Law

Why do lefties need to lie about Three Strikes?

Last  week I caught up with an old friend – I will call him Porky. For 35 years Porky and I have agreed to disagree on whether he has for all those  years been a  proud foundation member of a “motorcycle club” or a gang. Either way he is one of those “good jokers” that one meets in the working class world, a reminder of something the lefties just don’t get – that  someone can have little formal education, but still be very smart.

Having not seen each other for a long time, our conversation naturally turned to my short political career and its spectacular flame out. Porky was well aware of my connection with the three strikes law but asked me to spell out its details for him. After I had done so, this proud long term member of a “motorcycle club” said “Well, there’s fuck all wrong with that law…if they are dumb enough to keep committing those kind of offences, prison is where they belong. If they can’t learn after three they are not going to”.    Read more »

Battling Lawfare*

The earlier post regarding the current proceedings that Cam is involved in has been ordered down by the court. Read more »

A contribution from Whaleoil staff and interns.

Now they’re coming for your supermarket beer

beer and barbeque

A newspaper reports on the latest wowser study:

Quote:
The study, released today, showed that around one in 14 ED attendances presented immediately after alcohol consumption or as a short-term effect of drinking and that rate had remained the same over a four-year period.

[…]Data for the study was collected in two waves – the first was in 2013, when legislation that gave local councils greater power to restrict the sale of alcohol had not come into affect, and the second in 2017 when the law changes were in place.

In 2017, about 25 per cent of those alcohol-related admissions had consumed more than 15 standard drinks before admission to ED and 18 per cent had consumed more than 20 drinks.

Head researcher James Foulds said that showed that the people who were presenting for alcohol-related reasons were consuming a very high amount.End of quote.

Wow, no shit Sherlock. Quote:

Quote:New laws introduced to curb alcohol harm have failed to make a dent on ED admissions, new research has found.

“And you’d think these were people stumbling out of bars at 2am in the morning but the majority had actually bought alcohol from a liquor store or supermarket and were drinking at a private location,” he said.

The Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 allowed local councils the right to adopt their own alcohol policies, which could cover anything from the number and location of licenced premises to trading hours and one-way door restrictions.

[…]But Alcohol Health Watch executive director Dr Nicki Jackson said those laws didn’t include any evidence-based measures that the law commissioner recommended.

“We’ve seen alcohol become more affordable than ever before and we are paying the cost for that in our emergency departments,” Jackson said.

[…]”What we have seen is a shift away from on-licensed liquor to cheap liquor available at off-licensed premises.End of quote.

ie. Supermarkets. Quote:

“The difference off-licence and on-license prices is now huge and putting alcohol next to bread and milk normalises the product.”End of quote.

Shocking. They’ll be putting gut-rot whisky in the candy aisle next. Quote:

Quote:
Christchurch Hospital ED senior doctor Scott Pearson said the study was very accurate to what he was seeing every day at work.

“We still see quite a lot of alcohol affected individuals that are predominantly after hours and that hasn’t changed in the last five years.”

He said the ED had had more than 5,000 alcohol-related admissions a year and more lately that’s been in addition to synthetic cannabis.

[…]Health Minister David Clark said it was “disturbing but unsurprising” there had been no reduction in alcohol-related presentations at emergency departments.

“New Zealand continues to face significant challenges with alcohol,” he said.End of quote.

Make no mistake. This is a veiled push to get grog out of the supermarkets and from one perspective they’re right. Stopping supermarket sales will mean fewer drunk idiots boozing it up too much at home and having their mates have to call the paramedics.

But here’s the thing. Statistics are meaningless without context. 5000 may sound a lot but the emergency department rate for alcohol is very low, something like 1 to 2% from memory. Putting it in context that’s seven times lower than cannabis. The only other drug that has as low emergency department rate is MDMA (but believe me, that’s another story).

This means that sure, they can take alcohol out of supermarkets but by far the people who will be hurt are responsible drinkers, which is, well, most of us.

Instead of focusing on sales what the government needs to do is focus on the idiots who drink too much and make a pain out of themselves. Where possible get them to pay for any medical treatment if they don’t already. Lump them with heavy fines and even a bit of cell time to let them know it’s not just a hangover they’re going to have to face the next day.

Basically, the wowsers want you to see alcohol abuse as a health issue. It’s not. Calling it a health issue gives those that drink too much a get-out-of-jail-free card. What it is is a behaviour-issue and we need to start making those that behave badly when it comes to alcohol pay for their bad behaviour.

Libertarian and pragmatic anarchist. Treat everything the media says as a lie and know the narrative. Facts trump rhetoric.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Tagged:

I stand opposed to the End of Life Choice Bill

Fakalofa Atu,

I stand opposed to the End of Life Choice Bill.

The bill that has been proposed threatens to further destabilise the meaning of life within our society, that most precious and societally basic idea that being alive is a gift and honour, and the inherent value that brings to self and the community.

We live in a society where we have traditionally fought, often with the blood of our people, to save and uphold the value of life, in order that the very right to exist is upheld.

And we now find ourselves experiencing an assault on the very preciousness of life, in the form of a law designed to increase the marketing of suicide.

Read more »

Deputy Leader of the New Conservative party, Elliot Ikilei is a husband and father who has worked in both personal and professional life as a youth worker for over 15 years. Through such experiences in work and personal life, he made a decision to devote his life to the protection of the family as the cornerstone of society. He staunchly defends freedom of speech that provides the foundation of all our freedoms.

Just legalise and regulate the real thing before someone innocent dies

On the 24th of September of this year a report was released that has the potential to save millions of lives, free millions more from virtual slavery, and deal a crushing blow to organised crime and gangs.

Yet the media completely ignored it.

The report was by the Global Commission on Drug Policy and is about the legal regulation of the currently illegal drug market.

Let’s start with some basic facts.

Prohibition has done nothing to curb drug misuse. In fact it has pushed the potency of illegal drugs to ever increasing levels, with synthetic cannabis being only the latest example. quote.

Quote:There is no guarantee some of those affected by a bad batch of synthetic cannabis will survive, a doctor says.End of quote.

This is called the iron law of Prohibition. The harder the enforcement, the harder the drugs.

Read more »

Libertarian and pragmatic anarchist. Treat everything the media says as a lie and know the narrative. Facts trump rhetoric.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

You can’t get a harsher penalty than a death sentence

Apparently harsher penalties will stop people from texting while driving: Quote:

It was two days before Christmas and Eliot Jessep was waiting for his mum to arrive home. A cop showed up instead.

Eliot’s mother, Paula, was dead. Police later revealed she was texting before her car crossed the centre line and hit an oncoming vehicle, leaving three young women trapped and injured.

Her death, Coroner Wallace Bain said, showed the dangers of texting behind the wheel – she sent 19 messages in the 45 minutes leading up to the head-on crash.

Seven years since his mum was killed north of Tirau, Eliot Jessep says punishments for the crime remain too light.

Being caught texting and driving will cost you $80 and 20 demerit points. That could be about to change. End quote.

What does he think would have stopped his mother from texting while driving? You can’t get much harsher than a death sentence. Quote:

Acting Associate Transport Minister James Shaw told Stuff he had ordered transport officials to investigate the effectiveness of harsher overseas penalties.

“This includes the use of safety cameras and other technologies, and higher penalties for distracted drivers,” Shaw said.

“I expect officials to consider whether the penalty for cell phone use is proportionate to similar offences and the risk posed.”

Late last year, the Ministry of Transport said it had no plans to increase the penalties.

The move to look into changes follows comments by Auckland Transport (AT) chairman Lester Levy last week that New Zealand had been “incredibly light” on enforcement.

“In London, for example, they have cameras looking for texters and if you get caught you get half of your demerit points … so that’s a pretty high sanction,” he said.

“Not everything can be stick, but when you speak to the people who were really critical in the VisionZero introduction in Sweden they did say that in the initial phases you may need more enforcement than you might have later.

“So it cannot be carrot only – there does need to be stick, and that’s probably an area where in New Zealand we’ve been incredibly light.”

Currently, the fine in Australia is A$400, while in Canada it is generally C$490. End quote.

And yet people still do it. Increased fines won’t stop anyone doing it. If they aren’t convinced it is a stupid thing to do while driving because of the risk to their own life then nothing will stop them doing it.

You can’t stop stupid. This is just Darwinism in action.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Great. Now 11 year olds are smoking the stuff


A left-wing newspaper reports on 11-year-olds doing synthetics. quote.

Quote:Children as young as 11 are getting hooked on synthetic cannabis in a Napier suburb known for being a popular source of the drug.End of quote.

11 years old. How the Nicky Hager did we get here?

Before I answer that I’d like to start by clearing one thing up. Synthetic cannabis isn’t just a label. Synthetic cannabis is synthetic cannabis. It works on the brain the same way as normal cannabis. It just can be more potent. Some of it, a lot more potent.

So how did we get here? Let’s start with the closest link. The fact that there are pushers selling drugs to kids. If I had my way there’d be a special place in Dante’s hell for scumbags who push illegal drugs and there’d be a special place in that place for those scumbags who push drugs to kids.

Thing is, under the law, there’s no difference between pushing drugs to adults and pushing drugs to kids. Same max penalty. That’s outrageous. Whether you’re a pothead or someone who thinks caffeine should be illegal you have to agree with that.

Read more »

Libertarian and pragmatic anarchist. Treat everything the media says as a lie and know the narrative. Facts trump rhetoric.

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Complaint laid against Meka the Muss by Graham McCready

Convicted tax cheat, blackmailer and serial litigant, Graham McCready has decided to make a pest of himself again by laying a complaint with police about Meka the Muss: Quote:

Serial litigant Graham McCready has filed a formal complaint of assault with police relating to the issues which led to Labour MP Meka Whaitiri being stood down as a minister.

In documents emailed to media and police today, McCready told police if it didn’t investigate then he would take a private prosecution “against the Hon Meka Whaitiri without further delay or notice”.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Damien Grant explores why we need more prisons, not less

Damien Grant explores why we need more prisons, not less: Quote:

It is hard to go to prison in New Zealand. It took me several attempts but I was finally successful and enjoyed a delightful time touring our penal archipelago in my twenties. Sadly, despite this hands-on insight into the criminal mind, I was not invited to the Justice Summit held in Porirua.

From the media reports over-representation of Māori in custody was a major focus. There are many reasons given for this. Colonialism. Racism. Poverty. The lack of free-to-air Rugby.

A wise person will look beyond race and seek a better explanation. Thankfully we have the dedicated researcher Lindsay Mitchell who has done just that. In a report for Family First published earlier this year she pulls no punches: “A sharp increase in unmarried births during the 1960s correlates markedly with a later rise in the imprisonment rate. Ex-nuptial births made up 79 percent of total Māori births in 2017. For non-Māori, the corresponding figure was 34 percent.” End quote.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Comment of the day

MaryLou raises some good points:

I like Chris Trotter. I really do. I find him insightful, an incredible resource of NZ political history, which in turn means a fantastic resource for the success and failures of policies implemented by governments both left and right over a long time. This latest article though, gives some insight as to where the divergence occurs between people of goodwill. Quote:

“….the inescapable reality of “Middle New Zealand’s” veto: it’s indisputable power and its implacable determination to have the final say.

That power was on full display in the opening hours of the Summit when Jayne Crothall, whose three year old daughter, Brittany, was murdered as she slept in 1997, was reported as breaking down in tears when a Maori woman claimed Pakeha did not know what it was like to be victimised.”

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.