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Word of the day

The word for today is…

toyetic (adj) – (Marketing) (of a film or television programme) having the potential to generate consumer interest in associated merchandise, such as toys, computer games, etc.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Toyetic, an obvious composition of toy and the adjective suffix -etic, was supposedly coined by the American toy developer and marketer Bernard Loomis (1923–2006) in a conversation with Steven Spielberg about making figures based on Spielberg’s movie Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977).

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Daily crossword

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Word of the day

The word for today is…

tawdry (adj) – 1. Gaudy and cheap in nature or appearance.
2. Shameful or indecent

(noun) – Cheap and gaudy finery.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “No longer fresh or elegant but worn as if it were so; in cheap and ostentatious imitation of what is rich or costly,” 1670s, adjective use of noun tawdry “silk necktie for women” (1610s), shortened from tawdry lace (1540s), an alteration (with adhesion of the -t- from Saint) of St. Audrey’s lace, a necktie or ribbon sold at the annual fair at Ely on Oct. 17 commemorating St. Audrey (queen of Northumbria, died 679). Her association with lace necklaces is that she supposedly died of a throat tumor, which, according to Bede, she considered God’s punishment for her youthful stylishness:

“I know of a surety that I deservedly bear the weight of my trouble on my neck, for I remember that, when I was a young maiden, I bore on it the needless weight of necklaces; and therefore I believe the Divine goodness would have me endure the pain in my neck, that so I may be absolved from the guilt of my needless levity, having now, instead of gold and pearls, the fiery heat of a tumour rising on my neck.” [A.M. Sellar translation, 1907]

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Greens new road safety measures scuppered: By cyclists!

If you ever needed a lesson in just how pathetic your current rulers are, please allow me to regale you with the latest cluster-whatsit that has recently gone down in the Queenstown Lakes area.

You may recall your illustrious Green Associate Minister for Transport, Ms Julie Anne Genter complaining bitterly during her nine years of incompetence in opposition that blame for every single road death in New Zealand was to be laid firmly at the feet of the National Party, cause you know, nine years of neglect, blah, blah, blah.

Julie-Anne (none of these deaths are my fault) Genter. Green Minister for blaming other people.

You may also recall that she was very happy that some of those annoying Roads of National Significance were canned by the government that her and her fellow Greenies prop up. She is on record stating that there were much better ways to save lives rather than just building nice new straight roads with nothing on them to hit. Cheaper too.

One of her favourite new ways to stop the proletariat killing themselves in cars was, of course, to install heaps of barriers and rumble strips to stop people drifting off the road and falling into lakes or crashing into other proletariat driving towards them. Read more »

ExPFC, ex lots of things. Husband to a great woman. Father to great kids. Traveller, teller of tall tales, wannabe capitalist property magnate. I’m a passionate user of fossil fuels, a proud Kiwi, Ford over Holden, Indy over F1, V8’s over everything else.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Daily crossword

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Word of the day

The word for today is…

taradiddle (noun) – (Variant of tarradiddle.) 1. A petty falsehood; a fib.
2. Silly pretentious speech or writing; twaddle.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The true origin of taradiddle is unknown, but that doesn’t mean you won’t encounter a lot of balderdash about its history. Some folks try to connect it to the verb diddle (one meaning of which is “to swindle or cheat”), but that connection hasn’t been proven and may turn out to be poppycock. You may even hear some tommyrot about this particular sense of diddle coming from the Old English verb didrian, which meant “to deceive,” but that couldn’t be true unless didrian was somehow suddenly revived after eight or nine centuries of disuse. No one even knows when taradiddle was first used. It must have been before it showed up in a 1796 dictionary of colloquial speech (where it was defined as a synonym of fib), but if we claimed we knew who said it first, and when, we’d be dishing out pure applesauce.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Daily crossword

This is Subscriber Content.

You can access subscriber content, including crosswords, sudoku, polling, commentary and podcasts by subscribing to one of our membership packages.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

sibilate (verb) – 1. To utter or pronounce with a hissing sound.
2. To hiss.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Sibilate comes from Latin sībilātus, past participle of the verb sībilāre “to hiss, hiss in disapproval.” From sībilant-, the present participle stem of sībilāre, English has the noun and adjective sibilant, used in phonetics in reference to hissing sounds like s or z. Sibilate entered English in the 17th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Daily crossword

This is Subscriber Content.

You can access subscriber content, including crosswords, sudoku, polling, commentary and podcasts by subscribing to one of our membership packages.