1919

Photo of the Day

Rioters on the south side of the courthouse. Rioters climb the Omaha, Nebraska courthouse trying to get to Will Brown. Brown, a black man, was being held on the fourth floor of the courthouse. He was accused of raping a white woman. Photo from Nebraska State Historical Society.

A Horrible Lynching

On Sept. 28, 1919, Omaha’s courthouse was burned, three men were killed, and Omaha’s mayor was lynched, nearly to death.

Thousands of Omahans stormed the Douglas County Courthouse, calling for the death of prisoner William (Will) Brown, a black man accused of raping a white woman Agnes Loebeck, (also spelled Lobeck) in addition to (sometimes-called Loeback)

By the end of the night, the mob got what they wanted ? lynching Brown, shooting him to pieces, lighting him on fire and dragging his body through the streets of downtown Omaha. The rioters also very nearly successfully lynched Omaha?s mayor, Ed Smith, and set the courthouse on fire, causing $1 million in damages. Two other men died that day, both white, one a rioter, the other a bystander.

Not much is known about William Brown and his personal minutiae is lost to history, but the horrifying ?details of his lynching have been preserved.

From May through September 1919, over 25 race riots rocked cities from Texas to Illinois, Nebraska to Georgia. In Omaha, the trouble began on September 25, when a white woman, Agnes Loebeck, reported that she was assaulted by a black man.

The next morning, the?Bee?reached new lows reporting the event. The headline was: “Black Beast First Stick-up Couple.”

“The most daring attack on a white woman ever perpetrated in Omaha occurred one block south of Bancroft Street near Scenic Avenue in Gibson last night.”

Coverage in the?World-Herald?was slightly less inflammatory:

“Pretty little Agnes Loebeck . . . was assaulted . . . by an unidentified Negro at twelve O?clock last night, while she was returning to her home in company with Milton Hoffman, a cripple.”

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

King George V presents the King's Cup to James Ryan, captain of the New Zealand Services Rugby Team, after the team's win in the Inter-Services Tournament at Twickenham rugby ground, London in 1919. Major General Charles William Melvill and another officer look on. The team some of whom have fern leaf emblems on their jerseys are standing in a line. A film cameraman appears in the background. Photograph taken April 1919 by Thomas Frederick Scales.

King George V presents the King’s Cup to James Ryan, captain of the New Zealand Services Rugby Team, after the team’s win in the Inter-Services Tournament at Twickenham rugby ground, London in 1919. Major General Charles William Melvill and another officer look on. The team some of whom have fern leaf emblems on their jerseys are standing in a line. A film cameraman appears in the background. Photograph taken April 1919 by Thomas Frederick Scales.

The Forgotten Story of

The First Ever ?World Cup?

?In 1919, in the aftermath of WWI, a group of international rugby teams gathered in Britain for The King?s Cup, a tournament unprecedented in its time but little remembered today. Some rugby historians have dubbed The King’s Cup as the ?First Rugby World Cup Tournament.?

On October 31, the two finalists of the 2015 Rugby World Cup will take to the hallowed turf of Twickenham for what will be the finale of, officially at least, the 8th edition of a tournament that began in 1987. But on the same pitch on April 19, 1919 ? some 96 years ago ? military teams representing New Zealand and Great Britain faced off in the final of what, for all intents and purposes, was a World Cup in all but name: The King?s Cup.

Along with the two finalists, military teams from Canada, Australia and South Africa took part, as well as an RAF side made up of players from various nations. It was a gathering of international rugby talent that had never been seen before.

Read more »

Map of the Day

Bluff Harbour 1919

Invercargill and Bluff Harbour ?- ?1919