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Word of the day

The word for today is…

lodestar (noun) – 1. A star, such as Polaris, that is used as a point of navigational reference.
2. A principle, interest, or person that serves as a guide.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Late 14th century (late 13th century as a surname), “a star that leads or serves to guide,” an old name for the pole star as the star that “leads the way” in navigation; from lode “a way, a course, something to be followed” (a Middle English variant spelling of load that preserved the original Old English sense of that noun) + star. Figurative use from late 14th century. Similar formation in Old Norse leiðarstjarna, German Leitstern, Danish ledestjerne.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Daily crossword

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You can access subscriber content, including crosswords, sudoku, polling, commentary and podcasts by subscribing to one of our membership packages.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

ingratiate (verb) – To bring (oneself, for example) into the favour or good graces of another, especially by deliberate effort.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 17th-century English speakers combined the Latin noun gratia, meaning “grace” or “favor,” with the English prefix in- to create the verb ingratiate. When you ingratiate yourself, you are putting yourself in someone’s good graces to gain their approval or favour. English words related to ingratiate include gratis and gratuity. Both of these reflect something done or given as a favor through the good graces of the giver.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Daily crossword

This is Subscriber Content.

You can access subscriber content, including crosswords, sudoku, polling, commentary and podcasts by subscribing to one of our membership packages.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

forbearance (noun) – 1. Tolerance and restraint in the face of provocation; patience.
2. (Law) The act of giving a debtor more time to pay rather than immediately enforcing a debt that is due.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1570s, originally legal, in reference to enforcement of debt obligations, from forbear + -ance. General sense of “a refraining from” is from 1590s.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Daily crossword

This is Subscriber Content.

You can access subscriber content, including crosswords, sudoku, polling, commentary and podcasts by subscribing to one of our membership packages.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

cyclopean (adj) – 1. (often Cyclopean) Relating to or suggestive of a Cyclops.
2. Very big; huge.
3. Of or constituting a primitive style of masonry characterised by the use of massive stones of irregular shape and size.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : English cyclopean comes from the Latin adjective Cyclōpēus, a borrowing of Greek Kyklṓpeios, a derivative of the common noun, proper noun, and name Kýklōps, which the Greeks interpreted to mean “round eye” (a compound of kýklos “wheel” and ōps “eye, face”). The most famous Cyclops is Polyphemus, a crude, solitary shepherd living on an island whom Odysseus blinded in Homer’s Odyssey. Hesiod (ca. 8th century b.c.) in his Theogony names three Cyclopes; they are craftsmen who make Zeus’s thunderbolts, and whom the Greeks often credited with building the walls of ancient Mycenae, Tiryns, Argos, and the acropolis of Athens, all constructed with massive limestone blocks roughly fitted together without mortar. Cyclopean entered English in the 17th century.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.

Daily crossword

This is Subscriber Content.

You can access subscriber content, including crosswords, sudoku, polling, commentary and podcasts by subscribing to one of our membership packages.

Word of the day

The word for today is…

copse (noun) – A thicket of small trees or shrubs.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : 1570s, “small wood grown for purposes of periodic cutting,” contraction of coppice.

Peter is a fourth-generation New Zealander, with his mother’s and father’s folks having arrived in New Zealand in the 1870s. He lives in Lower Hutt with his wife, three cats and assorted computers.

His work history has been in the timber, banking and real estate industries, and he’s now enjoying retirement. He has been interested in computers for over thirty years and is a strong advocate for free open source software. He is chairman of the SeniorNet Hutt City committee.