Must read

The Conservative Party answers some hard questions

Last week I asked Kevin Stitt the Party Secretary some hard questions about the Conservative Party. Below are my questions and his answers in full and un-edited.


Question:

Are you able to confirm for our readers that Leighton Baker is the new leader of the Conservative party and is not keeping the seat warm for ex-leader Colin Craig who still claims to be the leader on his facebook page?

Answer:

Absolutely. Actually, I think you will find that it is his twitter account that still claims that, not his facebook account. He does not know how to sign into or use his twitter account as that was controlled by his previous Press Secretary. It appears the account has been hacked. We are working on having it removed from Twitter. Thanks for making us aware of this.

Colin Craig’s “hacked” twitter account
screenshot-whaleoil 21/02/17

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Done with Dunne

Guest post

Ohariu is one of the key electorate this year. With the deal done by the Greens, Labour sees this as a massive opportunity to take out one of National’s support partners, be it only 1 seat.

Are they right in having this expectation?

At first glance, Labour has a right to be excited. Their electoral candidate vote has grown since 2002. In 2014 the Labour candidate received 34% of the vote compared to Dunne’s 36%. National at the same time has dropped over the last 3 elections, however, this is mainly due to the deal that National have with Dunne. In 2014 the National candidate only received 16% of the vote. The Green candidate vote has remained steady at 7% since 2008.

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UPDATED: Help us decide which Whaleoil merchandise to put in our store

UPDATE: I removed the polo-shirt images as they are for staff only and removed the questions about them from the survey.

Before you complete the second survey please have a look at these photos. You only need to remember the letter A) B) or C) of the product/s you are interested in buying.

 

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Why National are in trouble

Guest post

Several commentators and other bloggers are saying the latest Colmar Brunton poll is great for National and the Key/English/McCully effect has made no difference. History tells us otherwise, they are in trouble.

Back in February 2008, National was polling at 54%, in the election they won with 45% of the vote.

In February 2011 and February 2014, National was polling at 51%, in the election they won 47% of the vote.

Every time National has polled high in February but dropped 4% or more each time in the elections.

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The Conservative Party on Immigration and New Zealand’s Refugee quota

I contacted National, Labour, Act, The Maori Party, NZ First, the Greens, the Opportunities Party, the Conservatives and United Future to ask them all three questions. The fifth party to respond to my questions was the Conservative party. My questions and the Conservative Party’s answers are published in full and un-edited.

Question:

The perception of many of our readers is that left-of-centre political parties prefer immigrants from low socio-economic countries who are highly dependent on the state and poorly educated because immigrants like that will naturally vote for the left-of-centre parties who allowed them in. Which immigrants get priority under your party’s policy and why?

Answer:

The Conservative Party would want to prioritise immigrants who can add to our economy and not depend on it. Our priorities for immigrants would be:
a.  Possessing skills or qualifications that we are in need of in New Zealand. These would have to be qualifications recognised in New Zealand to avoid the situation  that currently exists of qualified doctors being unable to practise medicine in New Zealand.

b.  Immigrants with a good grasp of the New Zealand language so that they can maximise the skills/ qualifications they have.
c.  Immigrants of good character. Any red flags raised by New Zealand or other entities should be enough to reject an application.

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The National Party on Immigration and the refugee quota

I contacted National, Labour, Act, The Maori Party, NZ First, the Greens, the Opportunities Party, the Conservatives and United Future to ask them all three questions. The fourth party to respond to my questions was the National Party. My questions and the Minister of Immigration Michael Woodhouse’s answers are published below in full and un-edited.

Question:

The perception of many of our readers is that left-of-centre political parties prefer immigrants from low socio-economic countries who are highly dependent on the state and poorly educated because immigrants like that will naturally vote for the left-of-centre parties who allowed them in. Which immigrants get priority under your party’s policy and why?

Answer:

Majority of our immigration policies are based on skill level and the Government is constantly making changes to improve the skill level of migrants coming to New Zealand.

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United Future on Immigration and New Zealand’s Refugee quota

I contacted National, Labour, Act, The Maori Party, NZ First, the Greens, the Opportunities Party, the Conservatives and United Future to ask them all three questions. The third party to respond to my questions was United Future. My questions and Peter Dunne’s answers are published in full and un-edited.

 

Question:

The perception of many of our readers is that left-of-centre political parties prefer immigrants from low socio-economic countries who are highly dependent on the state and poorly educated because immigrants like that will naturally vote for the left-of-centre parties who allowed them in. Which immigrants get priority under your party’s policy and why?

Answer:

UnitedFuture’s immigration policy is one that recognises the value that immigration holds for New Zealand, as highlighted in several recent pieces of research.

Our policy is designed to build upon the benefits New Zealand currently gains from immigration by introducing more space for business in skills-shortage areas to sponsor workers into the country.  That allows a direct matching of vacancy to worker without having too much bureaucracy in the middle.

Further, we would prioritise immediate family members and allow a fast-track option for new migrants who both have the majority of their family in the country and who demonstrate an ability to take care of them.

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The Act Party on Immigration and New Zealand’s Refugee quota

I contacted National, Labour, Act, The Maori Party, NZ First, the Greens, the Opportunities Party, the Conservatives and United Future to ask them all three questions. The second party to respond to my questions was The Act Party. Below are my questions and their answers in full and un-edited.

Question:

The perception of many of our readers is that left-of-centre political parties prefer immigrants from low socio-economic countries who are highly dependent on the state and poorly educated because immigrants like that will naturally vote for the left-of-centre parties who allowed them in. Which immigrants get priority under Act’s policy and why?

Answer:

ACT has not released our immigration policy for the 2017 election. However, we believe in general that immigration is a good thing. The perception that immigrants sponge off the taxpayer is not true: A recent New Zealand Initiative report showed that immigrants contribute, on average, a net $2600 per year to government coffers, compared to the New Zealand-born average of $170.

Skilled immigrants ready to fill job vacancies would get priority, as would people who want to invest or start a business here. International students should also be prioritised as they generate revenue allowing universities to provide a better service to New Zealand students, and reduce the burden on taxpayers. Our big cities need an increase in construction activity to meet demand for new houses (and infrastructure), so there should be an allowance for those who are coming to work or invest in the construction sector (once red tape is removed from the planning and building system). Immigrant labour was critical to the Christchurch rebuild.

We would continue to welcome family reunification with the caveat that immigrants should not be eligible for superannuation after only 10 years living in the country, we will announce an extension to this period later in the year.

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Are you in the Whaleoil draw to win a $299 NZV8 Hot Laps Voucher?

Are you already a Whaleoil subscriber?

If you are not already a subscriber are you going to subscribe before the 11th of March?

If you answered YES to either of those questions then you will be included in the draw to win a $299 voucher from our new sponsor NZV8 Hot Laps

BUT WAIT there’s more…..

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Survey reveals National Party vote cannot be taken for granted

Our Whaleoil survey on Thursday had 1195 responses in one day. One thousand responses is a good statistical sample of our conservative/libertarian readership. By this morning the number of responses had increased to 1255. It is a targeted sample as most of our readers are National Party supporters so what is revealed in this survey should be taken very seriously by National Party HQ. Given the results, the Act Party and New Zealand First should also be pricking up their ears as a lost vote for National could be a gained vote for them. The Act Party, especially at this stage, appears the most likely recipient of votes lost by National.

The Party vote is the vote most at risk for the National Party as only 31% of our readers confirmed that they will definitely be giving National their party vote compared to 46% that will definitely be giving them their electorate vote. The Act Party has 7% who will definitely be giving them their party vote and NZ First 2%. Where it gets really interesting is the number of people who say that they are undecided or that it is likely or highly likely that these two minor parties will get their party vote. When you take those numbers into consideration National and Bill English will see that they cannot take people who have voted for them previously under a John Key led government for granted.

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