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Incite Politics

Kiwis just put their money where their mouths are

The response to the brand new NZ Coalition for Free Speech asking for donations to bring judicial proceedings against Auckland Council for denying Stefan Molyneux and Lauren Southern a tax-funded venue to speak in has been surprisingly heartening!  The required 50k was raised in 24 hours.

What this shows is how ready Kiwis are to literally put their money where their mouths are. 

Almost nothing is as important as the law of free expression in our nation, for on it hangs all our other freedoms.  Free speech and free thought are inextricably bound;  to censor speech legally by making . . .

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Incite Politics

Evidence-based campaigning & the failure of TOP and Gareth Morgan

On the question of “Evidence Based Campaigning” Gareth had no credible answer. He said something about it was his money so he wanted value for money, then proceeded to depart from the question and make all sorts of excuses for making up campaigning as he went along.

I had a chat to one of Gareth’s offsiders who recognised Gareth had not answered my question. I explained that campaigning is a multibillion dollar industry in the United States, and thoroughly researched so nothing needs to be made up. The response was “We have spent hundreds of thousands on campaign experts . . .

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Incite Politics

Bob Jones: ‘This dire duo should be flogged and certainly have no place in journalism’

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Incite Politics

How do the right win?

Think about how Trump won. Did he set out to mobilise the classical Republican voter? Was he seeking the support of the small town-lawyer in Kansas? Or the local Walmart manager in Idaho? Yes, of course he was. Simply by being the Republican Party candidate he was more-or-less obliged to solicit their support. But, in terms of his down-to-the-wire campaign strategy none of those rock-ribbed Republicans really counted. He already had their votes. They were in the bag.

Elections are not won with the votes you already have. You win by attracting the . . .

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Incite Politics

Review: ‘Yes We (Still) Can’ by Dan Pfeiffer

The Decade of Obama (2007-2017) was one of massive change that rewrote the rules of politics in ways we are only now beginning to understand (which is why we all got 2016 wrong). Yes We (Still) Can looks at how Obama navigated the forces that allowed Trump to win the White House to become one of the most consequential presidents in American history, and how those on the left can come out on top, both in the US and globally . . .

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Incite Politics

Victor Hugo: the soul of politics

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Simon Bridges’ question time problem

Another issue he has is that he is slowly eroding his support in caucus, slowly but surely, by hogging a great deal of the supplementary questions.

Day after day in the house he rises and asks the same or similar primary questions of firstly Jacinda Ardern and recently of Winston Peters.

He affects a strange inflection in his voice and haltingly tries to show gravitas that he doesn't possess. Then proceeds to waste question after question, traversing numerous topics and often straying into the areas other opposition spokes people are doing a great job in . . .

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Incite Politics

Lusk: Bridges needs mending

I went along to see Simon Bridges speak to a public meeting in Hastings last Friday. He performed adequately, but showed some relatively major flaws that were frustrating to watch. His message was relatively tight, even though it was not a real call to action. His message was masked by a wall of noise where he used far to many words to get across relatively simple points.

The feeling I got from the meeting was that Bridges has failed to use his nine years in parliament to prepare properly for being leader. He has not taken the time to work . . .

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Incite Politics

Bob Jones: Uphill skiing and wonky geography skills

God knows why but on Monday this week The Herald devoted the whole of page 3 to describing a tiny Canterbury husband and wife ski manufacturing outfit. The principal, Alex Herbert, asked what his company does, gave two memorable answers.

First, he said, “Kingswood Ski is a ski company”. Well bugger me! Who would have ever guessed it . . .

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Incite Politics

Will Justice Kennedy’s resignation precipitate a second American civil war?

The resignation of Justice Anthony Kennedy from the United States Supreme Court raises the awful possibility of a second American civil war. It is difficult to overstate the seriousness of such a disastrous turn of events. Were the world’s wealthiest nation to become embroiled in a fratricidal conflict on the scale of 1861-65, the global economy – already fragile – would simply collapse. The power vacuum created by the United States turning against itself would dangerously destabilise the entire world . . .

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