48 counts of aggravated first-degree murder

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Gary Leon Ridgway. King County plea agreement: Pleaded guilty Nov. 5, 2003, to 48 counts of aggravated first-degree murder in a deal that spared him from execution and finally brought answers in the infamous and long-unsolved slayings.

Gary Leon Ridgway. King County plea agreement: Pleaded guilty in 2003, to 48 counts of aggravated first-degree murder in a deal that spared him from execution and finally brought answers in the infamous and long-unsolved slayings.

Green River Killer

Chillingly, He referred to Killing Young Women as his “Career.”

Warning :Some parts in this story are disturbing

He may be America’s most prolific serial killer. Yet the name Gary Ridgway—a.k.a. the Green River Killer—is not as well known when compared to the many other murderers who have haunted nation’s headlines. Convicted of killing 49 women over the course of two decades, Ridgway has confessed to killing almost twice that number, and admitted in later statements that he claimed so many lives he lost count.

On August 15, 1982, Robert Ainsworth, 41, stepped into his rubber raft and began his descent south down the Green River toward the outer edge of Seattle’s city limits. It was a trip he had made on many occasions, yet this time it would be different. As he drifted slowly downstream, he noticed a middle-aged balding man standing by the riverbank and a second, younger man sitting in a nearby pickup truck. Ainsworth suspected that the men were out for a day’s fishing.

He asked the older man if he had caught anything. The man replied that he had not. According to Smith and Guillen’s book, The Search for the Green River Killer , the man standing then asked Ainsworth if he found anything, to which Ainsworth replied, “Just this old singletree.” Soon after, the two men left in the old pick-up truck and Ainsworth continued to float down the river. Moments later he found himself surrounded by death.

As he peered into the clear waters his gaze was met by staring eyes. A young black woman’s face was floating just beneath the surface of the water, her body swaying beneath her with the current. Believing it might be a mannequin, Ainsworth attempted to snag the figure with a pole. Accidentally, the raft overturned as he tried to dislodge the figure from a rock and Ainsworth fell into the river. To his horror, he realized that the figure was not a mannequin, but a dead woman. Seconds later he saw another floating corpse of a half nude black woman, partially submerged in the water.

Quickly, Ainsworth swam toward the riverbank where the truck stood earlier. In shock, he sat down and waited for help to arrive. Within a half hour, he noticed a man with two children on bicycles. He stopped them, told them of his gruesome discovery and asked them to get the police. Before long, a policeman arrived at the scene and questioned Ainsworth about his find. The officer disbelievingly walked into the shallow river and reached out toward the ghostly form. The officer immediately called for backup.

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