Law

William Hague says the war on drugs has failed and the UK should legalise cannabis now

William Hague, former leader of the Conservative party in the UK has written an opinion piece in The Telegraph about legalisation of cannabis. Quote:

The case of Billy Caldwell, the 12 year old with epilepsy whose vital cannabis oil medication was confiscated by Border Force officials to comply with UK drugs laws, provides one of those illuminating moments when a longstanding policy is revealed to be inappropriate, ineffective and utterly out of date.

That our border officials, with so much to deal with to prevent the smuggling of arms, people, wildlife and much else, should be expected to make off with a medicine that contains a tiny quantity of the psychoactive element in marijuana but had clear benefits for a boy with severe seizures, is beyond ridiculous. It suggests that official intransigence is now at odds with common sense.

Over the weekend, the Home Office sensibly backed down and returned Billy’s medicine. By doing so, it implicitly conceded that the law has become indefensible. It must now be asked whether Britain should join the many other countries that permit medical-grade marijuana, or indeed join Canada in preparing for a lawful, regulated market in cannabis for recreational use as well. End quote.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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‘Catch and release’ well under way now

Labour’s ‘catch and release’ is well under way now, except they aren’t even bothering with the ‘catch’ part anymore: Quote:

The National Party has expressed shock after the government ditched two of its key police policies – and it is calling for them to be reinstated.

The then National government last year announced an aim of attending 98 percent of burglaries in 48 hours. It also set a target of having 95 percent of the population living within 25 kilometres of an all-hours police station.

The Labour government dropped both targets, although the police said they would continue to measure and report on their burglary attendance rate.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

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Senior criminology lecturer says ‘free the weed’

 

Dr Fiona Hutton, a senior lecturer in criminology, talks some sense on drug-law reformQuote:

QuoI started 2018 with an unmistakable sense of optimism – after years of procrastinating and avoiding the evidence, a government was going to hold a referendum on legalising cannabis by 2020.

Could this be the beginning of an exciting new era of drug policy and drug law reform? Where policy was evidence based, where the harms from drug use could be effectively addressed, and where the damage from criminalisation could be stopped?

[…]My biggest fear is that the whole thing will end up being a rushed, misinformed, ill-thought-through debacle, and we will have missed a really important chance to make a difference; to respond to drug use and drug users differently and more effectively; to stop the harms related to underground markets and criminalisation. Prohibition of drugs has not stopped people using or having problems with them.

[…]I hope the powers that be will take action very soon to provide a balanced, well-produced, well-thought-out information campaign, to ensure New Zealanders are fully aware of what they are voting for.End of quote.

What will happen is that those for reform will provide reasoned, evidence-based arguments while those opposed will engage in lies, misinformation and emotion. This is because those opposed to reform have got nothing. Quote.

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Libertarian and pragmatic anarchist. Treat everything the media says as a lie and know the narrative. Facts trump rhetoric.

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Actually Andrew, that is precisely what Kiwi voters want

Andrew Little is valiantly trying to convince voters that his “catch-and-release” policy for criminal justice reform is needed. Quote:

Andrew Little has initiated a review of bail, sentencing and parole laws, and better rehabilitation of prisoners.

Mr Little told Newshub Nation that the policy followed over the past 30 years could not continue.

On the current trajectory on prison populational growth, if we did nothing we would be building an extra prison every two to three years. That’s how bad it is.End quote. 

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Kelvin Davis: One option for prisons is “mattresses on the floor”

Labour has announced that they intend to scrap National’s plans for a larger prison at Waikeria and intends instead to build a 600 bed prison at Waikeria: Quote:

The Government will build a new 500-bed facility at Waikeria to help relieve pressure on the bursting prison system.

There would also be a further 100 beds in what Corrections Minister Kelvin Davis is calling a “first-of-its-kind” mental health facility.

The 600-bed prison was due to be completed by early 2022 and was expected to cost about $750 million.

And half of all cells at the new facility will be double-bunked, meaning two-thirds of prisoners will share a cella practice Labour and the Greens have been critical of in the past.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Tone deaf Little admits he still hasn’t spoken to NZ First

Andrew Little is insisting he is going to repeal ‘three strikes’, despite having his arse handed to him by Winston Peters: Quote:

Three strikes will be passed, if you ask the Justice Minister.

Andrew Little says he doesn’t believe that New Zealand First will vote to oppose the three strikes legislation in its caucus today.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Hosking on Winston’s clever strike against Little

Mike Hosking must have been choking back a bit of sick in praising Winston Peters in his NZ Herald column. Quote:

It’s on days like yesterday I honestly believe that under different circumstances, and with a different temperament, New Zealand First could actually have been a significant political force for good.

What they did in killing Labour’s three strikes law repeal is being the party that MMP cries out for.

A sensible, middle of the road, ballast against the madness and extremities that some parties are capable of, even if that party in this case was a mainstream so-called middle of the road operation.

Repealing three strikes was pure madness, it misread the problem, it completely misread the public view and it was hopelessly wanting in terms of an answer.

People would have died because of it.

Having fewer people in prison, having a more lenient approach to people being punished for crime, giving bad people the benefit of the doubt more often would have, as sure as night follows day, have led in some way shape or form to carnage among innocents who never deserved it.

We could see it, thank the good lord New Zealand First could see it, and they were able to do something about it.

The real danger of the Labour Party was on show in this thinking – they are obsessed, if not blinded, by hand-wringing ideology. It’s applicable to KiwiBuild, which will never see the light of day. End quote.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Wrong response Simon, wrong response

Simon Bridges has responded to Winston Peters’ legal case against those who he believes breached his privacy: Quote:

The National Party has hit out at New Zealand First leader Winson Peters’ lawsuit against two top public servants, saying he’s putting personal vendettas ahead of the country.

[…]

National Party leader Simon Bridges said it was a strange and misguided move from Mr Peters.

“His very first act is to sue his own government and the most senior civil servant in the land,” he said.

“He should be focused on doing a good job for New Zealanders, not on his own personal vendettas.” End quote.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

NZ First ain’t going to budge on ‘three strikes’

Andrew Little was putting on a brave face yesterday, suggesting that NZ First might consider reform of ‘three strikes’ as part of a total justice reform package.

That apparently isn’ the case and Little’s twinkle-toed dancing around the issue in an attempt to save face isn’t helping him. Quote:

NZ First is expected to make it clear it won’t support a three strikes repeal being considered as part of any wider justice reform after caucus meets on Tuesday.

Justice Minister Andrew Little was forced to backtrack on the proposed repeal that he was planning to take to Cabinet on Monday after NZ First indicated it wouldn’t support it.

In a press conference on Monday morning Little tried to leave the door open on three strikes being repealed in the future, saying NZ First didn’t support a “piecemeal” approach and wanted to see the total justice reform package.

However, it’s understood NZ First MPs have been working on this issue for weeks. The caucus has no plans to budge on its long-held view of being tough on law and order after seeking feedback from its voter base.    

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post:

Tracy Watkins talks about Andrew Little’s humiliation

Tracy Watkins explores Andrew Little’s humiliation. Quote:

Wrestling with alligators is how one National MP described dealing with Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters. A bloodied Justice MInister Andrew Little now knows how that feels.

Little has been dealt a short, sharp and brutal lesson in real politik by the master of MMP, Peters.

The NZ First leader pulled the rug out from Little’s hyped up plans to axe the three strikes law –  and deliberately doubled down on the lesson by waiting till the 11th hour before he did so.

In doing so, Peters has reinforced NZ First’s credentials with its supporters as a vital handbrake on Labour and the Greens, especially when they get too far ahead of public opinion, particularly on touch-stone issues like law and order.

He has also served a reminder to the two old parties – Labour and National – that MMP is all about governing by consensus.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Listen to this post: