Must read

When are politicians going to learn voters don’t want separate Maori wards?

Another vote, another predictable result. The only people surprised by this outcome are the wombles who put up the proposal for Maori wards in the first place. Quote:

Palmerston North people have spoken and more than two-thirds who voted were in opposition to creating separate Māori wards.

Results from a binding poll came in on Saturday night, with 14,567 voting against wards for the city council and 6530 voting for.

The percentage was 68.87 against and 30.88 per cent for.

The turnout was at 37.21 per cent of eligible voters, and 49 votes were counted as blank and four “informal” votes received.

There are still 117 special votes to be processed. End quote.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

Budget response: Midwives quit

This budget is going down as one of the most unpopular in living memory. Almost no one is happy.

Now the midwives are quitting in anger. The NZ Herald reports: Quote:

Midwives across the country say they are “devastated” with yesterday’s Budget announcement and are calling it quits.

Health Minister David Clark delivered a 8.9 per cent “catch-up” increase to community-based midwives fees, costing $4.5 million this financial year.

But midwives say it’s not enough.  

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

Ghost houses

It was bound to happen. Once you have a government that indicates it wants to tax everything that moves, and a few things that don’t, journalists crawl out of the woodwork all over the place with new ideas as to how this can be done.

This from Stuff today. Quote:

The locals call them “ghost houses”, and there could well be one in your street. If you live on Auckland’s North Shore, chances are there may be several.

They are the unoccupied houses, where the only people who come and go are the gardeners and random door-knockers. And sometimes, not even the garden maintenance people pay a visit.

And there are lots of these houses. Figures from the last census showed there were 141,366 empty dwellings in New Zealand, which are separate from houses that are vacant because their owners are away around census time. More than 33,000 houses in Auckland were officially classified as empty in 2016. End quote.

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Accountant. Boring. Loves tax. Needs to get out more. Loves the environment, but hates the Greens. Has been called a dinosaur. Wears it with pride.

Simon Collins pimps poor ahead of budget

Simon Collins is back at it pimping the poor ahead of the budget.

As is usual he’s picked the wrong people to use as poster children: Quote:

“Our outgoings are bigger than our income.”

That is the daily reality for Manurewa couple Michael and Mina Tamatoa and their four children aged 9, 7, 5, and 11 months.

Their hopes for the Budget are all about their children.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

It’s not me, it’s you

Have you ever tried to end your relationship with Vodafone?

Early last year I tried to organise the installation of fibre broadband through Vodafone but, because I live up a private drive, it was not a straightforward matter. For some reason, Vodafone imposed a time limit on the whole process of three months. Unfortunately, we simply couldn’t get everything organised (neighbours, a plan as to where the channels will be dug etc)  in time. So, sadly, as the deadline passed, I came to the conclusion that maybe my relationship with Vodafone was not as it used to be, and I needed to think about moving on.

So, I contacted Spark. We began the same process, but Spark did not put a time limit on the procedure. Without going into too much detail, it took eight months (from June last year until the beginning of February) to get the installation done, but we did it. As I was to become a Spark customer once the fibre installation was complete, it was then time for me and Vodafone to go our separate ways.

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Accountant. Boring. Loves tax. Needs to get out more. Loves the environment, but hates the Greens. Has been called a dinosaur. Wears it with pride.

No compulsion

 

I read an interesting opinion piece on Stuff today. Quote:

I know people who are savages.

These people drive their cars, eat icecream, spend their days Facebooking, scrapbooking, watching television and grumbling at their wives or husbands. They go to work, come home, take their dog for a walk. You might even be one of them.

But despite every thread of civilised cloth on their backs, these people have a set of primitive beliefs stretching back centuries.

Māoris, they think, are gonna steal their souls. End quote.

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Accountant. Boring. Loves tax. Needs to get out more. Loves the environment, but hates the Greens. Has been called a dinosaur. Wears it with pride.

Who wants cycle lanes ?

Artists impression, the reality is often somewhat different

Bear with me people, this is not a beat up.
Last week I wrote a post about Cyclists that don’t follow the rules and that lead to a flurry of interesting debate.
The subject of cycle lanes was raised and I thought that was worth exploring further. In both the comments and in my own ongoing discussions about the post, I learned that not all cyclists are in favour of cycle lanes and some chose not to use them for safety reasons.
But …. but ….. I thought the point of cycle lanes was to encourage cyclists by making it safer? If that is not happening, then something needs fixing.

Why would we continue to throw money at a solution that it seems neither party is happy with?

The feedback I have had is that cyclists would prefer to be amongst the traffic because vehicle drivers expect them to be there and know to look out for them.

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It’s great to have a voice.

“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter”

– Martin Luther King

Twyford’s trickery is coming home to roost

Phil Twyford’s housing trickery is coming undone fast. His mouth writes cheques this government can’t cash.

On the ‘Nation’ yesterday it was shown up by the Salvation Army: Quote:

The Government will be hard pushed to meet its pledge of 1500 new social housing places before the end of this winter, according to a Salvation Army social policy expert.

“It’s unrealistic to think you can find 1500 more places by the end of winter. It’s just not going to happen. There’s just not the capacity there to do that,” Alan Johnson told Newshub Nation on Saturday.

But the Government thinks it is possible, announcing a $37 million dollar investment to urgently increase social housing supply to help the homeless this winter.

No one needs to live in a car this winter,” said Housing Minister Phil Twyford at the announcement last Friday.

He said the 1500 places are “all secured and they’re all funded”.

“They’re a mix of new and additional public housing, so state- and community-provided housing, transitional and emergency housing, and Housing First places.” End quote.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

The great leap backwards: Spit washing

Thanks to Eugenie Sage and her incurable desire to ban things, it looks like we will be welcoming back spit washing and traumatising the children all because she wants to ban wet wipes: Quote:

The Associate Minister for the Environment is encouraging people to flush nothing but “pee, poo and paper” down the loo, as blockages caused by the flushing of wet wipes becomes an “expensive and increasing” problem.

Wet wipes are also causing huge – and disgusting – problems in the United Kingdom, where they are blamed for causing 93 percent of blocked sewerage pipes.

More than 5000 of the little white things were recovered from just 116m2 of the Thames River.

That problem could be eliminated as the UK government considers a ban on single-use plastics like straws, cotton swabs and wet wipes within 25 years. Under the ban, manufacturers will have to make such products biodegradable if they want to keep selling them in the United Kingdom.

Eugenie Sage, the Associate Minister for the Environment, didn’t commit to eliminating single-use wet wipes but said she’s keeping “a close watch” on what’s happening the UK.

“As Wellington Water says, the only thing people should flush down the loo is ‘pee, poo and paper (toilet paper that is)’,” she told Newshub.

“Wet wipes are an absolute headache because they can block pipes and help cause fatbergs, and block screens in wastewater pipes.”

Ms Sage encouraged manufacturers to think about the design of their products to make sure they can be reused, recycled or composted.

“In the case of wet wipes, these would need to be fully biodegradable, like toilet paper, in a sewerage system,” she said. End quote.

What won’t she ban? It might be a shorter list.

We shouldn’t be surprised that these dirty hippies want to bring back spit washing.

Next thing they will ban underarm, razors and waxing. Then they will require all women to wear dungarees. I can’t wait for them to ban toilet paper and insist we use reusable cloth. The mandatory long drops or composting toilets will really help with public sanitation as well.

 

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

Face of the day

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Contribution via Whaleoil staff and interns