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Word of the day

The word for today is…

sippet (noun) – 1. A small piece of toast or bread soaked in gravy or other liquid or used as a garnish.

  1. A small bit; fragment.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The very uncommon noun sippet is a diminutive of sop “a piece of solid food, as bread, for dipping in liquid food” and the diminutive suffix -et, influenced by sip. Sippet entered English in the 16th century.

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Word of the day

The word for today is…

quirk (noun) – 1. A peculiarity of behaviour; an idiosyncrasy.

  1. An unpredictable or unaccountable act or event; a vagary.
  2. A sudden sharp turn or twist: a quirk of the head.
  3. (Architecture) A lengthwise groove on a molding between the convex upper part and the soffit.
  4. (Archaic) An equivocation; a quibble.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Did you expect quirk to be a noun meaning “a peculiarity of action or behaviour”? If so, you’re probably not alone; the “peculiarity” sense of the noun quirk is commonly known and has been a part of our language since the 17th century. But quirk has long worn other hats in English, too. The sense meaning “a curve, turn, or twist” has named everything from curving pen marks on paper (i.e., flourishes) to witty turns of phrase to the vagaries or twists of fate. In contemporary English, the verb quirk can be used in referring to facial expressions, especially those that involve crooked smiles or furrowed eyebrows.

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Word of the day

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noisome (adj) – 1. Offensive to the point of arousing disgust; foul.

  1. Harmful or dangerous.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : Noisome sounds like it might be a synonym of noisy, but it’s not. Something noisome is disgusting, offensive, or harmful, often in its smell. Noisome does not come from noise, but from the Middle English word noysome, which has the same meaning as noisome. Noysome was formed by combining the noun noy, which means “annoyance,” with the adjectival suffix -some (“characterized by a (specified) thing, quality, state, or action”). Noy comes from Anglo-French anui, which also means “annoyance.” As you may have already guessed, the English words annoy and annoyance are also related to noisome.

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Word of the day

The word for today is…

ignis fatuus (noun) – 1. A phosphorescent light that hovers or flits over swampy ground at night, possibly caused by spontaneous combustion of gases emitted by rotting organic matter. Also called friar’s lantern, jack-o’-lantern, will-o’-the-wisp, wisp.

  1. Something that misleads or deludes; an illusion.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Will o’ the wisp, jack-o-lantern,” 1560s, Medieval Latin, literally “foolish fire;” see igneous + fatuous. “It seems to have been formerly a common phenomenon; but is now exceedingly rare”.

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Word of the day

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dysphoria (noun) – An emotional state characterised by anxiety, depression, or unease.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : “Impatience under affliction,” 1842, from Greek dysphoria “pain hard to be borne, anguish,” etymologically “hard to bear,” from dys- “bad, hard” + pherein “to carry,” from PIE root *bher- “to carry.”