily crossword

This is Subscriber Content.

You can access subscriber content, including crosswords, sudoku, polling, commentary and podcasts by subscribing to one of our membership packages.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

concupiscent (noun) – A strong desire, especially sexual desire; lust.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Not many Latin words are as easy to break down into their component parts as concupiscent is. The first element is a variant of the preposition and prefix cum “with,” here used as an intensive prefix (“thoroughly”). The second element is the Latin root cup- “desire.” The third, -isc, is the inceptive (also called inchoative) suffix (“beginning to …”). The final element is -ent, the inflectional stem of the present participle; concupiscent literally means “beginning to strongly desire” or simply “desirous.” Concupiscent entered English in the 14th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Daily crossword

This is Subscriber Content.

You can access subscriber content, including crosswords, sudoku, polling, commentary and podcasts by subscribing to one of our membership packages.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

blamestorming (noun) – An intense discussion for the purposes of placing blame or assigning responsibility for a misdeed or failure.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Blamestorming was originally a colloquialism in American English, modeled on the much earlier (1907) brainstorming. Blamestorming entered English in the 1990s.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, two cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Daily crossword

This is Subscriber Content.

You can access subscriber content, including crosswords, sudoku, polling, commentary and podcasts by subscribing to one of our membership packages.