Health

William Hague says the war on drugs has failed and the UK should legalise cannabis now

William Hague, former leader of the Conservative party in the UK has written an opinion piece in The Telegraph about legalisation of cannabis. Quote:

The case of Billy Caldwell, the 12 year old with epilepsy whose vital cannabis oil medication was confiscated by Border Force officials to comply with UK drugs laws, provides one of those illuminating moments when a longstanding policy is revealed to be inappropriate, ineffective and utterly out of date.

That our border officials, with so much to deal with to prevent the smuggling of arms, people, wildlife and much else, should be expected to make off with a medicine that contains a tiny quantity of the psychoactive element in marijuana but had clear benefits for a boy with severe seizures, is beyond ridiculous. It suggests that official intransigence is now at odds with common sense.

Over the weekend, the Home Office sensibly backed down and returned Billy’s medicine. By doing so, it implicitly conceded that the law has become indefensible. It must now be asked whether Britain should join the many other countries that permit medical-grade marijuana, or indeed join Canada in preparing for a lawful, regulated market in cannabis for recreational use as well. End quote.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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Hosking on union strife under Labour

The nurses appear set to strike, the teachers are getting stroppy and the PSA is muscling up. Looks like the winter of discontent is coming from the civil servants not business.

Mind you business isn’t happy either. Mike Hosking says that strikes achieve nothing and drag us back to the 70s: Quote.

Looks like we are heading for a winter of discontent.

Nurses, IRD, MBIE, Burger King, Events Cinema, teachers, principals – have I missed anyone yet?

Thousands upon thousands are currently spending their hard earned time and energy working out whether they want to take some form of industrial action. It has been many a year since we have seen this sort of pending disruption in our workforce.   

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Nothing says Labour-led like stroppy, striking unions

The unions are playing up for their new master like there is no tomorrow.

The nurses’ union has rejected their pay offer and now the PSA is talking wider action in the public sector: Quote:

The nurses union has “strongly rejected” a district health board pay and conditions offer and is seeking urgent mediation to stave off nationwide strikes.

But the Government says it is “preparing for the worst” because there is no more money to offer. 

On Monday, Health Minister David Clark poured cold water on nurses’ hopes of gaining much more on a pay deal that was doubled on the one prior. The latest deal was more than what was recommended by an independent panel set up to try and navigate through an apparent impasse between the unions and district health boards (DHBs).

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

David Clark in more trouble

The arrogance of various Labour ministers hasn’t taken long to take hold of them. Normally this level of hubris comes after about seven years in government.

Labour ministers have had it from day one and it is showing in the screw-ups they are making.

Jami-Lee Ross has got the wood on David Clark and it’s now death by a thousand cuts: Quote:

Health Minister David Clark apologised to the former chairman of Counties Manukau District Health Board for the position he’d been left in over Middlemore Hospital’s building problems, correspondence from the ex-chairman claims.

The Herald has obtained text messages and an email which reveal former acting district health board chairman Rabin Rabindran’s increasing concern over public comments from Clark about what he was told about the state of the buildings at Middlemore and how the announcement of Rabindran’s departure from the board was handled.

Clark has previously said he was not told of the extent of problems at Middlemore Hospital when he visited on March 13 but Rabindran said he had been told verbally, and in documents handed to him at the time.

National MP Jami-Lee Ross says the correspondence shows Clark ignored Rabindran’s pleas to set the record straight. End quote.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Health lobbyists attack a private company for daring to recruit someone to oppose them

Rust never sleeps and neither do health lobbyists, who are outraged that a private company is recruiting someone for a position in the company to oppose health lobbyists and their unquenched desire to destroy businesses: Quote:

A recruitment drive by Coca-Cola to combat the threat of sugar taxes has been slammed as “appalling” by the New Zealand Dental Association.

A Coca-Cola South Pacific advertisement on LinkedIn for a public affairs and communications manager role promises “an opportunity to make a difference in the world” working for the global drinks giant.

The successful applicant, who will work from Auckland, will manage government relationships in the Pacific Islands to ensure sugar taxes don’t negatively impact the business, the job ad says.

A Coca-Cola spokesman says it does not support sugary drink taxes as they are “ineffective as a means of combating obesity”.

However, that’s contrary to findings reached by an international cohort of experts who have published a new paper in peer-reviewed medical journal The Lancet, highlighting “compelling evidence” that sugar taxes help improve health outcomes. End quote.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Face of the day

Supplied Talei Morrison, a cervical cancer sufferer sparked a campaign to make sure no one goes through what she went through.

A funeral for Smear Your Mea founder Talei Morrison will be held on Wednesday in Rotorua.

Morrison, who was also a kapa haka star, lost her very public battle with cervical cancer at 10.30am on Saturday, in a Hamilton hospice facility.[…]

Morrison was 42 when she was diagnosed with stage four cervical cancer in August last year.

Morrison spoke earlier this year about the Smear Your Mea campaign she initiated, urging women to go for the commonly dreaded smear test.

“Mea in Māori means thing, the thing that we’re talking about is obviously female genitalia. So we’re telling women to Smear Your Mea. And it’s catchy.”

Regular smears can reduce the risk of cervical cancer by 90 per cent, according to the Ministry of Health.[…]

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A contribution from Whaleoil staff and interns.

Senior criminology lecturer says ‘free the weed’

 

Dr Fiona Hutton, a senior lecturer in criminology, talks some sense on drug-law reformQuote:

QuoI started 2018 with an unmistakable sense of optimism – after years of procrastinating and avoiding the evidence, a government was going to hold a referendum on legalising cannabis by 2020.

Could this be the beginning of an exciting new era of drug policy and drug law reform? Where policy was evidence based, where the harms from drug use could be effectively addressed, and where the damage from criminalisation could be stopped?

[…]My biggest fear is that the whole thing will end up being a rushed, misinformed, ill-thought-through debacle, and we will have missed a really important chance to make a difference; to respond to drug use and drug users differently and more effectively; to stop the harms related to underground markets and criminalisation. Prohibition of drugs has not stopped people using or having problems with them.

[…]I hope the powers that be will take action very soon to provide a balanced, well-produced, well-thought-out information campaign, to ensure New Zealanders are fully aware of what they are voting for.End of quote.

What will happen is that those for reform will provide reasoned, evidence-based arguments while those opposed will engage in lies, misinformation and emotion. This is because those opposed to reform have got nothing. Quote.

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Libertarian and pragmatic anarchist. Treat everything the media says as a lie and know the narrative. Facts trump rhetoric.

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Labour’s inept ministers continue to be exposed, this time it is gagging people and buying silence

Labour’s inept ministers continue to be exposed, this time it is gagging people and buying silence from critics by offering them jobs if they shut up: Quote:

Newshub has obtained a voicemail and emails which suggest the Health Minister tried to gag senior staff talking publicly about the state of embattled Middlemore Hospital.

In one case he even appeared to promise a board member, who he’d sacked, another job if they shut up.

“I notice more and more getting reported that is really not helping at all, and I’m hopeful that there won’t be much more commentary,” Health Minister David Clark said in a voicemail to District Health Board chair Rabin Rabindran.

“My fear is that if you and I keep commenting, the story keeps ticking along. I’d rather not have distraction about who said what when.

However Mr Clark denies this, saying he was “absolutely not” trying to stop board members from speaking out. End quote.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

No surprise here: politicians rarely get such laws right

There are no surprises that the law changes touted at taming binge-drinking have largely failed: Quote:

The Massey University study showed apart from a slight reduction in bars’ opening hours, not much had changed under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act.

Lead researcher Stephen Randerson said restricting alcohol displays to a single area in supermarkets, banning discounts of more than 25 percent and allowing district councils to create their own alcohol policies had no discernible impact on problem drinking.

“If you really want to make a difference to alcohol-related harm, there’s really strong evidence that you need to just restrict the availability a little bit more, and address the cheapest alcohol and do something about the really high levels of marketing that are all around us.”

Almost every attempt by councils to restrict alcohol sales had faced legal challenges by the liquor industry – and been watered down or abandoned completely in some cases, he said.  End quote.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Cry baby of the week

This has got to be the one of the all time cry baby of the week awards.

Jimmy McCrillis, or as I like to call him Mr Scratch, thinks he should be seen first before others at the emergency department because he had a little bit of blood from some tiny widdle cuts: Quote:

A bleeding man had to wait nearly four hours to be seen at a public emergency ward in West Auckland.

Jimmy McCrillis​ said patients who did not appear to be seriously hurt packed Waitākere Hospital on the afternoon of Sunday, May 27, when he turned up after a nasty fall while running.

Of those in the waiting room, one man had back pain and three children looked sick – one maybe with a broken leg, he said.

But most of them “appeared to be quite healthy”.

“None of them were openly bleeding or obviously ill or in pain like I was.” End quote. 

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post: