1960s

Photo of the Day

Beach Boys in a Yellow Jalopy in 1962. COURTESY OF CAPITOL RECORDS ARCHIVE

Beach Boys in a Yellow Jalopy in 1962. COURTESY OF CAPITOL RECORDS ARCHIVE

The Beach Boys’ Crazy Summer

The 50th Reunion Tour was a World Concert Tour by The Beach Boys

Inside the group’s 50th anniversary 2012 reunion tour: How the legendary group fell apart and came back together and how Brian Wilson gets along with his old bandmates.
“The vibe in Burbank is collegial, but each Beach Boy is locked into his own orbit. Wilson and Love tend to communicate through the musical directors they’ve retained from their respective touring bands; Jardine, Johnston, and Marks hover on the margins. Over lunch, Jardine says he’s been urging Love to open the second half of the set with ‘Our Prayer,’ the hushed choral prelude to Smile, but so far, Love has been brushing him off. ‘With him, you never know if it’s confrontational or uncomfortable because he’s able to mask any kind of negativity,’ Jardine says. ‘You never know if you’ve (expletive) up or not.’ When I mention ‘‘Til I Die,’ a stark Wilson solo composition from 1971, Johnston, who’s sitting nearby, insists that it was ‘the last Brian Wilson recording. Ever. The career ended for me right with that song.’ But why? ‘Because he was still 100 percent,’ Johnston explains. ‘Now, he’s … you know, a senior guy.'”

Brian Wilson, the lumbering savant who wrote, produced and sang an outlandish number of immortal pop songs back in the 1960s with his band, the Beach Boys, is swiveling in a chair, belly out, arms dangling, next to his faux-grand piano at the cavernous Burbank, Calif. studio where he and the rest of the group’s surviving members are rehearsing for their much-ballyhooed 50th Anniversary reunion tour, which was set to start in 2012.

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Sealand several months after the devastating fire of 2006.

Sealand several months after the devastating fire of 2006.

Sealand

The Principality of Sealand is a unique little micronation with a colourful history. Located six miles off the eastern shores of Britain, it is one of four Maunsell Naval Sea Forts deployed by Britain during World War 2. It was originally called Roughs Tower, and was was used to monitor and report German minelaying in the waters off England. During the war, it was home to 150-300 personnel, radar equipment, two 6-inch guns, and two 40mm anti-aircraft autocannons. But after being abandoned by the Royal Navy in 1956, this artificial island on the high seas has been the site of a pirate radio-landing pad, a takeover, a controversial declaration of independence, a coup, and its own miniature war.

In the 1960s, Roy Bates, a former major in the British Army, was among a group of disc jockeys who tried to avoid England’s restrictive broadcasting regulations by setting up pirate radio stations on some of the country’s abandoned offshore outposts, which had been used to fire ground artillery at German aircraft during World War II.

Bates began broadcasting from one outpost within the three-mile limit of England’s territorial waters, and when he was driven from there in 1966 he planned to start a station at Her Majesty’s Fort Roughs, which was in international waters. Instead, he founded Sealand.

On Sept. 2, 1967, Mr. Bates declared it an independent nation, himself its royal overseer and his wife, Joan, its princess. Well It was her birthday.

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo: Getty Images

Photo: Getty Images

Charles Manson

The Making of a Serial Killer

On August 9, 1969, members of the Manson Family, under orders from their leader Charles Manson, committed one of the most terrifying crimes in American history when they broke into the Los Angeles home of pregnant actress Sharon Tate and savagely murdered her and four of her houseguests. Here are some revealing untold details of his life from the people who knew him. Even as a child Manson showed disturbing signs of becoming a serial killer.

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

SOURCEFAM_3

For The Love of Yod

Father Yod and his 13 Wives

In the ’60s, a man called James Baker created The Source, an alternative family movement based around health food, group sex, rock’n’roll and the use of a communal Rolls Royce.

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo via: Paolo Fissore, “La pubblicità mette le ruote”, Automobile Club Cuneo, Savigliano 2004. Shoe-shaped car advertising Ebano polish, by Grazia bodyshop in Bologna.

Photo via: Paolo Fissore, “La pubblicità mette le ruote”, Automobile Club Cuneo, Savigliano 2004. Shoe-shaped car advertising Ebano polish, by Grazia bodyshop in Bologna.

Ads on Wheels

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images. August 1966: A woman stands outside the Adele Ross clothing design store, looking at an Anti-Miniskirt Sign, in New York City. The sign reads 'If the necklines get any lower and the skirts get any higher...You can use the dress for a belt.'

Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images.
August 1966: A woman stands outside the Adele Ross clothing design store, looking at an Anti-Miniskirt Sign, in New York City. The sign reads ‘If the necklines get any lower and the skirts get any higher…You can use the dress for a belt.’

The Mini Skirt

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo: Vintage Everyday

Photo: Vintage Everyday

Economy Class seating on a Pan Am 747 in the late 1960’s

Tagged:

Forget making new trailers for the Hobbit – just use this piece of ’60’s gold

Freaky Friday

Back in 1969 Phil Goff joined the Labour party.

In 1967 this song was all the rage.

Up, Up and Away” is a 1967 song written by Jimmy Webb and recorded by The 5th Dimension, that became a major pop hit, reaching #7 on the U.S. Pop Singles chart and #18 in Canada. The single peaked at #9 on Billboard’s Easy Listening Top 40.

Phil Goff: bringing the 60s back into NZ politics.